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CWAAS Books

Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society publications

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By agreement with the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society (CWAAS), Cumbria Archive Service is pleased to be able offer online sales of the publications of the Society. Since its foundation in 1866, the Society has been the pre-eminent body for the study of local history and archaeology in Cumbria and it continues to publish and organise a wide variety of relevant activities to the present day.

The staple of the Society's publishing has always been the Transactions commencing in 1874 and produced annually to the present. The Society continues to publish a large number of single-volume studies, archaeological reports, parish registers and original records. Many earlier CWAAS publications are long out of print. However, new titles continue to be published, and those available are listed on this page. Further details about these publications and the society can be found on the CWAAS website. A number of annual Transactions from the 1970s onwards (with some previous years) are still available for sale. Customers should contact Carlisle Archive Centre for further information on these.

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Life, Death and Landscape on the Abbeytown Ridge in the 2nd and 3rd Millennium BC: Excavations at Overby Quarry and New Cowper Quarry
Author:
David Jackson & Damion Churchill
Category:
Local history
Price:
£15.00
ISBN No.:
978 1873124 76 5
Published:
2017
Product:
Abbeytown Ridge/70000/C
 

The Solway Plain is an important repository for evidence of early historical and pre-history periods. The work at Overby and New Cowper on the Abbeytown Ridge came about as the result of planning applications for quarries and was undertaken in the early years of the new century. At New Cowper a spread of artefacts reveals hints of human habitation from the end of the Ice Age to potentially the early medieval period. At Overby, about a kilometre away, the Bronze Age time span is more compact, and there it is possible, even at this distance in time, to discern suggestions of a single potter working on at least two of the vessels found on site.

Softback Black and white text; four-colour cover Illustrated with 22 figures, 5 plates, and 12 tables, CWAAS Tract Series vol 26. 210 x 148mm, CARR 7.

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The Ague: a history of indigenous malaria In Cumbria and the north
Author:
Ian D. Hodkinson
Category:
Local history
Price:
£7.50
ISBN No.:
978 1 873124 74 1
Published:
2016
Product:
Ague/70000/C
 

Ague or marsh fever (vivax malaria) is a disease transmitted by female blood sucking mosquitoes that breed in shallow stagnant water. During the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries it was endemic in the English fenlands and the coastal marshes of Kent and Essex and was recorded spasmodically from scattered locations elsewhere in Britain. Drainage of wetlands for agriculture, changing land use and the discovery of quinine as an effective treatment led to its eradication from most areas by the late nineteenth century. It was a disease that disappeared before its true nature was known. However, the disease's history in many parts of Britain, especially the north, is poorly researched and incompletely understood. This book draws together a highly dispersed literature to examine the history, past distribution and importance of 'the ague' in northern Britain, with a particular focus on Cumbria. It begins by introducing the biology of the disease and its mosquito vectors before examining the evidence for the wider occurrence of ague during historical times and its impact on both urban and rural agricultural communities. The rich northern folklore associated with ague, relating to its causes and treatment, is next considered before the reasons for its decline are discussed. The book concludes by examining the possibility of malaria re-establishing its former presence in Cumbria and the north as a result of climate warming and other factors.

Ian Hodkinson is a retired Professor of Entomology and Animal Ecology, who lives in Levens, Cumbria, overlooking the Lyth Valley, a former known malarial area. He has worked extensively on the implications of climate change for invertebrate populations, particularly those of Arctic and Alpine habitats.

Softback 84 pages with 18 illustrations, CWAAS Tract Series vol 26. 210 x 148mm.

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Revealing Cumbria`s Past: 160 Years of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society
Author:
Edited by Michael Winstanley
Category:
Local history
Price:
£15.00
ISBN No.:
ISBN 978 1873124 73 4
Published:
2016
Product:
CWAAS150/70000/C
 

In 1916, at the time of the Society's golden jubilee, the world was at war, and the event was limited to a dinner, a 'lantern lecture' by the President and a visit to Hadrian's Wall. At the time of the Centenary in 1966, the Society sponsored an excavation at the Roman fort at Maryport and organized an ambitious celebratory three-day meeting based in Carlisle. This involved a dinner at the Crown and Mitre Hotel, and a series of visits to Tullie House Museum, Carlisle Cathedral and Castle, Maryport Roman Fort (to examine the excavations), Birdoswald Roman Fort, Naworth Castle and Lanercost Priory. For the 150th anniversary in 2016, the Society planned a series of celebratory events, completed a project to digitize Transactions, and commissioned this book, the first full history.

For 150 years the Society has tried to remain true to the vision of the founders despite the disappearance in 1974 of the counties of 'Cumberland and Westmorland' and significant changes to the concepts 'antiquarian and archaeological' and to the methodologies underlying the study of the past. From the beginning the area of Lancashire North of the Sands was considered part of the region covered by the Society's interests, so with the local government reorganization of 1974 which created Cumbria County Council covering Cumberland, Westmorland, Lancashire North of the Sands and the area around Sedbergh and Dent the administrative boundaries in effect caught up with the area traditionally covered by the Society.

Part 1 begins with a chapter which charts the history of the Society in the context of changes in how the past has been studied and the role of county societies in the development of regional history. Perhaps the most significant contribution of the Society to an understanding of Cumbria's past has been as a publisher both of Transactions and of a diverse range of books. This is explored in Chapter 2. The focus of all the chapters in Part 2 is the role the Society has played in developing our understanding of Cumbria's past.

Given the timespan and the range of publications this is necessarily selective. Archaeology has been a significant part of the Society's activities since it was founded. Chapter 3 explores the varied interests of archaeologists, alongside the use of changing methodologies, that have characterised Cumbrian archaeology during the Society's lifetime. Some of the sub-disciplines of local history over the 150 years are explored in chapters 4-8. These include longstanding areas of interest such as political, religious and social history as well as more recent contributions on industrial history/archaeology and the development of vernacular buildings. As an illustration of the antiquarianism of the early years we have included a chapter exploring the nature of the Society's early interest in customs and folklore, but for reasons of space we have had to exclude studies of the early enthusiasm for genealogy, manorial descents and ecclesiastical buildings. The concluding chapter (Chapter 9) considers the significance of the Society, both regionally and nationally, over its first 150 years. Biographical summaries of the Presidents and a complete list of publications are incorporated as appendices as is a short history of the Society's Library. A major anniversary project has been the complete calendaring of the Society's records including the archives of CWAAS, the affiliated groups and key members of the Society. A brief summary of what exists is set out in a further appendix and a detailed list can be consulted on the Society's website.

Paperback 368 pages with 102 illustrations, CWAAS Extra Series 45.

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Patronage, Power and Politics in Appleby in the era of Lady Anne Clifford 1649-1689
Author:
Roger Smalley
Category:
Local history
Price:
£13.50
ISBN No.:
978 1 873124710
Published:
2015
Product:
Patronage/70000/C
 

This book provides an account of politics in the Westmorland parliamentary constituency of Appleby between the restoration of King Charles II in 1660 and the deposition of his successor King James II in 1688-9. The study focuses on the remarkable figure of Lady Anne Clifford, countess of Dorset, Pembroke and Montgomery (1590-1676). From the time of her arrival in her hereditary northern estates in 1649 she began a successful process of litigation in order to secure her properties. As a result her vast personal wealth and patronage secured for her an undisputed political influence in Appleby which was vindicated in a key parliamentary by-election in 1668.

Before that victory, she had led Appleby into a wholehearted celebration of the return of the Anglican monarchy in the person of Charles II (even though she herself had tactically collaborated with the Cromwellian and puritan system of the 1650s). The borough then emerged as a staunchly royalist community, with no Protestant Nonconformist presence around which opposition politics might form. The attempt of a group of puritan radicals from outside the town to seize control of it in the Kaber Rigg Plot of 1663 confirmed monarchist allegiances locally under the leadership of Sir Philip Musgrave of Edenhall. Appleby's corporation resolutely affirmed its commitment to the Church of England and the throne and in the course of the 1680s the borough became a flagship of the new Tory party. As a result of the attempts by the Catholic King James I to reduce the power and privileges of the Church of England Appleby was torn between Anglican and monarchist allegiances.

Based on intensive research in the Carlisle and Kendal archives and enriched with printed primary sources, this well-written, well-presented book offers vivid insights into the political, social, economic and religious life of one of Cumbria's most historic towns.

Michael Mullett is Emeritus Professor of Cultural and Religious History at the University of Lancaster, where he taught early modern British and European history for four decades until his official retirement in 2008.He is currently preparing a full-length history of Penrith.

Paperback, 126 pages , no illustrations. CWAAS Tract Series volume 25.

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Appleby Gypsy Horse Fair: Mythology, Origins, Evolution and Evaluation
Author:
Andrew Connell
Category:
Local history
Price:
£12.00
ISBN No.:
978 1 873124 68 0
Published:
2015
Product:
ApplebyHorse/70000/C
 

Despite the media attention that Appleby Fair now annually attracts, it has never before been the subject of scholarly research. This book marshals and critically examines the available evidence, much of it previously unused, separating assertion from reality and demonstrating how mythology and 'back history' have been created. Andrew Connell places Appleby Fair in the context of English fairs, Cumbria's agricultural economy and national and local politics. Working back from the Fair of the present day, he examines the origins and authenticity of the much-repeated claim that it originated under the aegis of a charter of James II in 1685.

He traces its evolution in the course of the nineteenth century from a cattle and sheep drovers' fair to an occasion dominated by horse sales, and links that development to the increasing identification of Appleby Fair with Gypsy/Travellers, for whom it has acquired a spiritual resonance. He explores the undulating relationship between Appleby Fair, resident communities and the forces of law and order. He disentangles the often ambiguous roles, sometimes contradictory roles played by different local authorities. He analyses periodic attempts to terminate the Fair and concludes by evaluating the factors that have enabled it to survive and continue to flourish, seemingly against the odds.
Softback 112 pages, with 22 illustrations, CWAAS Extra Series vol XLIV.

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Rose Castle and the Bishops of Carlisle 1133-2012
Author:
David W.V.Weston
Category:
Church history
Price:
£13.00
ISBN No.:
9781873124628
Published:
2013
Product:
Rose/70000/C
 

This authoritative history of Rose Castle spans 800 years of its history and its evolution, first as a defensive building and latterly as a fine residence. Drawing on original sources, the author depicts the dawn of the Carlisle diocese and its bishops, and particularly by the skilful use of early illustrations shows how the castle has developed under its successive occupants. He draws on an extensive knowledge of Rose Castle and the diocese of Carlisle acquired through his work as domestic chaplain at Rose Castle, and as residentiary canon and canon librarian of Carlisle Cathedral. His published works include Carlisle Cathedral History published in 2000 and entries in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, both in print and on-line. The volume will be of special interest to ecclesiastical, architectural and regional historians, and to all those fascinated by the history of the North West of England and the influence of Carlisle diocese on the region.

Softback 204 pages with 99 Illustrations, Size 245mm x 174mm, CWAAS Extra Series vol XL.

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Aldingham Motte, Cumbria, and its environs in the Medieval Period
Author:
Daniel W. Elsworth and Thomas Mace, editors
Category:
Local history
Price:
£15.00
ISBN No.:
978 1873124 69 7
Published:
2015
Product:
Aldingham/70000/C
 

x + 83 pp. 32 figs 13 plates, CARR Series 5.

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Cattle Droving, Cotton and Land Ownership: a Cumbria Family Saga
Author:
Peter Roebuck
Category:
Local history
Price:
£18.00
ISBN No.:
978 1 873124 66 6
Published:
2014
Product:
Droving/70000/C
 

Established at Wreay in the 16th century, the Parkers later acquired further property at Carleton and at Old Town near High Hesket, all south of Carlisle. Until the 1790s they serviced the droving trade, accommodating and feedig cattle moving south from Scotland and Ireland and becoming among the most prosperous yeomen-farming families. Then, financed by a mortgage on Old Town, a group of them moved south to Stockport and Manchester. There they became manufacturers and merchants; they exported cotton goods all over the world and, as property developers, contributed substantially to the re-building of central Manchester. In 1822 they used their new-found wealth to purchase other property in Cumbrian and were then energetically engaged in improvements at and around both Warwick Hall near Carlisle and Skirwith Abbey near Penrith, becoming senior members of the county community. However the senior branch of the family at Old Town failed to reproduce itself and the estate was split into three parts from 1856. The fortunes of the successor branches failed to prosper; and along with Warwick Hall, the Old Town property was sold at the turn of the 19th century. The family's experience offers a fascinating perspaective on the economic and social history of north-west England and, in particular, on the links between Lancashire and Cumbria.

Peter Roebuck is Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Ulster where, in 2002, he was awarded a C.B.E. 'for services to high education in Northern Ireland'. He was Founding Editor (with David Dickson) of Irish Economic and Social History, 1974-1984 and has published widely on British and Irish agrarian history and related topics.

Softback 184 pages with 21 illustrations, CWAAS Extra Series vol XLIII.

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Hadrian`s Wall: A History of Archaeological Thought
Author:
David Breeze
Category:
Local history
Price:
£15.20
ISBN No.:
978 1873124 67 3
Published:
2014
Product:
Hadrian/70000/C
 

Interpretations of the function and history of Hadrian's Wall have been offered for 1,800 years. In this book, David Breeze considers these interpretations in order to understand how our present beliefs have been acquired, and to understand why we interpret Hadrian's Wall in the way that we do. He undertakes this by examining eleven topics which illuminate our understanding of this great Roman frontier. These include the role of Hadrian in building the Wall, the way in which the relationships between the various elements of the frontier were elucidated, the importance of understanding the sequence of building the Wall and recording all its component parts, the date of the rebuilding of the Turf Wall, how the Wall was manned, the function of the Wall, and the moving end date for the frontier.

David Breeze served as President of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society from 2011 to 2014 having been President of the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle. His first paper, on the building of Hadrian's Wall, was published in 1968 and since then he has written several books on the Wall as well as many papers on this and other frontiers. He is chairman of the International Congress of Roman Frontier Studies.

Paperback 172 pages with 78 illustrations, CWAAS Extra Series vol XLII.

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North-West England from the Romans to the Tudors: Essays in memory of John Macnair Todd
Author:
Keith J. Stringer, editor
Category:
Local history
Price:
£40.00
ISBN No.:
978 1873124 65 9
Published:
2014
Product:
Todd/70000/C
 

John MacNair Todd (1934-2009) was President, Vice-President and a member of the Council of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society. A solicitor by profession he became a respected historian and lecturer of the Middle Ages, with a noted association with the History Department of the University of Lancaster. He contributed a number of articles and notes to the Transactions of the CWAAS, his masterwork being his edition of the Lanercost Cartulary, published by the CWAAS and the Surtees Society in 1997.

CONTENTS: Foreword: John Macnair Todd by Alexander Grant ; 1. Roman Cumbria: Rome's 'Wild West'? by David Shotter; 2. Shedding Light on the 'Dark Ages' in Cumbria: Through a Glass Darkly by Rachel Newman; 3. Cumbrian Parish Origins by Deirdre O'Sullivan; 4. King Henry II's Charter for Adam, Nepos of the Sheriff of Carlisle by Hugh F Doherty; 5. Lordship and Society in Medieval Cumberland: Gilsland under the Moultons (c.1240-1313) by Keith Stringer; 6. The St Bees Lord and Lady, and their Lineage by Alexander Grant; 7. Laurence Nowell of Read Hall, Lancashire (c.1530óc.1569): Lexicographer, Toponymist, Cartographer, Enigma by William D. Shannon; 8. Problems of an Elizabethan Prelate: The Episcopate of John May, Bishop of Carlisle (1577-1598) by Henry Summerson.  A Bibliography of the Published Works of John Macnair Todd. Indexed.

Hardback with dust jacket, 288 + xviii pages with 32 figures, CWAAS Extra Series vol XLI. 

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Politics and Religion in Restoration Cockermouth
Author:
Michael A. Mullett
Category:
Local history
Price:
£8.50
ISBN No.:
978 1873124 64 2
Published:
2014
Product:
RestCmouth/70000/C
 

This book provides an account of the political and religious life of the borough and parliamentary constituency of Cockermouth during the reigns of kings Charles II and James II between 1660 and 1688. After an introductory survey of the economic, social, institutional and ecclesiastical life and structures of the town, the eight further chapters offer the reader closely observed analyses of the town's well-documented parliamentary elections. The emergency of a Tory party-political profile is vividly chronicled, along with the existence of a credible Whig party alternative. Cockermouth is thus sharply portrayed as playing an important role in the emergence of a national two-party system.

In what was still a deeply religious country, Cockermouth was caught up in the ecclesiastical conflicts of the period. The dominant figure in this story is that of the Congregational minister, George Larkham, whose fast-paced narrative of his church's vicissitudes, through a period of often harsh repression, supply an unrivalled account of the fortunes and misfortunes of a provincial Non-Conformist community in later Stuart England. Based on primary research in national and regional records, and written in a highly readable style, this study offers valuable insights into the history of one of Cumbria's most important urban centres.

Michael Mullett is Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Lancaster, where he taught for four decades until retirement in 2008. He chairs the Penrith regional group of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society, and is an assistant editor of the Society's Transactions. He is also currently preparing a study of politics, religion and the influence of Lady Anne Clifford in Appleby, 1660-1688.

Paperback, 90 pages, no illustrations; 148x210x7mm, CWAAS Tract Series vol XXIV.

 

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Agitate! Educate! Organise! cover (click to view larger image)
Agitate! Educate! Organise! Political Dissent in Westmorland from 1880 - 1930
Author:
Roger Smalley
Category:
Local history
Price:
£15.00
ISBN No.:
978 1 873124598
Published:
2013
Product:
Agitate/70000/C
 

In his examination of fifty years of Westmorland's history the author focuses on the role of dissent. The county is often represented as a bastion of paternalism, a place where social and political control was in the hands of great landowners and wealthy businessmen and went unchallenged. This study exposes the inaccuracy of that stereotype by showing the strength of Westmorland's involvement with national protest movements between 1880 and 1930.

The organisations considered here were at the heart of contemporary attempts to create a better world. What emerges is a history which gives a place to those who challenged the establishment - the supporters of votes for women, of fairer working conditions, of local democracy, and of peaceful solutions to differences between nations. They deserve to be better known, for their influence spread beyond Westmorland and contributed to the success of national and international campaigns for change.

Roger Smalley is the author of 'Depression and the New Deal' (1990), 'The Westmorland Suffragists' (2010), 'Theodora Wilson Wilson, Westmorland's Forgotten Rebel' (2010) and 'The Labour Movement in Westmorland' (2011). He is currently working on a biography of the Lancashire socialist Ether Carnie Holdsworth.

Paperback 120 pages with 33 illustrations, CWAAS Extra Series vol XXXVIII.

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Holme Cultram Abbey (click to view larger image)
St Mary`s Abbey, Holme Cultram, Abbeytown, Cumbria
Author:
Jan Walker and Mark Graham
Category:
Local history
Price:
£10.00
ISBN No.:
978 1873124 61 1
Published:
2013
Product:
HolmeCultram/70000/C
 

A4 127 pages, 46 Figures, 23 Plates. CWAAS Research Series vol VI.

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Arctic Wonders (click to view larger image)
In Search of Arctic Wonders. Cumbria and the Arctic in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries
Author:
Rob David
Category:
Local history
Price:
£15.00
ISBN No.:
978 1 873124 60 4
Published:
2013
Product:
Arctic/70000/C
 

In this illustrated book, Dr Rob David explores the connections between Cumbria and the Arctic during one of the great eras of polar exploration. Many of the great names associated with the Arctic - Sir John Barrow, Sir William Edward Parry, Sir John Richardson and Sir John Ross - feature alongside less well-known explorers such as Skeffington Lutwidge. The polar adventures of the Fifth Earl of Lonsdale
contrast with the Arctic exploits of Cumbrian mariners and ship builders such as Joseph Benn and George Taylor. The exciting stories of whaling vessels connected to the port of Whitehaven are vividly recounted. The book reveals that at one time curiosities acquired by travellers to the Arctic and spectacular polar entertainments were on show across the county. A useful gazetteer of surviving artefacts and locations with Arctic associations is included.

After completing a doctorate in British culture and the Arctic at Lancaster University, Rob David has continued to study the Arctic as it relates to Cumbria. He is also the author of The Arctic in the British Imagination 1818-1914, published by Manchester University Press in 2000.

Softback, 148 Pages, 78 Illustrations, Size 245mm x 174mm. CWAAS Extra Series vol XXXIX.

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First Souvenirs (click to view larger image)
The First Souvenirs: Enamelled Vessels from Hadrian`s Wall
Author:
David Breeze, editor
Category:
Archaeology
Price:
£15.00
ISBN No.:
978 1 873124 58 1
Published:
2012
Product:
FirstSouvenirs/70000/C
 

During the 2009 Pilgrimage of Hadrian's Wall Ernst Kunzle, the foremost expert on Roman enamelled vessels, was invited to deliver a lecture placing the newly-discovered Ilam Pan in its setting. Tullie House Museum, Carlisle, also prepared a special exhibition containing the Rudge Cup, Amiens Patera and Ilam Pan to coincide with the Pilgrimage; these vessels had only once previously been displayed together, at the 2008 Hadrians exhibition at the British Museum. These three decorated small pans recording the names of some of the forts on Hadrian's Wall are the subject of this volume.

The contributors to this book are all experts in the field of Roman archaeology. The authors describe and discuss each of the vessels and related objects, placing them in their international context. The place of manufacture and the use of the pans is also considered.

This beautiful illustrated full colour volume will appeal to all those with and interest in Roman history, Hadrian's Wall and ancient artefacts.

Softback, full colour, 136 pages, 70 illustrations. 245 x 174mm. CWAAS Extra Series vol XXXVII

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The Cockermouth Congregational Church Book (1651-c.1765)
Author:
edited by R. B. Wordsworth
Category:
Local history
Price:
£27.70
ISBN No.:
978 1 873124 55 0
Published:
2012
Product:
CmouthChBook/70000/C
 

The 'church book' of the Independent congregation at Cockermouth is a remarkable document charting the origins and life of a nonconformist church from its foundation in 1651 through to the eighteenth century. The bulk of it written by George Larkham, the first pastor of the Independents in Cockermouth. The book charts the vicissitudes of the church from the Interregnum, through its struggle for survival in the face of official persecution under the Clarendon Code from 1662, to freedom of worship after the Toleration Act of 1689. It sheds light on the links between Larkham's congregation and other Independent churches in Cumbria and on relations with other religious groups, notably the Quakers. This volume presents for the
first time a full scholarly edition of this important document.

Robert Wordsworth, an engineer by profession, describes himself as 'a latter-day historian', having embarked on the study of history in his retirement. This volume draws on work he undertook as a postgraduate research student at Lancaster University.

Fully Indexed. Size 245mm x 174mm 208 pages. 10 black & white illustrations. Softback. Record Series XXI.

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Cockermouth Main Street cover (click to view larger image)
Cockermouth, Cumbria: archaeological investigation of three burgage plots in Main Street
Author:
Roger Leech and Richard Gregory
Category:
Local history
Price:
£9.30
ISBN No.:
978 1873124 56 7
Published:
2012
Product:
CmouthMainSt/70000/C
 

In 1980 and 1981, three former burgage plots on Main Street, Cockermouth, opposite the road to the Harris Bridge over the River Derwent, and almost opposite William Wordsworth's birthplace, became available for excavation by the then Cumbria and Lancashire Archaeological Unit. The site may have been occupied from c 1200 continuously to the present day and, after a variety of ownerships, became part of the Lowther estate from 1761. Opportunities for intensive examination of a significant area at the core of an urban centre are rare, and the three plots proved rewarding. In keeping with burgage plots elsewhere, domestic dwellings fronted the street, while to their rear there were ancillary buildings, refuse pits, and a well, and behind those, elements of buildings used for agricultural or industrial purposes. Building materials included timber and then clay, followed by brick and stone, and with some evidence of roofing slate. Careful examination of the excavation evidence revealed successive rebuildings, particularly around 1700, and a variety of forms of stairs, hearths, and windows. The findings have been analysed and written up by Oxford Archaeology North in association with Roger Leech (a former director of the organisation and the site director), and with an historical background by Angus Winchester that puts their development in context. They both enhance our knowledge of the early history of Cockermouth and contribute valuable comparative material about the development of urban settlements in the region.
80 pages + preliminary pages, 24 figures, 15 plates. Paperback with 4 colour cover 210x295x10mm. CARR series vol 3.

OUT OF STOCK

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Edward I at Carlisle : King and Parliament in 1307
Author:
Henry Summerson
Category:
Local history
Price:
£6.50
ISBN No.:
978 1873 1 24543
Published:
2011
Product:
EdwardI/70000/C
 

Edward I stayed in Carlisle for over three months in 1307, which proved to be the last year in the life of one of medieval England's greatest kings. The rich variety of sources used in this book illuminate his visit from several directions. They show Edward as a ruler, holding his parliament in the castle and directing military operations against Robert Bruce. They shed light on his piety, through his regular distributions of alms and the remarkable collection of relics which accompanied him, and also on his relations with members of his family. They reveal that he was surrounded by all the trappings of great wealth, and suggest that the conclusions which some historians have reached about his financial problems at the end of his reign have been over-stated. And they also demonstrate the impact made on the citizens of Carlisle by the presence of the royal court, and its members' demands f or food and drink, transport and housing.

Heny Summerson's two volume Medieval Carlisle appeared in 1993. His other publications include substantial contributions to histories of Carlisle Castle (1990), Brougham Castle (1998), and Lanercost Priory (2000), and a history of the Aglionby family (2007). He worked for many years on the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, published in 2004.

56 pages, 15 black and white illustrations. Softback cover 210x165mm. CWAAS Tract Series vol 23.

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Carlisle: excavations at Rickergate, 1998-9, and 53-55 Botchergate, 2001
Author:
Edited by Rachel Newman, Oxford Archaeology North
Category:
Local history
Price:
£15.00
ISBN No.:
978 1 873124 51 2
Published:
2011
Product:
Rickergate/70000/C
 

This is the excavation report on two small excavations in Carlisle with evidence of Roman lead processing at Botchergate, together with remains of a cremation cemetery. The Rickergate site produced significant finds of medieval leather deposited in the medieval city ditch. Our knowledge of Carlisle's history has been transformed over the past decade, and these two reports contain accounts of important and recent work not previously published.

Both sites discussed lie just outside and to the east of the medieval city wall, Rickergate revealed evidence of human activity dating to c 4000-2000 BC, as well as traces of Roman timber buildings and a treasure trove of waterlogged remains form the medieval defensive ditches around the city, including shoes in abundance, and a large wood and leather water-carrier of the kind illustrated in the Luttrell Psalter. Botchergate revealed not only Roman burials, including one with a funeral pyre above a grave pit, but also a second-century industrial complex that contained the remains of a large lead-smelting furnace of a kind not previously found in Roman Britain. Together these authoritative and definitive reports demonstrate how much information is still to be found by scrupulously careful archaeological detection, as well as being fascinating and highly readable accounts in their own right.

138 pages, 54 figures, 30 plates, 17 tables. Softback with 4 colour cover 210x295x10mm. CARR series vol 2.

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The Church Notes of Sir Stephen Glynne for Cumbria (1833-1872)
Author:
Lawrence Butler, editor
Category:
Local history
Price:
£16.00
ISBN No.:
978-1-873124-52-9
Published:
2011
Product:
ChurchNotes/70000/C
 

Sir Stephen Glynne (1807-1874) was one of the greatest church enthusiasts of his time, visiting over 5500 churches in England and Wales, and making careful notes and sketches of their architecture, plans and furnishings. His particular interest lay in the Gothic style and in High Church principles, as his notes make clear. This volume contain architectural descriptions of 50 churches in the modern Cumbria (Cumberland, Westmorland, Furness), which were inspected between 1833 and 1872 in 10 or 11 visits, varying from a single night to a fortnight.

Interesting in their own right, they also provide an extremely accurate and valuable record of the fabric and fittings before their removal in restoration or in the total demolition of churches. An introduction places Sir Stephen's life and work in the wider context of developing architectural and ritual scholarship. The text is accompanied by 60 contemporary watercolours, drawings and early photographs, the majority from record sources and published for the first time. Usually the artist or photographer shows the exterior of a church in its landscape setting, but there are engravings of interiors for urban churches and five former monasteries. Together they provide a significant contribution to the study of church architecture in Cumbria at a time of rapid change.

Before his retirement Lawrence Butler taught medieval archaeology in the universities of Leeds and York. He sat on two diocesan committees and served as archaeological consultant to four cathedrals. In 2007 he published Sir Stephen Glynne's Yorkshire Church Notes.

Paperback, 143 pages, 60 figures, 175x250x10mm. CWAAS Extra Series, Vol XXXVI.

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Index to Nicolson and Burn`s History and Antiquities of the counties of Westmorland and Cumberland
Author:
Edited by H. Hornyold-Strickland
Category:
Local history
Price:
£17.00
ISBN No.:
978 1873124 53 6
Published:
2011
Product:
NBindex/70000/C
 

This is a reprint of the index to Nicolson & Burns' History and Antiquities of the Counties of Westmoreland and Cumberland, published in 1777.  The two-volume History was published without an index and this index, compiled by H. Hornyold-Strickland, was originally published with a very short print-run in 1934. The reprint has been produced in a plain cover and at a size which allows it to be rebound to match copies of the original book.  vi and 167 pages. No illustrations218x293x14mm. CWAAS Extra Series vol XVII.

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The Vikings and Victorian Lakeland: the Norse medievalism of W.G. Collingwood and his contemporaries
Author:
Matthew Townend
Category:
Local history
Price:
£35.00
ISBN No.:
978-1-873124-50-5
Published:
2011
Product:
Vikings/70000/C
 

In the nineteenth century the writers, artists and antiquarians of the Lake District began to study the literature and culture of the Vikings, and to trace many of the region's distinctive features back to the Norse settlements. This enthusiasm for Lakeland's Viking origins expressed itself in scholarship and fiction, in painting and sculpture, in saga-translations and travels to Iceland. This regional movement formed part of a wider national interest in the Vikings and their literature, an interest fuelled variously by philology, politics, and historicism. The leading figure in the study of the Vikings in Lakeland was the artist and author William Gershom Collingwood (1854-1932), but other contributors ranged from Thomas De Quincey and Canon Rawnsley to Beatrix Potter and Arthur Ransome. In terms of both scholarly and popular awareness the 'Norse medievalism' of Collingwood and his contemporaries still shapes the ways in which we view both the impact of the Vikings in England and the Lake District's particular history and inheritance.

The Vikings and Victorian Lakeland offers the first-ever detailed examination of the study of the Vikings and their culture in the Lake District, in the period c. 1850- 1930. It does this by concentrating - by no means exclusively, however - on the life and work of W.G. Collingwood, and it is the first book to be written about this important and influential figure.

Matthew Townend is Senior Lecturer in English at the University of York. His previous books include Language and History in Viking Age England (2002).

Hardback: 9 colour plates; 50 black & white images, 352 pp, 180x250x30mm. CWAAS Extra Series XXXV.

 

 

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The Making of Carlisle : From Romans to Railways
Author:
M.Brennand and K.J.Stringer (Editors)
Category:
Local history
Price:
£12.00
ISBN No.:
978-1-873124-50-5
Published:
2011
Product:
MakingCarlisle/70000/C
 

Much of Carlisle's 2,000-year history has been based on its military and political importance, due especially to the colonising power of the Romans and the Normans, and the needs of national defence against the Scots during the later Middle Ages. After the end of hostilities, the city slowly transformed itself from a small-scale manufacturing and market centre into the bustling industrial and railway hub in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

The contributors to this book have used their expertise as archaeologists and historians to provide an up-to-date, attractively illustrated and readily accessible account of the major themes of continuity and change that marked the experiences of Carlisle and its inhabitants. The city's exceptionally rich heritage deserves to be better known and understood, and this book will interest all who wish to learn more about the history of Carlisle and its place as the regional capital of Cumbria.

Paperback. 198pp, 131 illustrations, 170x245x14mm. CWAAS Extra Series XXXV.

 

 

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A Roman, Anglian and Medieval Site at Blackfriars Street, Carlisle
Author:
M R McCarthy
Category:
Local history
Price:
£22.00
ISBN No.:
978-1-873124-00-7
Published:
1990
Product:
Blackfriars/70000/C
 

This publication examines in detail the series of excavations undertaken by the Carlisle Archaeological Unit between July 1977-July 1978 of a major site in the Blackfriars Street area of Carlisle which was due for redevelopment.  It comprises major sections on the structural sequence from Roman to post-medieval periods, the small finds (including flint, stone, Roman coins, copper, silver, glass and medieval objects etc), pottery (Roman, Samian Ware, Mortaria, Anglo-Saxon to post-medieval pottery), and the economic, environmental and human remains (soil profile, insect remains, botanical remains, vertebrate remains and mollusc shells, human remains).

Softbound, 387pp, 242 figures, 5 microfiche, 185x245x28mm. CWAAS Research Series vol IV.

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The Boke of Recorde of Kirkbie Kendall
Author:
R S Ferguson
Category:
Local history
Price:
£22.00
ISBN No.:
978-1-873124-34-5
Published:
2001
Product:
BokeofRecorde/70000/C
 

This modern edition of 2001 is a reprint of the classic CWAAS publication of 1892 edited by R S Ferguson, with a new introduction by C B Phillips. It publishes the most significant portions of the 'Boke of Recorde' of the Corporation of Kendal, a large manuscript volume held by the Cumbria Archive Centre in Kendal. The volume contains copies of the three royal charters of 1575, 1637 and 1684 which established the Corporation and its mayor, alderman and burgesses. It also listed some 1500 householders in Kendal in 1576, together with their contributions to obtaining the charter of 1575. Lists of the officials of the Corporation are also given into the mid 17th century (and in the case of Mayors of Kendal up to 1710). It also lists several hundred freemen and apprentices of the companies or gilds of Kendal, enrolled before the burgesses between 1571 and 1645, and orders made by the Corporation pertaining to them. These comprised, among others reflecting the importance of the wool trade to Kendal at this time, the Chapmen, Merchants, Salters, Shearmen, Fullers, Dyers, Websters, Mercers and Drapers (linen and woollen), Tailors, Embroiderers, Tanners, Girdlers, Curriers, Armorers, Hardwaremen, Butchers, Smiths, Clothmakers, Innkeepers, Scriveners. There are also details of benefactors and gifts to the Corporation for poor relief and to the Kendal Grammar School. The publication has a full combined name and place index.

The book will be particularly relevant for those interested in the history of Kendal, early modern social and administrative history and those with an interest in genealogy.

Hardbound, xi + 438pp, 150x230x30mm. CWAAS Extra Series vol VII.

 

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Brougham Castle, Cumbria
Author:
Henry Summerson, Michael Trueman and Stuart Harrison
Category:
Local history
Price:
£13.00
ISBN No.:
1-873124-25-2
Published:
1998
Product:
Brougham/70000/C
 

Brougham Castle, near Penrith in Cumbria, is a very striking ruin on a very old site. Begun by Robert de Vieuxpoint, a favourite of King John in the early thirteenth century, it was to serve from the first a double function: to protect and dominate its founder's lordship in Westmorland and to strengthen the defences of England's border with Scotland. Although it played its part in national affairs and was twice the scene of hospitality for Kings (Edward I in 1300 and James I in 1617), it was never a royal fortress. But it did hold an important place in the second line fo the defences of northern England. The castle was also a point for the exercise and protection of aristocratic influence and a symbol of the power and permanence of its lords. Above all the castle would be associated with the Cliffords. In their hands it was a centre of one of the most important baronies in the north of England and more locally it was the hub of a valuable estate. Perhaps most famously Brougham would become one of the five castle restored in the mid seventeenth century by Lady Anne Clifford, dowager countess of Pembroke, Dorset, and Montgomery (1590-1676).

In 1984 English Heritage commissioned Lancaster University Archaelogical Unit  to record the fabric of the Castle, which had been in state guardianship since 1928 but had received little previous research. This survey was to be supported by related studies of the Castle's history, environment and records. The results of all these works were combined to produce this monograph. The book includes chapters on the history of the Castle, its earthworks, geology, standing fabric with appendices on documentary evidence and pictorial sources, 19th and 20th century repair works and also includes a list of manuscript sources, a bibliography and index.

Soft cover, 173pp, 67 figures and black and white plates, 210x295x8mm. CWAAS Research Series vol VIII.

New price! Reduced from £30.
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The Building of Hadrian`s Wall
Author:
C E Stevens
Category:
Local history
Price:
£6.00
ISBN No.:
978-1-873124-15-4
Published:
1966
Product:
BuildingWall/70000/C
 

This book is expands the original Horsley Lecture given by C E Stevens on Hadrian's Wall in 1947.  It includes chapters on 'How the wall was built', 'Dislocation and its causes', 'the Vallum Decision', 'Legionary Gangs', 'Trouble in the Province', 'The building of Curtains', 'The Central Sector', 'The Closing Stages' and 'The Turf Wall'. It also includes appendices of a check list of 'Centurial Stones', Legionary Inscriptions, Census of Chort Stones etc 

Paperback, 141pp, 140x215x10mm. CWAAS Extra Series vol XX. 

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The Roman Waterlogged Remains and Later Features at Castle Street, Carlisle
Author:
M R McCarthy
Category:
Local history
Price:
£12.00
ISBN No.:
978-1-873124-02-4
Published:
1991
Product:
CastleStreet/70000/C
 

This relatively short monograph provides a synthesis of a fruitful and fascinating investigation of an area in the city centre of Carlisle demolished for redevelopment.  This was 32-40 Castle Street, excavated by the Carlisle Archaeological Unit between June 1981-April 1982.  This monograph conveys a summary of the main findings, taking account of specialist contributions and including some illustrated finds as well as placing the site within its wider context within Carlisle. The microfiche appendices included with the volume contain the complete evidence also originally published in four fascicules.  These give a full catalogue of the structural sequence, environmental remains and finds which included a rich collection of metalwork, glass and stone objects, wooden, leather and bone object and Roman pottery.

Softbound, 81pp, 42 figures, 27 plates. 6 microfiches, . 210x295x7mm. CWAAS Research Series vol V.

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The Cumbrian Parishes 1714-1725 from Bishop Gastrell`s Notitia
Author:
L.A.S. Butler, editor
Category:
Local history
Price:
£17.00
ISBN No.:
1-873124-24-4
Published:
1998
Product:
CumbParishes/70000/C
 

This volume contains the material collected by Francis Gastrell (Bishop of Chester 1714-1725) about the Cumbrian parishes within his diocese. His 'Notitia' or notebook of the diocese is a mine of information about parishes, townships, schools and charities, and the sections relating to Cumberland and Westmorland were previously unpublished. The volume gives a vivid picture of the parishes in the four deaneries of Copeland, Furness, Kendal and Lonsdale during the reign of George I. A full list of clergy 1714-1725 is included for each parish. The 'Notitia' was also used by Bishop Porteus to make notes preliminary to his Primary Visitation in 1778. His additions and the contents of a copy intended for the Registrar of Richmond are given in an appendix, which also draws upon the surviving records from the Visitation of 1778. The introduction includes a review of the circumstances surrounding production of the 'Notitia', an examination of the careers of Bishop Gastrell and Dr Stratford, his Archdeacon of Richmond.

Before his retirement Lawrence Butler taught medieval archaeology in the universities of Leeds and York. He sat on two diocesan committees and served as archaeological consultant to four cathedrals. He published the volumes of Church Notes of Sir Stephen Glynne for Yorkshire and for Cumbria in 2007 and 2011.

Hardback, 259pp , 6 illustrations, 195x255x25mm. CWAAS Record Series, Vol XII.

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Records Relating to the Barony of Kendale volume 1
Author:
W.Farrer & J.F.Curwen
Category:
Local history
Price:
£22.00
ISBN No.:
978-1-873124-26-0
Published:
1998
Product:
KendalBarony1/70000/C
 

This is a modern reprint of volume one of a classic trilogy of publications about the Barony of Kendal, published by the CWAAS in the 1920s.  Each volume is divided into chapters on the parishes and townships which made up the Barony, with illustrative extracts of documents relating to each community from the twelth century to the late seventeenth century. The documents include items from privately held estate archives such as those at Levens Hall and Sizergh Castle, those calendared in monastic cartularies, manorial rentals, state documents such as Patent Rolls, Close Rolls, Inquisitions Post Mortem, Feet of Fines and lists of those paying the Hearth Tax in 1669.

Volume one covers the following areas: Kendal, Helsington, Sizergh, Natland, Scalthwaiterigg, Hay, Hutton in the Hay, New Hutton, Old Hutton, Docker, Lambrigg, Dillicar, Grayrigg, Whinfell, Bannisdale, Fawcet Forest, Selside and Whitwell, Skelmsmergh and Patton, Strickland Roger, Strickland Ketel, Longsleddale, Kentmere, Staveley, Crook and Winster, Underbarrow, Bradley Field and Cunswick.  There is a full combined name and place index.

The volume will appeal to all those with an interest in local or family history for these areas in medieval and early modern times.  

Hardbound, 476pp, 150x230x30mm. CWAAS Record Series vol IV.

 

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Records Relating to the Barony of Kendale volume 2
Author:
W Farrer & J F Curwen
Category:
Local history
Price:
£22.00
ISBN No.:
978-1-873124-27-7
Published:
1999
Product:
KendalBarony2/70000/C
 
This is a modern reprint of volume two of a classic trilogy of publications about the Barony of Kendal, published by the CWAAS in the 1920s and compiled by the historian Dr William Farrer and edited after his death in 1924 by the architect and antiquarian John F Curwen.  Each volume is divided into chapters on the parishes and townships which made up the Barony, with illustrative extracts of documents relating to each community from the twelth century to the late seventeenth century. The documents include items from privately held estate archives such as those at Levens Hall and Sizergh Castle, those calendared in monastic cartularies, manorial rentals, state documents such as Patent Rolls, Close Rolls, Inquisitions Post Mortem, Feet of Fines and lists of those paying the Hearth Tax in 1669.

Volume two covers the following areas: Grasmere, Rydal and Loughrigg, Langdale and Baisbrowne, Ambleside and Troutbeck, Undermilbeck, Applethwaite and Winster, Crosthwaite and Lyth, Levens, Heversham and Milnthorpe, Hincaster, Sedgwick, Stainton, Preston Richard, Beetham, Haverbrack and Arnside, Witherslack, Meathop and Ulpha, Farleton, Burton, Holme, Preston Patrick, Kirkby Lonsdale, Casterton, Hutton Roof, Lupton, Barbon, Mansergh, Middleton, Killington and Firbank.

There is a full combined name and place index.The volume will appeal to all those with an interest in local or family history for these areas in medieval and early modern times.Hardbound, 514pp, 150x230x30mm. CWAAS Record Series vol V.
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The Estate and Household Accounts of Sir Daniel Fleming of Rydal Hall, Westmorland, 1688-1701
Author:
Blake Tyson, editor
Category:
Local history
Price:
£15.00
ISBN No.:
1-873124-33-3
Published:
2001
Product:
Fleming/70000/C
 

Sir Daniel Fleming (1633-1701) was a major figure in the public life of late 17th century Westmorland. He had succeeded his father in the Rydal Hall Estate (which included the Manors of Coniston, Skirwith and Beckermet) in 1653 at the age of 19. After a brief education at Oxford and the Inns of Court in London, he married Barbara Fletcher in 1655, the sister of Sir George Fletcher of Hutton Hall, Penrith, and had a large family of 11 children. He filled many public offices in his life, including High Sheriff of Cumberland, MP for Cockermouth, and Justice of the Peace for Cumberland, Westmorland and Lancashire, and was knighted in 1681.

A man of great intelligence and learning, immense curiosity and boundless energy, he was also an enthusiastic antiquarian and recorded virtually everything he did and saw. His manuscripts are a treasure trove of material for the history of Westmorland. None more so than his estate and household account books. This volume presents a complete edition of the text of the second account book covering the last period of Sir Daniel's life from June 1688 up to just before his death on 25 March 1701 (extracts from the period 1656-1688 were published in 1903 and 1913). The volume gives a detailed, important and fascinating insight into the social and economic background of 17th century Cumbria. years. It brief biographies of the principal figures in the accounts, and a full glossary and index.

Hardback with dust jacket, xxvi+401pp, 200x255x35mm. CWAAS Record Series vol XIII.

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The Diary of Isaac Fletcher of Underwood, Cumberland, 1756-1781
Author:
Angus Winchester, editor
Category:
Local history
Price:
£15.00
ISBN No.:
1-873124-20-1
Published:
1994
Product:
Fletcher/70000/C
 

Isaac Fletcher (1714-1781), a Quaker yeoman, lawyer and merchant, kept a daily record of his activities for a quarter of a century. His life centred on the seasonal rhythm of farming at Underwood, near Cockermouth, but he was also heavily involved in trade and industry, as a partner in a stocking factory in Cockermouth, a prospector for lead locally and in Galloway; and an importer of plumbago from America. The diary also records his legal work and chronicles the life of the local Quaker community during the inward-looking, Quietist period in the history of the Society of Friends.

Fletcher's diary is a remarkable document of social history, shedding fresh light on many aspects of rural life in the eighteenth century. This edition of the complete text, with an introduction and substantial supporting material, makes available an important new primary source for students of English social and agrarian history.

Hardback with dust jacket, xlii+518pp, 205x255x45mm. CWAAS Extra Series vol XXVII.

New price! Reduced from £36.
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The Medieval Cross Slab Grave Covers in Cumbria
Author:
Peter Ryder
Category:
Local history
Price:
£17.00
ISBN No.:
1-873124-40-6
Published:
2005
Product:
CrossSlabs/70000/C
 

This is a complete illustrated and annotated list of the extant grave-covers, bearing a cross not an effigy, in Cumbria. Widely distributed, often misunderstood, frequently neglected, and sometimes wilfully destroyed, such grave-covers are an important class among medieval memorials. Canon R. Bower recognised their importance nearly a century ago, when he published a list of 'Grave-Slabs in the Diocese of Carlisle' in the Transactions of this Society for 1907, 1909 and 1912. Since then, some slabs have been lost, others discovered, and their study has advanced greatly, not least by the present author's work. Peter Ryder is an expert in this field. He has already published similar studies for Durham, East Yorkshire and Cumberland.

Grave-covers without effigies come from all centuries from the eleventh to the sixteenth, but they were most popular in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Dating them is a challenge to the historian and the archaeologist, because they rarely have inscriptions and commonly appear out of their original context. What is needed is primarily a sensitive assessment of style. Besides the crosses themselves, many slabs carry emblems.What do they mean? Do they indicate sex, or occupation? These questions are discussed. There is a drawing of each monument. The accompanying text can be followed easily by those with a general interest in the past, as well as by specialists. There are maps and grid references to show where the monuments are, and an index.

Cumbrian parish churches preserve the outline of the past, but nineteenth-century and earlier restorers drastically altered most of them, inside and out. It requires a considerable effort of the imagination, and not a little study, to understand what a medieval church looked like and what went on in it. This book is an invaluable clue in the puzzle to understand what it was like to go to church in the Middle Ages.

Case bound with jacket. 190x255x20mm. 224pp, 560 line drawings, four black and white photographs. CWAAS Extra Series vol XXXII. 

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Murus ille famosus (that famous wall)
Author:
William D Shannon
Category:
Local history
Price:
£6.50
ISBN No.:
978-1-873124-45-1
Published:
2008
Product:
Murus/70000/C
 

This attractive and informative short publication presents and discusses depictions and descriptions of Hadrian's Wall before Camden in the late sixteenth century. It begins with three early medieval historians, Gildas (c540), Bede (731) and Nennius (c796) before moving to the accounts of the post-conquest chroniclers such as Geoffrey of Monmouth, Henry of Huntingdon and William of Malmesbury, all writing in the early twelfth century. Later medieval chroniclers such as Ranulph Higden in the fourteenth century and John Hardyng in the fifteenth are covered, before a major section on the fifteenth and sixteenth century humanists, such as Hector Boece and Polydore Vergil, rediscovering classical literature on Hadrian's Wall. The publication also includes fifteen colour illustrations of early maps showing the Wall with accompanying descriptions.

Softback with full colour cover, 64pp, 145x210x5mm. CWAAS Tract Series vol XXII

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The Parish Registers of St. James, Burton in Kendal 1653-1837
Author:
Peter Gaskins, editor
Category:
Local history
Price:
£15.00
ISBN No.:
978-1-873124-42-0
Published:
2004
Product:
Burton/70000/C
 

This complete transcription and edition of the Burton parish registers has been prepared by Peter Gaskins, local historian and resident of the town, with great care and attention to detail from the original registers now deposited in the safe keeping of the Cumbria Archive Centre, Kendal. All surviving entries of baptisms, marriages and burials from 1653 up to 1837 have been checked against the bishop's transcripts (contemporary annual copies sent to the Bishop of Chester from 1676 and to the Diocesan Registrar from 1813). The volume is fully indexed and also contains the first complete and accurate list of vicars and churchwardens of the parish. The entries cover not only the market town of Burton itself, but also the four townships of Burton, Dalton, Preston Patrick and Holme into which the parish was divided, together with Holmescales (a hamlet in Old Hutton which belonged ecclesiastically to Burton parish). The chapel at Preston Patrick was consecrated and made parochial in 1701, but its baptism, marriage and burial entries were included in the Burton registers from 1703.
This first parish register volume to be published by the Society for over 30 years represents an important opening up of source material of the later 17th, 18th and early 19th centuries for the south of the county (only Crosthwaite and Lyth, Middleton in Lonsdale and part of Kendal having been published previously). This will principally benefit family historians and genealogists, but also enable social and economic conditions and demographic trends to be studied in depth by both local and regional historians. Burton's market, established in 1661, took full advantage of its situation astride the main route north from Lancaster to Kendal (with the establishment of the turnpike in 1753) and became the most extensive corn market in the county in the 18th century, only declining after the opening of the Canal in 1819. The period covered by the parish registers therefore is one of the most significant and expansive in its history.

Paperback, 416pp, 140x210x30mm. CWAAS Record Series vol XVIII. 

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The Websters of Kendal: A North-Western Architectural Dynasty
Author:
Angus Taylor, edited by Janet Martin
Category:
Local history
Price:
£40.00
ISBN No.:
978-1-873124-41-3
Published:
2004
Product:
Websters/70000/C
 

This volume reflects the long and patient research of Angus Taylor into the Webster family and their architectural commissions through three generations. His is the first comprehensive study of this regional dynasty, whose origins were as a firm of stonemasons - as is amply evidenced in the outstanding quality of the stonework in their buildings. Noble public buildings, churches, banks, smaller houses and mansions, as well as structures such as bridges, throughout a vast area have survived as witness to their capabilities and inspiration.

Case bound with full colour jacket & page marker, 400pp, 190x250x32mm. CWAAS Record Series vol XVII

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