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Stories from around the county about local people
February 1918
  • 5th: Ship carrying US troops sunk by submarine off Irish coast
  • 9th: Central Powers sign peace treaty with Ukraine
  • 13th: French and American joint thrust in Champagne
  • 16th: Dover shelled by German submarine
  • 17th: German air raid on London; 21 killed
  • 21st: Jericho taken by British forces
  • 26th: British hospital ship sunk by sub in the Bristol Channel. 153 missing
The First World War in Cumbria day by day
TODAY

01 July 1917

A public service in connection with the dedication of the memorial Cross to the memory of the Fellside Fallen Soldiers will be held at Tea Well, Fellside today at 3:15pm. Dedication by the Right Rev The Bishop of Barrow. Admission by ticket only.

02 July 1917

Dominion Day, Canadian National Holiday. A great baseball match will be played at Brunton Park Football Ground at 3pm, between RIDDINGS JUNCTION and ORTON PARK CANADIAN CAMPS. Nine men aside. Noted players in both teams Admission - Gentlemen 1s, Ladies 6d ,Soldiers in Uniform 6d. Proceedings to Border Prisoners of War Fund.

03 July 1917

03.07.1917 LOST, between MARYPORT and Workington, PENDANT, containing Photo of Soldier killed in action, - Finder rewarded on returning to Police Station

04 July 1917

The Cumberland and Westmorland Appeal Tribunal sat in Carlisle this week.  The Military Representative appealed against the exemption of David Clark, employed as a carter by the Carlisle Corporation. Clark is thirty-six years of age, married and has six children, the eldest of whom is twelve. He is Class A, and his duties include the collection of household refuse. The Military Representative said this work was done at Whitehaven by men over military age. The Chairman commented - It is the sea air at Whitehaven. The Military Representative replied - No, common sense. Mr Hill, Chief Sanitary Inspector for Carlisle, said this man had been in employment for twenty years. He had thirty-four employed in his department and only four were of military age. The appeal was allowed.

05 July 1917

Cruiser HMS Curlew launched at Barrow.  [Scrapped 1940].

06 July 1917

Submarine HMS L2 launched launched at Barrow. [Scrapped 1930].

07 July 1917

Levens Gardens will be open to the public on Thursday and Saturday afternoons, between the hours of 1 and 5:30 pm. Admission Adults 6d, Children 3d. No charge will be made to Residents in Levens and Heversham, or to Soldiers in Uniform.

08 July 1917

This  evening at Tebay Church a stained glass window to the memory of Private J Thistlewood, Tebay, was dedicated by the Rev J Whitmore. The window, which has been erected at the west end of the church, has for its subject Christ blessing little children. A brass plaque bears the inscription 'This window is dedicated to the glory of God, and in loving memory of Private John Thistlelwood, Northumberland Fusiliers, who  died of wounds received in France, September 18th 1916, aged 22 years. Erected by his brother and sisters'.

09 July 1917

Submarine HMS M1 launched  at Barrow. [Rammed and sunk 1925].

10 July 1917

Westmorland Women's War Agricultural Committee have arranged for demonstrations of fruit and vegetable bottling and preservation to be given  today in Kendal Town Hall at 2:30pm.

 

11 July 1917

The Holme Cultram Tribunal was held today in Abbey Town. An application for exemption was made by Thomas Jackson, Forrester's Arms Inn, Causewayhead, described as an innkeeper and mole catcher who is 36 and married. He stated in support of his appeal that he had caught 2,000 moles this year. The application was disallowed, applicant not to be called up until August 31st.

12 July 1917

At the Grasmere Military Tribunal this week Miss F Kirkby applied for a recommendation for her nephew, John Kirkby, under gardener at Lancrigg, 21, to be examined by the Central Medical Board at Leeds on the ground that the decision of the Board at Carlisle was given without due examination. Dr Johnson certified that he had known and attended Kirkby all his life. He would be useless both mentally and physically under the strain of military life. He was rejected as unfit for military service at Ambleside on November 15th 1915. The military representative assented to his being examined by the Central Medical Board.

13 July 1917

Lance Corporal Jonathan Whitehead Mason of the 21st Division Cyclist Company, Army Cyclist Corps, who was declared  no longer physically fit for  war service on 19.06.1916, committed suicide this day at his home in Lonsdale Road, Millom. He was 22 years of age.

14 July 1917

Second Lieutenant Maurice Fairbairn, Royal Lancaster Regiment, and two other officers were killed by a shell whilst asleep in their dugout about 2am on Saturday July 7th. In a letter to his mother at Barrow his Commanding Officer says - 'Your son was a reliable and plucky lad and can be ill spared.' Before enlisting in January last year deceased was in the office of Messrs WB Peat and Co, chartered accountants, Barrow.

15 July 1917

Owing to the war the Keswick Convention is not being held this year.

16 July 1917

WANTED, for the duration of the war, or until the present holder returns, an Experienced CLERK, either ineligible male or lady, for General Office. Applications, stating age, salary required, experience, and references, will be received by first post on Friday 13th. - Committee, Co-Operative Society LTD, Egremont, Cumberland.

17 July 1917

Women Workers on the Land for Silloth and District. The Labour Department of the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries has now completed arrangements for supplying female labour on the land for Silloth and District. They have appointed Miss Barnes, Blitterlees, as village registrar, and Mrs Carter Wood, Skinburness Towers, as district representative. It is requested that all applications should be made to these ladies.

18 July 1917

Arrangements are being made by the Old Beghians Club to hold a meeting shortly for the purpose of considering the 'provision of a permanent war memorial of Old St Beghians who have fallen in the war.' A proposition will be submitted to the meeting by the President of the Club that a fund be raised, having for its objects (a) the erection of a permanent memorial and record at the School; (b) the provision of an endowment for the education at St Bees School of the sons or brothers of Old St Beghians who have fallen or been incapacitated in the war.

19 July 1917

Death of Private JW Pritt of Corney. Mr and Mrs Myles Pritt, Far Bank, Corney, have received word of the death of their second son, Private Joseph W Pritt, of the Lancashire Fusiliers, which took place on July 19th in France, from shrapnel wounds. He was educated at Waberthwaite and Millom Secondary Schools. After leaving School he was apprenticed to Mr E Woodall, grocer, Waberthwaite. When he joined his group he was just 18. [West Cumberland Times 4th August 1917].

20 July 1917

One hundred and twenty six casualties from the hospital ship Kalyan which had docked at Southampton arrived in Carlisle aboard a hospital train today. The casualties were forwarded to the following hospitals: Carlisle Chadwick, Carlisle Murrell Hill, Longtown, Brampton and Englethwaite.

21 July 1917

A novel football match was played on the Whitehaven Cricket Field this afternoon, the teams being Whitehaven Ladies and 'Handicapped' Welsh Fusiliers, the latter having been granted permission to play by Capt. Preston OC. The proceeds of the match were in aid of the Whitehaven District Branch Discharged Soldiers and Sailors. There was a large gathering of spectators. The soldiers eleven were handicapped by having their hands tied behind their backs, whilst the goalkeeper had the use of only one hand. There were many amusing incidents during the game which the ladies won by three goals to two.

22 July 1917

A mass meeting will be held in the Public Park, Carlisle, at 8pm this evening. Mr Charles Derry, DCM, National Organiser of the Federation of Discharged Sailors and Soldiers will address the public. Don't miss hearing this HERO OF MONS. Come in your thousands.

23 July 1917

A North Westmorland girl, whose home was at Warcop, has been sent to prison for four months because, as was explained by her advocate, 'she succumbed to the glitter and glamour of Carlisle'. She went to work at munitions and lodged amidst the glitter and glamour. She forgot her native modesty and respectability, was smitten with the vulgarest of all female vanities - a craving for costly finery- and, by pretending she was somebody else, got goods to the value of between £ 20 to £ 30. She is not the first woman with whose moral constitution the change to munition-making has not agreed.

24 July 1917

It is officially announced that the Minister of Munitions has definitely decided to take possession of Cumberland and Furness Iron Ores Mines immediately, and accordingly the mines will be under the control of the Government for the period of the war.

25 July 1917

Mr Smith Hill  has placed the Agricultural College, Aspatria, at the disposal of the National Services Department as a camp for public school boys doing harvest work. The War Office will provide equipment  for the six weeks the camp will last, and they asked that the Urban Council should charge no rates. At a meeting on Thursday the Council agreed to this.

26 July 1917

Two Military Medals awarded to stretcher bearers in the 5th (West Cumberland) Border Regiment were presented by Colonel HS Mayhew, Commanding the Border Depot, at the Castle, Carlisle, at noon today in the presence of the whole of the troops stationed there. The recipients were Private G Wilson (755),a discharged soldier, who lives at 48, Laconson Street, Workington, and Mr William D Ferguson, 171, Main Street, Parton, the father of the late Private J.Ferguson (240568).

27 July 1917

Whitehaven Women's Day. Patriotic Sale. Mrs Lowndes wishes to THANK all who so vey kindly lent War Relics and other Articles of interest  for Exhibition at the Town Hall, Whitehaven, on Friday July 27th on the occasion of the YMCA Patriotic Sale. The opportunity thus afforded to the Public to view such a unique and interesting Collection was greatly appreciated.

28 July 1917

The number of sand-bags made for use at the front by the boatmen of Bowness on Windermere has now reached between 17,000 and 18,000.

29 July 1917

Ernest Lamb, OUR BOYS' CLOTHIER, King Street, Whitehaven and at Workington.

30 July 1917

The shortage of houses at Barrow. Some idea of the lack of houses at Barrow can be gathered from the fact that last week, when the offices of the Labour Party were opened for the purposes of taking the names of those wanting houses, the place was besieged by women whose husbands were at work.

31 July 1917

A Whitehaven police-constable has just received a field card, which according to the date upon it, was posted at the end of August 1915, by his brother, who was then serving at the Dardanelles, and was killed in France twelve months ago.

01 August 1917

We would advise our customers to purchase their KNITTING WOOL for soldiers' and sailors' socks, as there is sure to be a shortage and higher prices. DO IT NOW. Robinson's, Hosiery Stores, Kendal.

02 August 1917

WESTMORLAND WAR AGRICULTURAL EXECUTIOVE COMMITTEE. Soldiers labour for Harvest. 100 Soldiers will be available for Harvest in Westmorland at the following rate; - Live in, and 3s 6d a day, with 6d per hour overtime after 10 working hours. Applications should be sent in early to the Secretary, 15 Lowther Street, Kendal. NB - It is not now possible to obtain the release of any individual Soldier for Harvest.

03 August 1917

This week the Ulverston News outlined the grave problems of overcrowding in Barrow following the large influx of men and women coming to work in the munitions factories in the town. In 1911 it said the population in Barrow was 64,594 and there were 12,902 houses. In 1917 there was a population of  85,179 and 14,791 houses. Other causes of local unrest were the exorbitant charges for lodgings, the 'cornering' of food rendered easy by Barrow's isolated position and the beer question.

04 August 1917

Today being the third anniversary of the declaration of war, a meeting of the citizens of Carlisle was called by the Mayor to strengthen the hands of the Government in continuing the war. The meeting was held in the Market Square, beginning at half past six in the evening, and was addressed from the steps of the Town Hall. When the Mayor appeared on the steps the crowd was estimated at 5,000 people. The Union Jack was flown and the Band struck up Rule Britannia.

05 August 1917

At Kirkby Lonsdale Parish Church Canon Aswith preached at this morning's service. He said that on the third anniversary of the outbreak of the war it could be truly said that the country had entered into a conflict with clean hands. The cause, as he had said repeatedly, was as just as any cause could be. They thanked God for all the heroism of those who from the nation and empire had taken part in the struggle, but they at home must also play their part in the struggle.

06 August 1917

Married today in the Scotch National Church, Chapel Street, Carlisle, Mr William Hunt and Miss Bryden Wright. The happy pair was the recipients of many handsome presents, including a silver tea service from the officers of Mr Hunt's regiment. The bride-cake was a novel one. As the orthodox sugar icing is now banned, the bride, who is a popular local vocalist known by the name the 'Singing Gypsy', had the cake decorated with favours of satin ribbon and orange blossom, and attached to each was a 'fortune'. Amid much merriment each unmarried guest was invited by her to draw a favour and learn their 'fate'.

07 August 1917

Pte R Thompson, of Alexandra Road, Windermere, who is with the Expeditionary Force in Mesopotamia, and who formerly played football for Windermere and Bowness wrote in the Westmorland Gazette - 'Everything here reminds one of the olden days; a good illustration of it is to be found in the pictures in the Bible showing the Eastern people, and they don't seem to have made much headway. We have made great progress here and I think it will not be much longer; we have got the master of the Turk now, and are pushing him back slowly but surely. The thing we all look forward to is the mail from home, you should see the long faces if there is no letter or paper for us.

08 August 1917

KENDAL TRADESMEN'S ASSOCIATION. IMPORTANT NOTICE. Owing to business difficulties arising from the War, the Tradesmen of Kendal have decided to CLOSE THEIR SHOPS MONDAY AND THURSDAY IN AUGUST WEEK. Alfred Heap, Hon Secretary.

09 August 1917

A Fair will be held on the PROMENADE, BOWNESS ON WINDERMERE, on Thursday August 9th, In aid of YWCA, Armenian Refugees, French Red Cross, Russian Red Cross. A Shetland Pony will be sold by auction. Aunt Sally, Fortune-telling, and other Amusements. Open 1-8pm. Admission Free. Hon Sec Miss Wall, Hazelthwaite, Windermere.

10 August 1917

The Rev JP Williams, curate at Dacre, has been appointed to an Army chaplaincy and leaves Dacre today to take up duty at Ripon; thus both the Vicar and the Curate will be on active service.

11 August 1917

Lieutenant-General Sir Robert Baden-Powell, who was accompanied by Lady Baden-Powell, inspected the Barrow and District Scouts  today at Croft Park, near Furness Abbey. Addressing the boys, the Chief Scout, after complimenting them on their fine appearance, mentioned that  many of them were working on munitions. he asked them to stick to work, and go on sticking to it until they had 'done away with the Old Hun'. The Scouts, after the review gave interesting exhibitions of bridge building etc.

12 August 1917

Public Notice in yesterday's West Cumberland Times. Will the COWARDS who wrote to Gunner J Brew send their Names and Addresses so that he can answer them, and oblige his Wife - Sarah J Brew, Brewery House, Cockermouth.

13 August 1917

Whitehaven Auxiliary Hospital opens.

14 August 1917

Today at The City Picture House, Carlisle. Captain Bruce Bairnsfather's FAMOUS CARTOONS (First Series). Including 'Fragments from France' the 'gloom-dispelling' humour that made 500,000,000 laugh.

15 August 1917

Nearly fifty boys from Uppingham School [Public School in Rutland] have gone into the 'harvest camp' at Cockermouth, and are reported to have been in full work since their arrival. 

16 August 1917

Seventy casualties from the hospital ship Kalyan which had docked at Southampton arrived in Penrith aboard a hospital train today. The casualties were forwarded to the hospitals at Penrith and Greystoke.

17 August 1917

The Speaker of the House of Commons, Mr Lowther [The Penrith MP], has sent a sharp rebuke to Miss ME Waid, Penrith, the secretary of the Cumberland No-Conscription Fellowship, who sent him a resolution passed at meeting of the Fellowship, protesting against 'the persecution of conscientious objectors', and demanding their release from prison and penal conditions as 'contrary  to the principles of liberty and justice, and unnecessary in the interests of the nation'. In reply Mr Lowther said that he has 'no sympathy whatever with men who will make no sacrifice, nor stir a finger to assist their country in its hour of peril, but are content to let others suffer and die for them.'

18 August 1917

Letter home to Mrs Ewbank, Bolton Rectory Mealsgate, dated this day, from their son Walter, Captain in the Border Regiment:
"Dear Mother, Your prayers, I think, have been answered, and I have come through all right. We have had a grand day and took all the objectives allocated to us. …I shot dead five Prussian guardsmen, one of whom was not killed at once, but died in a few moments after we got there. He seemed a  bit fed up about it."

19 August 1917

Lieutenant JP Flynn, son of Hugh Flynn, late of Whitehaven, has been transferred from the Cheshire Regiment to the Royal Flying Corps, and has returned to France to take up his new duties. Miss Hilda Flynn, his sister, left London on August 19th to take up her duties as a VAD nurse in Salonika.

20 August 1917

Cockermouth Theatre and Cinema House. THE TREASURE OF HEAVEN. Absorbing story of a Millionaire who put aside wealth and tramped the country in search of love. Also -  ST DUNSTAN'S Describing the beneficent work at the hostel, for Blinded Soldiers and Sailors.

21 August 1917

WESLEYAN CHURCH, Keswick. This evening the Rev FW MacDonald, ex-president of the Wesleyan Conference lectured in the schoolroom on "Patriotic verse in peace and war'. Quotations were given from many authors, from Shakespeare down to, and including Rudyard Kipling (the lecturer's nephew) Mr Peter Thompson presided over a good audience.

22 August 1917

Cartmel News; Lieut Dixon, who was seriously wounded, is now  making  favourable progress in the hospital in Leicester. A letter has been received by his father, Mr W Dixon, Pitt Farm, Cartmel, from his Commanding Officer, who states 'Your son Lieut Dixon, was badly wounded on July 31st, in our big push. He was hit by several pieces of shell about the legs and lower parts of the body while very gallantly leading his transport forward with ammunition for the second time. He sent on his transport after being wounded and refused to allow any of his men to attend to him. He was bandaged by four German prisoners and I believe carried down by them. I cannot speak too highly of his gallantry'.

23 August 1917

Cockermouth Military Tribunal today. William Baxter, photographer etc, Maryport, asked for a rehearing of his appeal on the ground that he had been unable to get anyone to look after his business. He had three shops and his wife was unable to carry on the business owing to bad health. Application dismissed; not to be called upon until September 30th.

24 August 1917

Last week visitors at Old Hutton had two concerts amongst themselves in aid of wounded soldiers at the VAD Hospital, Kendal. The total proceeds amounted to £ 1 6s 6d, and included the price given for a pike weighing 17 pounds, caught in Killington Reservoir by an angler from Wigan.

25 August 1917

Mr Robert Hannah, Duke Street, Barrow, who received news in the early part of this week that his second son, Second Lieutenant EW Hannah, had been killed at the front, has received a War Office message that his eldest son, Second Lieutenant Robert Hannah, King's Irish Rifles, has been missing since 16th inst. Second Lieutenant Robert Hannah was 21 years of age, and was educated at the Barrow Municipal Secondary School. He was in the Cumberland and Westmorland Yeomanry before getting his commission.

26 August 1917

Christened this day at St Mary's Church, Carlisle, Edith Cavell daughter of William and Mary Matthews,10 Dacre Street, Carlisle.

27 August 1917

The Minister of Munitions, Mr Churchill, accompanied by Mr Kellaway, today met the executive of the Cumberland Iron Ore Miners' Association,  to discuss the demands  made by the miners which have lead to the stoppage of work in the West Cumberland iron ore fields. After full discussion of all the points at issue, a complete settlement was arrived at, which provided for the promotion of certain classes of labourers, and immediate increases to others, based on an additional output. It is understood that the mines will be in full swing again on Monday morning.

28 August 1917

The Bishop of Carlisle in his sermon in Carlisle Cathedral this week criticised in severe terms the Pope's recent Note on the subject of peace. He spoke with great personal respect of the head of the Roman Catholic Church, and did full credit to the motives which had inspired his attempts to persuade the Allied to open up negotiations with the Central Powers, but did not hesitate to denounce in the plainest terms the subject matter of the Pope's missive. The diplomatic reasons which induced the Pope to refrain from any word in denunciation of Germany's crimes and flagrant contempt for humanity and law can be conjectured, but this silence has gravely weakened his moral authority as mediator.

29 August 1917

A memorial service for Sec-Lieut JR Stephenson, Hartley, who was recently killed in France, took place in Kirkby Stephen Church this week. There was a large congregation, including the local volunteers and Boy Scouts. The vicar preached from the words 'Casting all your care upon Him'. He spoke of the high esteem in which the fallen officer was held in the parish and told how, owing to numerous officer casualties, he had gone straight into the trenches after arriving in France from his recent stay in England.

30 August 1917

SUGAR ECONOMY. Eat Carr's Chocolate Dates as part of your daily diet. The sweetness is in the dates. Made only from selected fruit and finest chocolate. 7p per pound. Cars and Co Ltd, Carlisle.

31 August 1917

Carlisle Military Tribunal. At the instance of the Military Representative twenty exemptions were reviewed this week. One of the respondents was John Little, employed chiefly in the delivering of ordered coal for Mr Young. The Military Representative suggested that a substitute might be found and said that in some places women were carrying coal. The Town Clerk: But you cannot get women here and personally I object to women carrying coal. The appeal of the Military Representative was disallowed.

01 September 1917

A report in the Ulverston News on the housing crisis in Barrow. A father and mother and four children (one over sixteen) slept in the same bedroom. They live in a damp and dimly lit cellar in the daytime. For this accommodation (unfurnished) they pay 7 shillings a week. The mother said that they had lived in this fashion for 3 years. In another house thirteen persons, old and young, occupy two small bedrooms. Eight families live in a house of a larger type in Duke Street. It is not uncommon to find sixteen or seventeen persons living in four rooms.

Submarine HMS L3 launched launched at Barrow. [Scrapped 1931].

02 September 1917

Mr T Richardson, MP for the Whitehaven Division, was the chief speaker at an open air meeting held at Wigan Market Square this evening under the direction of the Council of Civil Liberties and the I.L.P.  Mr Richardson, who was subjected to some interruption, said that neither the Allied nor the Central Powers could achieve a decisive victory, and if the working men and women allowed the Imperialists of this country as well as those of France and Germany to fix the policy and to dictate the terms on which the war should be settled they would have to pay the penalty.

03 September 1917

For 6 nights at the Palace, Carlisle. The GRAHAMS in their Marionette and Speciality Act. A Battleship and a Tank in Full Action. The Talk of London. Usual popular prices.

04 September 1917

At today's meeting of Longtown Rural District Council, Mr Monkhouse presiding, the Surveyor (Mr Murray), in a report on the housing accommodation said that there were no empty houses in the district at present. He was of the opinion that at the end of the war fifty new houses would be needed in Longtown. The Chairman thought that the new houses were very much needed, as it was his opinion a quarter of the houses in Longtown were not fit for habitation.

05 September 1917

WORKINGTON IRON AND STEEL COMPANY. Annual meeting of shareholders. Sir John S Randles, MP (Chairman of Directors)  said It was not easy to forecast the future. We all hope for the termination of the war as soon as complete victory can be secured. Pending this the probability is we shall continue during the current year pretty much as during the last two years. What the conditions may be after no man can foresee. Every shareholder must form his own judgement. Meantime it is our duty to continue at the highest efficiency the works under our charge till the Army's return from the war. Then let younger men take up the direction of our national industries, and show to the world that whilst they have been great in war they are no less great in peace (Cheers).

06 September 1917

Instructions were this week received by the Cumberland rural authorities from the War Agricultural Office, that the area of grain to be produced next year must show 75% increase on the amount produced in 1915. The extent of the demand has surprised many practical farmers, who doubt it is possible to meet it. 
 

07 September 1917

Second Lieutenant Edward Cecil Toothill, Durham Light Infantry, only son of Mr ET Toothill, Brook Lea, Barrow, was this week reported killed in action on August 22nd. Lieutenant Toothill who was 20 years of age, receiving his education at Barrow Municipal Secondary School and was articled as a chartered accountant. He volunteered for service on reaching 19 years of age, and entered the Cumberland and Westmorland Yeomanry. He was given a commission, and was gazetted to the Durham Light Infantry. He had been in France about five months.

08 September 1917

In another week the boys from the Repton School, whose services have been available for work on the land for some weeks past, will conclude their stay in camp in the grounds of the secondary school in Brampton. The weather has been very inclement, but whenever possible the majority of the members of the camp did their full six hours work a day. A party of twelve went into Carlisle every day to clear ground for wheat in Clark's nursery gardens. The rest were scattered around the farms near Brampton.

09 September 1917

The 1st Battalion  Cumberland Volunteer Regt. was inspected at Carlisle today by Lieu-Col Haworth, of Ambleside, the new County Commandant, who has succeeded the Earl of Arrol. After the inspection a drum head service was held, at which the Dean of Carlisle, in an address, said this war must be fought to an end. He could not understand how any sensible man could suppose that German repentance, or even the acceptance of terms far less onerous than with justice might be imposed, could be brought about by any other means than decisive military defeat, so decisive that it must convince the most arrogant Junker and the German peasant that 'might is not right'.

10 September 1917

A PARISHIONER'S PROTEST. To the Editor of the Westmorland Gazette. Sir - At the vestry meeting held on Monday 10th September to consider this proposal [concerning the proposed war memorial in Windermere Parish Church], one aspect of the question was not mentioned. It is this: Are the people of Windermere willing that one man (however kind his motive maybe) shall pay the total cost of a memorial to their boys and shall also dictate what form that memorial shall take? I, for one, am not. Let us, rather, decide for ourselves, now or when the war is over, what will be a worthy memorial of our boys, and let us all subscribe to it. If any outsiders care to join us then, they would be welcome to do so - I am etc. ONE OF THE PARISHIONERS.

11 September 1917

Public notice in the West Cumberland Times. NOTICE - I JANE BELL, wife of I Bell, Blacksmith, 81 High Street, Maryport (opposite Post Office), am not the Person Convicted for Receiving Sugar for Jam.

12 September 1917

West Cumberland Times, Cousin's Charley's Children's Corner. Essay competition 'The War', third prize winner EA Hodgson, 30 Asby Road, Asby:
During the last three years and over this terrible war has been raging. A great many soldiers have been killed in this awful war. I have a brother in the Army. He is stationed at Dover at present, but is expecting to go to France soon. My father was in France nearly two years. He was a machine gunner and had many narrow escapes. He had been through many big battles. We were quite expecting him to come on furlough when we got news that he had been accidentally drowned while bathing. In this war there are a great many difficulties.

13 September 1917

The shadow of what is now referred to in the daily newspapers as the 'housing scandal' at Barrow, does not grow less. Organised labour has had its say on the subject, at Barrow itself - in speeches pointed if not practical. One of its spokesmen, with the 'JP' tacked on to his name, stated some startling instances of overcrowding. In one of them forty-nine people were represented as living in a five-roomed house; yet the resolution which the meeting passed was against any ejectment, until one or two thousand new dwellings have been built for the surplus population which Barrow has taken in. The peculiar thing is that none of the authorities in Barrow, civil, industrial or ecclesiastical, ventured publicly and practically to tackle the unsavoury problem until it suddenly burst into scandalous bloom in the report of a special commission.

14 September 1917

The people of Penrith and district have heard with alarm and deep regret that their beautiful Beacon Hill is to be stripped of all its timber towards meeting one of the war needs. The woods covers 311 acres, and rises to a height of nearly 1,000 feet. There are many thousands of trees, a large proportion being ripe for felling. The felling of the trees on the widespread hillside will destroy the beauty spot of the district for many years, but it is recognised that sentiment cannot prevail against the nation's needs.

15 September 1917

The Ministry of Munitions have prohibited the making of STAINLESS-STEEL CUTLERY. Brown's have still a few dozen in stock, but further supplies are unprocurable. Secure your needs while they last. Geo Brown and Co, 14 and 16 Devonshire Street, Carlisle.

16 September 1917

Father Knuckley, Rector of the Church of Our Lady and St Joseph, replied to the recent criticisms of the Bishop of Carlisle on the Pope's Peace Note. With regard to the Bishop's charge of ' facing both ways', Father Knuckley said the Pope was a neutral. Personally he would have been delighted if the Pope had dubbed the Kaiser a ruffian and a robber, but being a neutral he saw both sides of the question, which was very different from facing both ways.  The Pope had to speak to both sides in a way that might induce them to harken. Speaking as a peacemaker, he could not begin by denouncing either party, nor could he say things wholly satisfactory to either.

17 September 1917

The Cumberland and Westmorland Appeal Tribunal sat in Carlisle today. Mr CWA Hodgson, Clerk to the Joint Lunacy Committee, appealed against the decision of the Carlisle Rural Tribunal, who had refused exemption to Absalom Walsh, an attendant at Garlands Asylum. Mr Hodgson said they were 30 attendants short, and they had 128 extra lunatics from Newcastle. They could not spare any more men. The attendants at present were terrified of their lives, and the only men they could get now were men of the broken down class. Conditional exemption was granted as long as Walsh remained in this employment.

18 September 1917

Saturday. Maryport Police Court.  WOMEN'S WARFARE. Margaret Crellin, married, was summoned for assaulting Chrissie Mirehouse, married, on the 3rd September. Mrs Mirehouse, the complainant, living in Bank' Yard, Catherine Street, said her husband has been in the Army for two years. About 10:30 on the morning of 3rd September she was going along the street, and stopped to pick up her child, when the defendant made a rush across the street at her. She got hold of her hair, struck her on the head with a bunch of carrots and then hit her in the face with her fist.

19 September 1917

Lost in Moss Bay [Workington] LONSDALE BADGE [11th Service Battalion, Border Regiment] Keepsake. Finder rewarded. Times Office, Workington.

20 September 1917

Private Isaac Styth, a native of Carlisle attached to the Royal Army Medical Corps, who had been a patient in the Fylde Military Hospital, Kirkham, for five weeks, suffering from complete loss of speech, suddenly found himself able to shout for one of the nursing sisters last weekend and vocal powers are now fully restored.

21 September 1917

Today the local press reported that Private Michael A Barnett, Canadian Infantry, son of Mr W and Mrs Barnett, Kirkbythore, and late of Hackthorpe, has been missing since 15th August.

22 September 1917

This evening Mr and Mrs William David Ferguson, of Parton, were presented with a framed photograph and other gifts to the value of £ 50 by the Cumberland Coal Conciliation Board, their son, Private Joseph Ferguson, who was afterwards killed in action, having won the Military Medal. Mr Fletcher presided, and the presentation was made by Mr T Cape, the miners' agent.

23 September 1917

The Rev H Niven, the newly appointed vicar of Netherton, Maryport, was instituted and inducted to the living on this afternoon by the Bishop of Carlisle. The Bishop said he sometimes heard people say, and he had often read the question "Why does God not stop the war?' Whenever he heard that question he felt certain the questioner had no sense of God at all, or else he would know something of the operations of God, of the way God worked.  How could he stop it? If a man were to put his hand in the fire and it was burned he would never ask why God had not stopped it being burned. It was the law of consequences. It was envy that started the war, and in order to stop the war they must stop envy.

24 September 1917

CARLISLE DAY NURSERY. The committee of the Carlisle Day Nursery having decided to increase the accommodation of the Nursery owing to the larger number of Babies brought there by Munition Workers and others in National Work, will gratefully Receive Subscriptions towards Twenty Cots, costing about 10s 6d each, and Blankets for same. Subscriptions may be sent to LADY GILLFORD, Petteril Bank, Carlisle.

25 September 1917

PRIVATE J.SCOTT DUCKERS. Mr and Mrs Duckers, Wetheral, Carlisle, have received a letter from their son Private J Scott Duckers, who is serving a term  of imprisonment as a conscientious objector in one of HM Prisons, stating that he is 'quite well' and 'going on just as usual'.

26 September 1917

A Carlisle man who fought with the 2nd Border Battalion in their heroic resistance to much larger forces at Ypres in October 1914, has been restored to his wife and family physically wrecked as the result of his treatment in a German prison camp. Though he has been a year in Switzerland, with every aid to his recovery, he remains a victim of rheumatism and sciatica, and has been discharged as medically unfit for the Army.

27 September 1917

Saturday. To the editor of the Westmorland Gazette - Sir, I find so many people who desire to make damson jam do not know how to use what little sugar is available to the best advantage. I therefore send you some tested recipes and hope they may be useful to your readers and that they will tell their neighbours. Wartime damson jam; - To one pound of fruit use one quarter pound of sugar, quarter pound glucose or corn sugar, or sugarene, and two to three ounces of run honey. Boil as usual. Honey is twice as sweetening as sugar and makes a rich 'mellifluous' flavour.

28 September 1917

A public notice in the local press today ; FROM BELGIAN REFUGEES. On leaving the neighbourhood of Carlisle and Wetheral, we should like to express to the Committee of Wetheral and all friends our great and very sincere thanks for all the kindness that we have received during our stay. The sympathy and friendship which we found in the time of our great trouble helped us a great deal to bear up against our misfortune, and we shall always feel deeply grateful for the many marks of sympathy shown to us. As it is not in our power to express in other ways our gratitude, we take this opportunity of saying that we shall always remember and feel grateful to those who have befriended us. Yours very sincerely Mr and Mrs Verveecken and family.

29 September 1917

Today, in the presence of several thousand people in the Market Square, Egremont, Cumberland, a presentation was made to the parents of Private Harry Christian, VC of Low Mill, on behalf of their son-hero, who could not be present. The gifts consisted of a gold watch and chain and War Loan bond for £ 150. Inscribed on the watch was a record of the feat at Quinchy which earned Christian the VC.  He was formerly a farm servant at Silecroft, enlisting in 1911 in the King's Royal Lancaster Regiment. He has been stationed in India, when he left for France in 1914.

30 September 1917

The Bishop of Carlisle, having this summer converted a large part of his beautiful flower garden into vegetable plots, has been able to send a number of consignments to the Fleet. From the Dutch garden alone, originally designed by Sir Joseph Paxton, and commonly filled with bedding plants, he has sent at least 1,000 cabbages and cauliflowers to the Fleet, which have been gratefully acknowledged by the receivers, and the name of the ship or ships, to which they have been consigned, has also been given.

01 October 1917

The funeral of  Private WM Hodgson, ASC (Motor Transport) took place from the house of his parents in law (Mr and Mrs McGill), Havelock Terrace, Workington, this week. The Rev SPL Curwen , Rector of Saint Michael, and the Rev GW Arnold, BA, a former curate of St John's, took part in the burial service. The Commandant (Mrs HE Wilson), the sisters and nurses, and such of the wounded at Backfield Military Hospital (where Private Hodgson died) as could turn out, lined the cemetery walk and encircled the grave. Amongst the wreaths was one from the hospital staff and patients, and another from the deceased's employees in his ironmongery business in Pow Street.

02 October 1917

One hundred and forty casualties from the hospital ship St Andrew which had docked at Dover arrived in Carlisle aboard a hospital train today. The casualties were forwarded to the following hospitals: Carlisle Chadwick, Carlisle Murrell Hill, Longtown, Brampton and Englethwaite

03 October 1917

Friday: Lieutenant Arthur Jones, R.E. Tunnelling Corps, son of Mr B Jones, Keswick, has fallen in action, at the age of 29 years. This is the third son that Mr Jones has lost in the war, one being killed in action in 1915, and a second in 1916.

04 October 1917

The Dean of Carlisle was the preacher at the harvest festival at St Stephen's, Carlisle. He said the war had made us realise the power and importance of the State, yet there remained in many minds a great suspicion of State interference. It was held that any attempt on the part of the State to interfere with the conduct of great business, to regulate profits, wages, prices, and the like would end in ruinous and disastrous failure.  The pressure of the present war had absolutely compelled the State to attempt all sorts of interference with private enterprise, and these disasters had not happened.

05 October 1917

LAVERSDALE SCHOOL GIFTS FOR WOUNDED SOLDIERS. Today, when the school was closed for the Autumn holiday, the children brought a miscellaneous assortment of gifts for the wounded soldiers in St Michael's Hospital, Brampton. These were supplemented by generous contributions of the villagers and residents in the neighbourhood, and the children were able to forward to the hospital several baskets containing eggs, butter, tea, vegetables, fruit cakes etc. In addition to this two farmers have promised potatoes. The money donation, which amounted to nearly £ 2, were expended on cigars, cigarettes, and tobacco. A letter of appreciation and thanks has been received from the Commandant, Mrs Arnott.

06 October 1917

CARLISLE CITIZENS ' LEAGUE. 1/4 AND 2/4 Border in Burmah and India. Third Christmas Fund. This league has arranged to send these BATTALIONS the usual gift of Christmas Puddings. The cost will be £ 60. All Friends of the Men and the Public generally are invited to send SUBSCRIPTIONS to the League Offices, 32 Bank Street, Carlisle.

07 October 1917

Great success has attended the  venture of the Damson Growers' Association in employing women to pick damsons in the Lyth Valley and the Meathop District. No less than 25 women had been brought into Westmorland for this work. The County Council are now employing women on road work - four working on the Shap road and one at Crook. Excellent reports have been received on their work, and visits to the girls prove they are happy and enjoy the life. A movement is also afoot by which a gang of women may be employed in clearing and measuring timber in a plantation near Kendal, and an order has definitely been received for three women to work a motor plough, when the tilling season commences.

08 October 1917

Attractive terms have been placed before Scottish coal miners to induce 700 of them to work in the Cumberland iron ore mines and to raise the output of ore needed for the smelting of hematite pig ore in the furnaces on the North-West Coast by an additional 10,000 tons per week. The terms of employment are very satisfactory and are as follows; 12s 1d per shift, the working pattern is eleven days per fortnight, for which twelve days wages are paid, making the total standard wage for eleven days' work £ 7 5s. The working day is of eight hours.

09 October 1917

HMS Champagne was torpedoed and sunk off the Isle of Man by U-96. [see November 3rd 1917]

10 October 1917

BURTON, Pte T. Mr and Mrs James Burton, The Flags, Cartmel, have received news that their only surviving son, Pte Tom Burton, the King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment, was killed in action in France on the 20th September. His chum, Private Richard S Penny, in a letter says 'Previous to going into action your son and I exchanged our home addresses in case we did not come out again. I am greatly pained to have to write you of his sad end, for he often talked of home and of you. It will be of some satisfaction to you to know he died a very brave man. He was killed instantly, so suffered no pain'. This is the second son Mr and Mrs Burton have lost in the war; Myles was killed in action in France on the 14th August 1915. Pte Tom Burton was for some time the Cartmel correspondent of the 'Westmorland Gazette'.

11 October 1917

HARRISON, Sergt Thomas, Machine Gun Section, Loyal North Lancashire Regt., was wounded on 25th September, in France. He is now in hospital in south Wales, and says he was hit by a shell whilst fighting up Hill 60. His left foot and a forefinger have been amputated, and he is also suffering shell wounds in the body, legs and left arm. He says he is going on well, that his soldering days are finished, but he is pleased to say that if all goes well he will be able to earn his own living. Sergt Harrison was wounded in July of last year by shrapnel in the thigh and arm. He is a son of Mr John Harrison, of Moorgate, Kirkby Lonsdale and is one of three brothers in the forces.  
 

12 October 1917

The Holme Cultural Food Committee have fixed the maximum selling price for butter at 2s 2d per lb, and the maximum price for two months for milk at 1s 3d per gallon, or 5d per quart.

13 October 1917

The Workington Shell Factory and the Cockermouth Ladies' teams met at Lonsdale Park, Workington, this afternoon, in the first semi-final of the Cup competition for local war funds. The public turned up well, and though the weather was inclement it failed to dampen the ardour of the players. The teams were well matched, and the only goal was scored by Miss Pennington, for Cockermouth, in the first half.

14 October 1917

Today The Sunday Chronicle publishes an interview which one to its correspondents has had with Lord Lonsdale on the subject of the Kaiser's visit to Lowther. 'Lord Lonsdale' the writer says ''does not think the Kaiser could have prevented war. He believes it was forced on him. Had there not been a war he is of the opinion there would have been a revolution between the War Party and Peace Party in Germany". In answer to a question whether he had any suspicion that a spy was included in the Kaiser's suite when he visited Lowther, Lord Lonsdale said:- 'I am perfectly certain that there was no question of any spy being with the Kaiser when he came to Lowther'.  The correspondent in conclusion says:- 'It is not known whether the Earl of Lonsdale has retained, renounced or disposed of the Order of the Crown of Prussia which the Kaiser bestowed on him'.

15 October 1917

Carlisle Military Hospital. The conversion of Fusehill Workhouse into a military hospital has now been completed, and it is opened today. It is practically ready for the admission of patients, and the first convoy of wounded is expected almost any day. There is accommodation at Fusehill for 400 patient.s

16 October 1917

Carlisle Munitions Girls Football Club were recently invited to Floriston to play Canadian Lumbermen, whom they defeated by 3 goals to 2. After the game the girls were entertained in the sergeant's mess, following which dancing and games were indulged in, and a very pleasant afternoon and evening were wound up with supper.

17 October 1917

Under the Butter Order the maximum price at which farmers can sell at Penrith is 2s 2d per lb. A dealer from Newcastle turned up at the Penrith market who wanted butter and eggs. He found a farmer's wife who had both; and he entered into an arrangement with her to dodge the maximum. He was to have 9lbs of butter at two shillings per pound , and nine eggs at 7d each. But the market price for the eggs was only 4d. therefore, he was, under false pretences,  paying 2s 3d per pound for the butter. He was fined £ 40 and costs, and the farmer's wife £ 2 and costs. The farmer's wife, when tackled by an inspector, said that she did not see that any harm was done. Of course not. This is the disadvantage of being a farmer's wife in wartime. She is even more innocent than Mother Eve. Eve did murmur - 'The serpent tempted me and I fell:' and a farmer's wife who did not scent something serpentine in the proposal of the dealer from Newcastle must be dense indeed

18 October 1917

The committee in the eight sub-districts into which Westmorland has been divided for the purposes of getting extra land ploughed for next year's food crops are not all meeting with the same degree of success or with as much success as must be secured if the county is to do its duty in this matter. The total ploughing required, beyond that was done last year, is 12,000 acres. Towards this increase one-third - 4,000 acres - has been undertaken in the West Ward alone, an agreeable proof of willingness and enterprise in that district. In the Kendal rural district there is a deficiency of nearly one-half in comparison with what was expected; the same in the Lunesdale and Milnthorpe districts. In the Lake District the results have been more gratifying. In the Kendal urban area there is still a considerable deficiency and the total result is that out of 12,000 acres wanted undertakings have not been given for more than two-thirds. This represents a serious shortage; and time is getting on. Stubble ploughing is beginning and a much larger proportion of it than usual ought to be got through before winter sets in. Next month ley ploughing is due; the quantity of the work accomplished before the autumn season ends in this part of the country might also, with advantage, be largely increased.

19 October 1917

Two Kendal confectioners have this week had to pay the costs of a prosecution for selling 'maids of honour' in contravention of the Cake and Pastry Order. Why they should have chosen to provoke a summons by displaying this particular form of confection is best known to themselves. But it is melancholy to reflect that they may have been the means of putting a ban upon 'maids of honour' throughout the district. For obviously a cake which cannot lawfully be exposed for public sale cannot be conscientiously made and eaten in private, for personal gratification This is a point which ought to be made by authority as often as such prosecutions occur. When it is not made, in fact, the principle of the Cake and Pastry Order is overlooked or neglected.

20 October 1917

Corporal Jackson Tyson, King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment, formerly a Furness Railway goods clerk, and son of a Barrow steel worker, was today, in the presence of the troops at Walney Island, Barrow, presented with the Distinguished Conduct Medal by Colonel Pedley, CB. Corporal Tyson at Monchy in June last successfully resisted against great odds, strong German counter-attacks until reinforcements  arrived.

Submarine HMS H21 launched launched at Barrow. [Scrapped 1926].

21 October 1917

Saturday: The Union Jack Club, Waterloo Road, London, S.E. BORDER BEDROOM, no 93. Dedicated to the Memory of Pte GEORGE RIGG, 11th Borders, killed in action on the Somme, July 1st 1916. Any Sailor or Soldier on the Active List or who has been discharged from the Army or Navy within a period of 48 hours (except those discharged for misconduct), if stranded in London for the night may be booked for the night in No 93 Bedroom, free of charge, and he will be supplied with a Ticket for Supper and Breakfast without payment. Any N.C.O. or Man of the BORDER Regiment will have a prior claim to be accommodated. During the year ending September 19th 1917 89 men have been thus accommodated.

22 October 1917

Tuesday. The 'Church Times' gives the Bishop of Carlisle a smart rap on the knuckles for being out of touch with the habits of wage-earners as to imagine that a letter to the 'Times' was a means of bringing important Church information before them. 'How many copies of that organ,' it enquires, 'does the Bishop find in the hands of the thousands of munitions workers not far from his Cathedral city? Has he ever ridden in London public conveyances in the early morning? It is the kind of episcopal utterance that makes our Bench of Bishops a byword for fatuity in the ranks of labour.'

23 October 1917

Twenty-three casualties from the hospital ships St Patrick and Carisbrooke Castle which had docked at Southampton arrived in Penrith aboard a hospital train today. The casualties were forwarded to the hospitals at Penrith and Greystoke.
 

24 October 1917

Fifty-eight casualties from the hospital ships St Patrick and Carisbrooke Castle which had docked at Southampton arrived in Carlisle aboard a hospital train today. The casualties were forwarded to the following hospitals: Carlisle Chadwick, Carlisle Murrell Hill, Cumberland Infirmary, Longtown, Brampton and Englethwaite.

25 October 1917

The continuance of the war for a third year said Mr J Smart, Hon. secretary to the Workington Grocers' and Provisions' Dealers Association, in his recent report to the annual meeting, had entailed a considerable amount of worry, anxiety, and responsibility in business such as had never been experienced before, but they must accept all this not only without complaint, but with sincere thankfulness that matters were not very much worse. Maximum prices had been fixed which, in some cases, showed a very inadequate retail profit, but the Committee were of the opinion that, after the first disturbance in business caused by their introduction, the majority of these Orders would prove a boon to the public and of much relief and assistance to the retailer in the present very exceptional circumstances.

26 October 1917

HM Factory Institute, Gretna. A public lecture, Food in Wartime, fully illustrated with LANTERN SLIDES, will be given by Professor D.Noel Paton MD, FRS, Lecturer at Glasgow University. Admission free, 7.30pm start.

27 October 1917

OUR SOLDIERS' FAVOURITE GRAMOPHONE. Music is the one thing that the boys at the Front call for day in and out. They can't get enough of it. That's why they demand so many of the Regal Compactophones. It is strong - portable - carries 10 and 12 inch records - they take it everywhere. Still they want more. Can't you send them one? THE REGAL COMPACTOPHONE. Price £ 7 10s, with inch turn-table and worm gear motor. B. Scott and Son. 18 Devonshire St, Carlisle.

28 October 1917

MUNITIONS EXPLOSION IN THE NORTH. The following statement was issues by the Press Bureau on Tuesday. On October 2nd it was announced that a serious fire and explosion had taken place at a munitions factory in the North of England, but that so far no deaths were known to have occurred. Subsequently it was announced that ten men, of whom four were firemen, have died, and two others were seriously injured. There were, however, no casualties amongst the women workers, nor have any injuries to women workers been reported. Thirty-seven munitions workers, many of them suffering from shock, and some temporarily homeless, came for shelter to Windermere. Lodgings were found and a subscription taken. The Minister of Munitions expressed in a letter his warm thanks for the readiness and generosity to which the Windermere people responded to so sudden a call upon their kindness and hospitality. The last three sufferers only took their leave this week.

29 October 1917

This week the wounded soldiers from the Grange VAD hospital were entertained by Mrs Borwick, of the Crown Hotel. After enjoying a good tea, they adjourned to the drawing room, where a musical programme was gone through, which the boys thoroughly enjoyed. MR WJ Bell took the humorous side and kept the boys in roars of laughter. As the soldiers left they were presented with a box of cigarettes each and cigars. A motor car was placed at their disposal for conveyance to the hospital.

30 October 1917

Ex-Workhouse Boy wins Military Medal. The Wigton Workhouse Master reported to the meeting of the Board today that two young men who when boys were inmates of the Workhouse, and who are now in the Army, had been over on leave and had visited them. One, Corporal Joseph Birney, had won the Military Medal. The Clerk to the Board was asked to write a congratulatory letter.

31 October 1917

Friday. The VC won by Lieutenant-Colonel B Best-Dunkley, who died of his wounds, has been presented to his widow. Mrs Best-Dunkley, at her father's residence, Risedale, Barrow, the cross being pinned onto the breast of their three month old son by Colonel Pedley, the Commandant of the Barrow Garrison. Mrs Best-Dunkley, was unable to travel to London to receive the posthumous honour.

01 November 1917

PALACE THEATRE, Carlisle, presents: 7pm and 9pm. HIGH EXPLOSIVES. In five explosions. By Robert Reilly and Herbert Sargent. The cast include Robert Reilly, Harry Maxam, Kitty Emson, Russell's Eight Fire Crackers, and a Shrapnel of Feminine Beauties. Guaranteed to Kill with Laughter and Hurt Nobody. This All-British Production has no bearing on the Army, Navy, or Politics. IT GOES WITH A BANG.

02 November 1917

PROHIBITION MEETING AT WIGTON. The Gretna Experiment. Wigton's meeting this week in connection with the National Educational Prohibition Campaign were largely attended, and was held in the Parish Rooms. The afternoon conference was presided over by Mr Ritson, who welcomed Professor Nicholls, of Boston, USA, who he said had come to help them to fight a greater enemy than the one they were fighting on the continent - an enemy which not only destroyed the body but was also capable of destroying the soul. Mr Hayler, London, said that more men and women had been killed through drink since the war began than were killed in the war (cries of "Shame').

03 November 1917

The Barrow News reported that a body of an unidentified seaman from the torpedoed HMS Champagne had been washed ashore at South End, Walney. The ship was sunk off the Isle of Man on the 9th of October.

04 November 1917

After the War Problems. Lord Leverhulme will, this week,  address a public meeting in the County Hall, Carlisle,  at 8pm, on the subject  CAPITAL AND LABOUR; THEIR MUTUAL OBLIGATIONS.

05 November 1917

Private E Tyson RFA, whose parents live at Ouse Bridge, Bassenthwaite, was severely wounded on November 5th. Whilst he was assisting in the construction of  huts a shell burst six yards from him and blew him 15 feet into the air. He has two shrapnel wounds in his back, and is severely bruised. His tunic was blown to ribbons. A few days before the head was shot off the pipe he was smoking, and only a few days before that his steel helmet saved him from a shrapnel wound in the head. He is now in hospital in Epsom. He was in business at Cockermouth where his wife and family are living. [Reported in the local press 11.12.1917].

06 November 1917

WILL any Lady with Motor Car DRIVE MUNITION WORKERS from YWCA Hostel to Works in Northern Munition Centre? Board-Lodging and Petrol provided. Need urgent - Apply, LADY SUPERINTENDENT, YWCA Dane Ghyll Hostel, Barrow in Furness.

07 November 1917

Before sending your Parcel  to the Front get some of our KHAKI SOCKS which have already proved to be such comfort  to Our Brave Boys. We are now showing these Socks in our windows. FITZSIMMONS, 77 Botchergate, and 17 Lowther Street, Carlisle. Ladies Shop 5 Lowther Street. Just received a Grand Range of MOTOR SCARVES.

08 November 1917

Capt. Claude Moore, late of the Lonsdale Battalion of the Border Regiment, has been accepted by the Bishop of Carlisle as a candidate for Holy Orders at the Christmas ordination, and Canon Byard, vicar of Penrith, has offered him a curacy at St Andrews Church which he has accepted. Capt. Moore was educated at Wigton Grammar School and Durham University, graduating in 1914. He hoped to be ordained that year, but when war broke out he joined the Army, and obtained a commission under Col. Machell in the Lonsdales. He was severely wounded on the first day of the Somme battle last year, and now has been invalided out of the service owing to his serious lameness.

09 November 1917

Lieutenant Edward Purseglove, Border Regiment, has been killed in action in France. The news was received by his father in Workington this evening. The following morning Lieutenant Purseglove was announced as having been promoted acting Captain. He went to Penrith a few years ago as a clerk at Messrs Glasson's Breweries and took an active part in amateur sport. He was secretary of the Football Club, and frequently filled a vacancy. He enlisted soon after the outbreak of the war, and served both in France and Gallipoli.

10 November 1917

There was again a great scarcity of butter in Carlisle market today. A large crowd of women and children paraded the congested alleys in vain, and many were forced to leave with empty baskets. A little excitement was occasioned  by some people in their eagerness to secure a share of the meagre quantities of butter for sale, but on the whole there was no serious demonstration, the dealers, we understand, having undertaken not to buy up large quantities. The scarcity undoubtedly was partly due to the fact that it was hiring day.

11 November 1917

PALACE THEATRE, CARLISLE. Help the Wounded. OUR DAY, Sunday November 11th at 8pm. Grand Charity Concert in aid of the Red Cross. When the following Artistes have kindly consented  to appear. The famous Band of HM 1st Battalion, The Border Regiment. By permission of the Officer Commanding (Colonel Mayhew). Will by special desire play the Grand Description Scene, BATTLE OF WATERLOO. With full and magnificent effects. Also a complete animated record of the training of the famous LONSDALE BATTALION (Cumberland Heroes) In 122 scenes showing camp life at Blackhall, from the formation of the Battalion until their departure from Carlisle. HELP THE WOUNDED.

12 November 1917

PLOUGHMEN. ANY FARMER wanting information as to the SUPPLY OF PLOUGHS, PLOUGHMEN, and HORSES, should apply to the Westmorland War Agricultural Committee at once, 15, Lowther Street, Kendal.

13 November 1917

QUEUE AT A WORKINGTON SHOP  Today at Workington the police were required to marshal the crowd of women who besieged the door of a shop in Pow Street, on its becoming known that a supply of margarine had arrived.

14 November 1917

Submarine HMS H24 launched at Barrow. Royal Navy [Scrapped 1934].

15 November 1917

Submarine HMS H26 launched at Barrow [Scrapped 1928].

16 November 1917

This week the Wigton Advertiser reported: Ex-Private Richard Sharp, of this town, has in the course of his career officiated as best man in three weddings. The bridegroom in the first of these weddings is in hospital wounded; the bride in the second wedding died within a fortnight, and the soldier who was bridegroom in the third marriage is wounded and missing. 'Dicky's services as best man will not be in such demand in future, if that's the sort of luck he brings!

Friday. At Penrith Martinmas hirings on Tuesday farmers reported that a new trouble had arisen with regard to their labour. Recently it was Gretna [Munitions Works] they complained about; now they state that men threaten to 'go to the woods' [forestry work] in the absence of satisfactory arrangements. While the War Agricultural Committee have ordered large areas of additional ploughing to be done the farmers are unable to get sufficient men. There were few men seeking situations, and these obtained £ 30 to £ 35 for the half-year, while youths obtained £ 25 to £ 30. Lads under military age practically had the market to themselves and secured £ 18 to £ 25. Women accustomed to dairying obtained £ 1 per week and board.

 

17 November 1917

Submarine HMS L2 launched launched at Barrow [Scrapped 1934].

18 November 1917

BURTON; an Organ recital was given in the parish church by Mr George Rathbone assisted by Miss Willow Wakefield (Vocalist) of Sedgwick today Sunday, November 18th at 2:45pm. The collection was in aid of St Dunstan's Hostel (Blinded Soldiers and Sailors) and Burton Men at the Front.

19 November 1917

Letter home, dated this day, from Captain Walter Ewbank, of Mealsgate.
"We went through undiluted hell during the latter part of our stay in Flanders. The fighting is very hard and bitter. It is a battle of mud and steel. Both sides have an overwhelming amount of artillery and munitions, and it is the infantry who have to bear the brunt, and of that the English (not Colonials, Irish etc) have taken the main part throughout. Every brutal device for killing has been used - gas, burning oil, flames, etc but the men have stuck it well and bravely."

20 November 1917

THE IDEAL PRESENT. A framed enlargement, in Black and White, Sepia or Water Colours, from PARKER'S PARISH CHURCH GATES, Kendal. Soldiers' Portraits a speciality. Send the small Photo today. Best quality obtainable.

21 November 1917

WESTMORLAND AGRICULTURAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. Seed Potatoes. Farmers and Small Growers requiring seed for 1918 should make their applications to the Committee before November 30th.

22 November 1917

Thirty casualties from the hospital ship Stad Antwerpen which had docked at Dover arrived in Penrith aboard a hospital train today. The casualties were forwarded to Penrith hospital.

23 November 1917

It was reported in the local press today that Private TH Bowron, Border Regiment, of Shap died on October 18th from a gas-shell (mustard) and wounds.

24 November 1917

Lady Valda Machel has been able to send 2346 articles in all to the Lonsdale Battalion since April of the year, when she appealed for contributions during the Summer. The articles consisted of 2236 pairs of socks (including 1000 pairs from Queen Mary's Needlework Guild, St James Palace), 40 pairs of mittens, 18 pairs of gloves, 30 caps and fur helmets. Lady Valda asks the friends of the Battalion to continue their kind gifts during the coming winter, which has begun so early and promises to be exceptionally severe.

25 November 1917

George Carruthers (Discharged Soldier) PAINTER, PAPERHANGER, PLASTERER. Begs to inform the inhabitants of Carlisle and District that he has commenced Business on his own account and hopes by strict attention to gain a share of the Public Patronage. Jobbing work of all kinds promptly attended to. Note the address; 31 Ruthella Street, Newtown, Carlisle.

26 November 1917

Sir - When the Control Board first took over the public houses in Carlisle I happened to be in Manchester and I remember a temperance advocate saying he was watching the scheme with great interest, as his friends and him were hoping it would be the means of turning the beerhouses into temperance institutions. I wonder if there are any members of the Control Board with the same views as my Manchester friend. It certainly would be better if they said so, for their arguments in favour of Sunday closing carry no weight. If the persons who use beer shortage as an argument against Sunday opening witnessed the amount of beer that is carried home in bottles on a Saturday nothing more would be said about shortage. Then if it is a fact that some members of the Control Board are there for the sole object of pushing forward Prohibition, it is time the trade unionists did something to let these people see that the men of Carlisle are too far advanced to allow any committees experimenting on them without their consideration. J Foster 20 Westmorland Street, Carlisle. [letter to Carlisle Journal].

27 November 1917

MILITARY Tunics, Slacks and breeches. BRITISH WARMS, cardigans, leather vests. TRENCH COATS. High-Class military tailors and complete outfitters. Economy, promptitude and exactitude at Wilson Jespers and Co (Only Address) CARLISLE.

28 November 1917

UNDERBARROW INSTITUTE. A whist drive and dance will be held in aid of the LADS from the Parishes of Underbarrow and Bradleyfield, November 28th, 1917 at 8pm.

29 November 1917

'After many years' Private Henry Fell, (Border Regiment), Wigton, has at last been wounded. 'I am a lucky boy to be alive,' he writes home. 'A bullet went through my ear and grazed my poor old head, so you see it might have been worse. I am in bed at present but hope to be up soon. Sorry it is not a Blighty; no luck again, but I will just have to hope for the best. We gave the Germans some stick, and drove them about five miles back in one day'.

30 November 1917

Captain Walter Ewbank was killed this day, shot through the heart in Flanders leading his men against a German counter attack. After his death his parents, The Rev Ewbank and Mrs Ewbank, Bolton Rectory Mealsgate,  received a letter from Walter:
"My dear Father and Mother. I am going into it now, and this is just a line in case I don't come out. Don't worry about me. I shall be happy, and am ready if I am called to join dear old Larx [his brother Leonard, killed in action on 23.02.1916.] We will wait for you up there and watch over you."

01 December 1917

GREAT CENTRAL HOSTEL, Viaduct, Carlisle. A sale of work and entertainment by Munition Girls and Staff will be given at the above Hostel  on Saturday, December 1st, at 6pm. proceeds to be devoted to the Fund for Disabled Soldiers and Sailors. To be opened by Lady Gillford. Admission sixpence.

02 December 1917

Grand Bazaar and Fancy Fair. In view of the approaching Gift Season we have gathered together a wonderful variety of novelties and useful fancy goods, including strong British made Toys and Games for the Children. All at very low prices. The majority of the Toys have been made in Lord Roberts' Workshops for Disabled Soldiers. Kendal Co-operative Society, 5a Highgate, Kendal.

03 December 1917

At a recent sitting of the North Lonsdale Appeals, Ulverston, Mr PJ Hibbert Chairman; Mr WC Kendall was granted a re-hearing in respect of George A Lindow (26 married), working at Vickers, and formerly of Lowick, who appealed on the grounds of the illness of his wife. It was stated that Lindow had six brothers and half-brothers in the Army, two of whom had been killed, and another was missing. Adjourned to next sitting for the production of a medical certificate.

04 December 1917

The Carlisle City Chief Constable. Today's London Gazette contains an official notice that the Chief Constable of Carlisle has formally assumed by deed poll the name of Eric Herbert Spencer, in place of Eric Herbert de Schmid. Spence was the name of his grandmother on the paternal side.

05 December 1917

The Munitions Tribunal for Carlisle and District was held at the Town Hall this week. James Lennox, a moulder, pleaded guilty to a charge of having lost 49 hours between August 31st and October 18th, and said it was due to bad health, and the death of his wife, which left him with four delicate children to look after. The defendant was fined £ 1.

06 December 1917

Twenty-three casualties from the hospital ship Pieger de Corinck which had docked at Dover arrived in Kendal aboard a hospital train today. The casualties were forwarded to the Stramongate Hospital, Kendal.

07 December 1917

OLDER CARLISLE AND AROUND ABOUT. Under this title, Miss Mary Slee, the well-known local artist, has published a second volume of sketches. The little booklet, the inscription states, is gratefully dedicated to 'our suffering comrades', and the profits of the sale will be presented to the Local Auxiliary Hospitals. Not only the patriotic and generous object, to which Miss Slee has devoted her art, but the intrinsic merit and interest of her work will make, we are confident, an irresistible appeal to all lovers of Carlisle and its historic associations. It is priced 2/6.

08 December 1917

WOUNDED SOLDIERS' WORK GUILD, CARLISLE. The third sale of needlework and handicrafts will be opened by Lady Mabel Howard at the King's Hall, Globe Lane, Carlisle, on Saturday, December 8th at 2pm and will remain open until 4:45 pm. The Chair will be taken by Dr Barnes. Admission 6d.

09 December 1917

A GRAND CONCERT in aid of the Prisoners of War Fund, under the auspices of the CARLISLE CITIZENS' LEAGUE will be held on Sunday, December 9th at 8pm in Her Majesty's Theatre, Carlisle. Mr Ernest Stevens has kindly lent the Theatre.

10 December 1917

It was reported in the local newspapers this week that AB George Barnes RND, whose parents live at Belle Isle Place, Workington, was wounded on October 26th, and lay undiscovered for three days. Both his legs have been amputated.

11 December 1917

It was reported in the local press today that Private Foster Crickett, whose mother lives in Lonsdale Street, Workington, has been wounded for the fifth time. He has also the experience of being buried by a shell.

12 December 1917

News has been received in Barrow of the death of Walter Poole (22), son of Mr and Mrs Poole, Lord Street, who was killed in a naval action in the North Sea on December 12th. The deceased was home on leave about a month before his last engagement. He was as able seaman attached to one of HMS destroyers, which was sunk while escorting a convoy. Deceased was a fine type of the sturdy British sailor. He joined the Navy about twelve months prior to the war, before which he had worked Barrow Shipyard. He was in every respect a fine promising lad, and the news of his death must be a heavy blow to his parents and friends [Barrow News 02.02.1918]

13 December 1917

At Kendal today, James Park, farmer, Skelsmergh, was summoned by Mrs Briggs, wife of John James Briggs, Wattsfield, with assaulting her in Kendal market Saturday. Harry Hayton, farmer, Lambrigg, said he and his wife were carrying a butter box, and complainant came up and wanted butter. He said 'It's for my customers'. Mrs Briggs thereupon called out. 'Come along, let's have the butter,' and a crowd of women pressing forward caused his wife to fall on her knees, and a number of eggs she was carrying were smashed. Defendant, in trying to keep the crowd off, unintentionally hit Mrs Briggs. An umbrella, which was broken in the fracas, was afterwards claimed by Mrs Briggs. The Bench dismissed the case.

14 December 1917

Archdeacon Lafone, writing in Barrow St George's Parish Magazine to thank those who had sent resolutions of sympathy to him on the loss of his only brother, who was killed in Palestine on October 27th says: 'From news just received it appears he died a glorious death, and one such as he would have chosen, fighting against heavy odds. One of his regiment writes that my brother and forty men held a position in front of Beersheba and kept at bay 600 Turks until the infantry could come up; that the last message they had from him was 'I intend to hold out till the last.' When the relief arrived all the survivors were wounded, but they picked up the bodies of 208 Turks, so that the stand made by this small band of yeomanry was not in vain.'

15 December 1917

A meeting of the Council of the Cumberland Football Association was held this afternoon at the Commercial Hotel, Workington to consider the question as to having a Cup Competition as sanctioned by the Football Association. Mr WJ Dodgson presided. The Chairman said they all knew operations  has been suspended for a considerable time now owing to the War. He thought probably that had they not suspended they could not have carried on, as footballers were engaged in a game more strenuous than that played on a football pitch. The Secretary and him had computed that something like 2,000 footballers had left the county for the War. Unfortunately many of them had been killed. It was unanimously agreed that no competition be run.

16 December 1917

This afternoon a memorial service was held at Great Strickland Church, the sad occasion being the recent death of Lance-Corporal Shaw, of the Post Office, Great Strickland. In spite of stormy weather there was a good attendance of sympathising friends, in addition to the relatives, at the service; and very touching reference was made by the Rev G Jones, Vicar, in his sermon, to the brave young soldier who had passed away.

17 December 1917

CITY OF CARLISLE. Potatoes in Bread. At the request of the Food Controller the Carlisle Local Food Committee direct attention to the necessity of extending the practice of using POTATOES in BREAD, and all Bakers in the City are urged to apply to the Food Office for the necessary forms without delay. As some prejudice seems to exist amongst householders who bake their own Bread, the Food Controller publishes the following instructions which make good, lighter, and more palatable Bread than that made with War Flour. 1lb of Unpeeled potatoes, 7lb of Flour. Peel the potatoes thinly, boil them, and pass through a sieve or mash very finely. Mix gradually with the Flour, and then proceed as with 8lb of Flour.

18 December 1917

CANADIAN ELECTION AT PENRITH. The 200 men of the Canadian Overseas Forces engaged in cutting down the timber on the Penrith Beacon  have just exercised the franchise in connection with the Canadian election. The polling booth was a large tent on Penrith golf course, the outside of which bore the usual election posters. One of these read 'Every vote against the Government is a vote given to the Hun'.

19 December 1917

A concert was given by Lady Rochdale and wounded officers at the Lingholm Military Hospital in the Queen of the Lakes Pavilion this evening. There was a full house, and an excellent programme was rendered. One item was a quartet, which, to the tune of 'John Peel', had been arranged by the officers, and contained all kinds of amusing localisms, causing much laughter. The amount realised, which was for the benefit of the county hospital and two war working parties, was £ 38.

20 December 1917

SAINTS The place for choice and Value, Stramongate, Kendal. The presents that are practical and useful all the year round. We cordially invite you to visit our showrooms. Soldiers' Bullet Proof Mirror. Nickel-plated in case, 1s 3d. Tommy's Cooker, the Soldiers' Pocket Stove, 1s each.

21 December 1917

At the annual gathering of the Bolton Flower Show the committee passed a vote of condolence with the president, The Rev J Ewbank, on the loss of his son in France.

22 December 1917

Married today at Saint Cuthbert's Church, Carlisle; Dan Haverlock, aged 22, Batchelor, soldier, to Elizabeth Hannah Harland, aged 21, Spinster, munition worker.

23 December 1917

This winter the Hethersgill Ladies' Committee for providing soldiers' comforts have been able to send a large quantity of woollen garments to 26 local men serving in France, Egypt and India. Each parcel contained shirts, socks, mufflers, or mittens. In addition, they have sent a large consignment of similar garments to Lady Lonsdale's Central Committee, per Lady Allison.

24 December 1917

West Ward Board of Guardians. Mr J C Dent presided at a meeting of this board at Penrith today. The Clerk read a letter from the Local Government Board stating the conditions under which men who had become mentally deranged through military service would be accepted as service patients in the asylums. Mr Noble said it was a great disgrace in the country that men who had become mentally deranged in the service of their country should be sent to asylums at all. From what he had seen of the asylums as a visitor he thought it would be more likely to make them worse rather than better. Mr Cleasby said it was a great shame that men suffering from shell-shock etc should be put amongst practical idiots.

25 December 1917

A very happy Christmas has been spent by all at the Englethwaite Auxiliary Hospital. Christmas day was brilliantly fine and sunny. Many of the patients attended the Parish Church at Cotehill in the morning. Through the kindness of friends turkeys and apple puddings were the Christmas fare, with a desert of apples, grapes, nuts, and dates. After tea an entertainment by Mrs Murray and Miss Murray was given, commencing with carols and recitations, and songs accompanied with the violin, and later came games. The large company of patients and staff greatly appreciated the different items, Nurse Smith and Privates Faulkener and Smith also taking part.

26 December 1917

BRINDLE UNITED, WIGTON V DISCHARGED WIGTON SOLDIERS. This match which took place in the Brindle Field, Wigton, today, aroused much interest. A well contested game was won by Brindle United by three goals to one.

27 December 1917

HUDSON SCOTT AND SONS LTD, Carlisle, are engaged on work of NATIONAL IMPORTANCE. Will you help? Good wages guaranteed to Girls.

28 December 1917

AIR RAID WARNINGS. Whitehaven Fire Brigade, Stables, and Streets Committee resolved that the Surveyor have printed and distributed from house to house a leaflet describing the alterations in the warning to be given on the Fire Syren.

29 December 1917

HAIRDRESSING. Wanted Male or Female to manage business; owner called up. Address, Box 52, 'News' Office, Barrow.

30 December 1917

Wanted for the Military Hospital at Roose Institution  an experienced nurse to take charge of  military wards, day and night duty alternatively, under direction of the Superintendent Nurse of the Infirmary. Knowledge of  massage required. Salary at the rate of £ 40 per year, with such allowances as are sanctioned by the War Office. Applications, stating age and with copies of recent testimonials to be forwarded to reach the undersigned no later than 15th January 1918. FW Taylor, Clerk to the Guardians, Barrow in Furness.

31 December 1917

BARROW COMFORTS ASSOCIATION - There has been forwarded during the month of December for the use of the troops to the Lancashire County War Comforts Association, the following articles: - 61 shirts, 120 pairs of socks, 54 mufflers, 21 handkerchiefs, 6 helmets, 1 vest, 47 pairs of mittens, 6 pairs  of gloves, 1 pair of cuffs, 1 chest  protector. The total number of items now forwarded amounts to 11,844. There has also been received towards the provision of comforts the sum of £ 2 from the Holker-street Infants School.

01 January 1918

BURTON IN LONSDALE. The usual watch night service was held at All Saints Church on New Year's Eve, conducted by the Vicar. Owing to war regulations the ringing in of the New Year on the church bells was dispensed with.  Holy Communion followed the service. A parochial gathering  took place in the church Sunday school on New Year's Eve, and to meet the difficulty of obtaining food for a tea, a potato-pie supper was held, to which 140 sat down.  After supper the Vicar gave a lantern lecture. He mentioned a special cause for thankfulness that not a single Burton soldier or sailor had been killed during the war.

02 January 1918

Carlisle. The Palace Theatre presents THE DAY: Germany's Boast and John Bull's Reply, by Harold Feber. Twice nightly 7pm and 9pm. Monday December 31st and during the week. 

03 January 1918

The inauguration of Alston Soldiers' and Sailors' Welcome Home Association took place in the Masonic Hall. Mr JR Walton, the Chairman, said the object was to provide entertainment and presents for the sailors and soldiers when on leave, and to raise a fund for the final welcome home of the brave men of their parish. The Rev SHW Lovett (Vicar), Mr Lee, and others addressed the gathering. Sergeant J Hetherington, who had been awarded a Military Medal, was present and received a hearty welcome. The Chairman, on behalf of the committee, made him a monetary present, and stated they hoped to have the medal sent on for presentation at Alston.

04 January 1918

NATIONAL WAR BONDS AND 'DURAFIT' OVERCOATS. The Best Investments for a Rainy Day. S Redmayne and Sons, 44 English Street, 93 Botchergate, Carlisle.

05 January 1918

An authentic document addressed from a remote village about a dozen miles from Kendal as the crow flies, to the executive officer of the Food Control Committee for the district, has come into my hands as an epistolary curiosity. The writer had been asked to explain some irregularities in his application for a sugar card. His reply, dated last Friday, is so full of indecorous epithets that only in the columns of a profane print not intended for family reading could they be given in full. Here they are indicated by blanks:- 'If I am not registered what the ___ was I put in class 18 for and called up not less than 14 times to be a _____soldier? To____with the___Registration! If you cannot issue a sugar ticket, issue a___substitute; we get little else under the present Government. You can do what the ___you like. I shall get sugar even if I go to jail for it".

06 January 1918

At Kirkby Stephen Church today, Sunday, people were praying continuously from 8am to 8pm. The building was well filled morning and evening, and the collections, which were for the Red Cross fund, amounted  for £ 13, or £ 5 more than last year. The united morning service was attended by the Volunteers. The vicar preached a special war sermon on each occasion, and he called attention to the fact that the first British relief in the South African War, namely the relief of Kimberley, came after a great day of intercession. A special service was held in the Wesleyan Chapel on Sunday evening. The Rev E Ogden occupied the pulpit. The church roll of honour, containing between 70 and 80 names, was read.

07 January 1918

GAIETY and PICTUREDROME, Abbey Road, Barrow. Week commencing  Monday, January 7th. THE CRISIS. By Winston Churchill, the American Author. This is a marvellous production, considered one of the greatest ever filmed. The battle scenes are simply marvellous.

08 January 1918

PENRITH RACECOURSE TO BE PLOUGHED. A conference between members of the Penrith Urban Council and a deputation from the Golf Club was held  this week. The Cumberland War Agricultural Committee have ordered the Council to plough 35 acres of the Racecourse - roughly one-half of the enclosure which forms the larger part of the Golf Club's course, the other portion, on the Beacon Hill, having already been taken by the military. The ploughing is proposed to be done on the north side, between the Grand Stand and Greengill, and the two parties are endeavouring to come to terms as to the loss, the Golf Club holding a lease from the Council, who in turn are lessees under the company which formed the Racecourse over a century ago.

Tuesday Private WJ Crone has visited his relatives in Wigton on recovering from trench fever and gas. At the time of being gassed he was buried for eight hours, and was unconscious when dug out. He is well known in Allonby, his mother at one time being tenant of the Grapes Hotel. He was engineer at Carrs Flour Mills, Silloth, for some years before emigrating to Canada.

09 January 1918

Private JM Johnston, a former Workington Marsh Mission footballer, who returned from Argentina (whither he emigrated nine years ago) to enlist in the Border Regiment, is reported to have been killed on November 2nd. His parents who formerly lived in Hartington Street, Workington, went to Vancouver few years ago.

10 January 1918

Victoria Palace, Ulverston. This evening - one of the Finest and Most Thrilling Dramas of the Season. A MUNITION GIRL'S ROMANCE. Broadwest Production, featuring VIOLET HOPSON. Prices (including Tax) 1/3, 1/-, 8d, 5d, 2d.

11 January 1918

From today's Carlisle Journal: The January sales are in full swing, the excuse for this untimely display of fashions being that it represents the keeping up of a custom rather than the half-yearly clearance of surplus stock. Be that as it may be, the shops are crowded with eager bargain hunters, and the columns of many of the dailies  are filled with illustrations and elaborate descriptions of costly apparel. In some of the more exclusive establishments in the West End, there are evening frocks, gorgeous wraps, and coats, the original cost of which, as stated, was over forty guineas, and the reduced price is thirteen and a half guineas. The exorbitant price originally asked reveals a system of profiteering of an unscrupulous kind, but the buyers are voluntary victims of such extortion. No wonder it is suggested that a tax should be levied on such lavish and unnecessary expenditure on fine clothes.

12 January 1918

This evening a presentation was made to Private Joshua Davidson, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, who had won the Military Medal in October, took place in the Market Hall at Aspatria, Mr ME Sanderson presiding. The Colliery Band was in attendance and played selections. The presentation consisted of £ 50 as follows:- A gold watch and guard suitably inscribed and the balance in Treasury notes, from the Cumberland Conciliation Board. Lieut GH Askew, 2/1st Aspatria Company CVR, made the presentation. Private Davidson making a suitable reply. He was awarded the Medal for carrying despatches under heavy barrage fire.

13 January 1918

From this week's Westmorland Gazette. it was stated in a London paper: the crusade against food-hoarding has led to a new pastime amongst the inquisitive. They watch the arrival of food parcels at local railway stations and note their destinations. Deliveries to large houses in particular are watched. This is not vain fancy. Even in Kendal one hears of inquisitors of this kind. One hears also the name of persons or houses upon which a more or less envious watch is directed. Sometimes the informant goes so far as to reveal the number and quantity of courses comprised in the menu at a family dinner party. The vigilant suspicion indicated by these examples is no doubt limited; but it exists and ought to be added to the considerations which tend to discourage food hoarding.

14 January 1918

Crossland, Pte Richard, King's Own Royal Lancaster Regt., son of Corp H.Crossland, who was reported missing after the Cambria operations, is a prisoner of war in Germany, his wife receiving a communication from him to that effect today. He had been 12 months in France, where four other brothers are serving, and one in India. The father was released and came home on reserve when the youngest son, Ernest, had to go. Pte E Crossland was gymnasium instructor at the YMCA. He has two children.

15 January 1918

Today the Chancellor of the Diocese of Carlisle granted a faculty to Windermere St Mary's for a War Memorial Chapel.

16 January 1918

Private G Harrison, Cockermouth, King's Own Royal Lancaster, is reported missing. His brother has also been missing for five months.

17 January 1918

By the Wounded  - For the Wounded. Town Hall, Barrow. Tuesday, January 17th, 1918, at 2:30 and &:50 pm Special Return Visit. Two Unique Variety Concerts by the wounded soldiers from Blackpool. Entirely new programme. Prices of admission; - Stalls, 3s, Second seats and balcony 2s; Body of hall, 1s. Tickets can be obtained and seats booked at Messrs Walch and Pohl's, Duke Street. Proceeds in aid of the King's Lancashire Military Convalescent Hospital, Lancashire.

18 January 1918

Mr and Mrs Dodd, Union Street, Wigton, who have lost three sons at the War, have received this letter from Captain S. Rigg. 'I am writing to ask you to accept my very sincere sympathy in the death of your son Albert. I have told you before what a very high opinion I had of Albert; he and 'Wally' were two of the bravest lads I have met out here. Whether on patrol or doing ordinary trench duty he had only one thought, and that was his duty. His first thought of being wounded was of his comrades who were wounded alongside him. and as to whether the relief which was in progress at the time had been successfully accomplished. The news of his death came as a blow to us all, especially his Wigton comrades and I can assure you that you have the sympathy of all of us. You, Mr Dodd, have made an enormous sacrifice for your country in this War, and I can only pray that God will help you to bear this fresh load of sorrow which has been thrust upon your wife and yourself'.

19 January 1918

This week's Economical Wartime Recipe in the Barrow News was for Potato Gingerbread Pudding.

20 January 1918

BARROW PUBLIC LIBRARY. Applications are invited for the post of TEMPORARY LIBRARIAN to fill the vacancy caused by the LIBRARIAN'S absence on Military Service. Male candidates must be ineligible for or discharged from the Army. A thorough knowledge of classification and cataloguing is essential. Salary at the rate of £ 130 per annum. L Hewlett, Town Clerk, Town Hall, Barrow in Furness.

21 January 1918

Only the best overalls are good enough for the men who build the guns. The best overalls are sold only by MCDOWELLS', Cavendish Street, Barrow.

22 January 1918

Baptised this month at the Parish Church, Maryport, Douglas Haig son of Francis and Mary Harden, Brow Street, Maryport.

23 January 1918

ULVERSTON BRANCH of the Women's Unionist Association. Non-stop whist drive, Conservative Club, Wednesday, January 23rd., at 7:45 pm, for Prisoners of War Fund.

24 January 1918

Carlisle Rural Tribunal met his week. In the National Service appeal against the exemption of William Murray, 31, married, a gardener and farm hand at Dalston Hall.  Mr Stead said he hoped the Tribunal  would not think that the man was employed watering geraniums. He was absolutely employed on food production. He had a garden of one and a half acres and a farm of 38 acres at which there was one hand. Two gardeners had joined the Army, the chauffeur was with the ambulance at the front and another had gone on the railway. This man certainly produced a great deal of food and when nobody else had a potato last year, after they had sold a great many potatoes, they distributed 200 stones among the Dalston people. Although he was passed Grade 1 he was very delicate. The appeal was disallowed.

25 January 1918

CARLISLE RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL. Take Notice. Owing to the haulage of Timber by Motor Transport Waggons from the Canadians Camp at Thurstonfield to Dalston Station, the following Roads have been broken up to a very serious extent so as to constitute a great danger to the General Public using the Roads especially as to users of these roads at Night Time, who may be driving or travelling by Motor Car or Cycle. As these extraordinary conditions are caused in carrying out Government work, under present weather conditions cannot be substantially repaired. The Public are therefore warned, when using the undermentioned sections of road, to exercise every care and avoid travelling by night time as much as possible. Road from Thurstonfield near Aikrigg Cottage through Great Orton village, and thence by Grange Farm and Cardewlees Road to Dalston Station. From Wigton main road at a point turning to Newby West, and then through Little Orton village, via Bow and Moorhouse Road, to Thurstonfield. The Road between Bow Farm and past Stone Rigg Farm, and leading towards Great Orton Road. JW Kirsopp, Highway Surveyor, 7 Victoria Place, Carlisle.

26 January 1918

The following letter appears in today's 'Daily Dispatch'. 'Being an employee at Vickers , Barrow, for some years, I am pleased to see someone has had the courage to speak out.  A visit to these works by the military authorities would clear a few of the shirkers out of it into the army. This particular class of gentry are frank about it, and say they don't intend to join the army. Amongst them are grocers, barbers, tailors, actors, weavers, undertakers, all of military age, and have come here, as they tell you, for the duration of the war. Now is the time to make them aware of their liabilities - Fairplay'.

27 January 1918

PATTERDALE WAR SHRINE. Mrs Marshall, Patterdale Hall, Ullswater, has erected a war shrine under the arch of St Patrick's Well, an ancient enclosed wall by the side of the highway at Patterdale. The shrine is made of teak wood and copper taken from the old cadet training ship Britannia. It was designed by a firm of ecclesiastical architects. It contains the names of 82 'old boys' of Patterdale School, who are serving together with their rank and regiment. The names have been painted on the shrine by Mrs Marshall herself.

28 January 1918

BARROW MUNITIONS LEAGUE RESULTS
Millom 4 Shipbuilders 0
Dalton 4 3rd South Lancashires 2
Royal Naval Air Service 4 Airship Athletic 2
Barrow 2 Swarthmoor 1

29 January 1918

Submarine HMS H23 launched at Barrow. [Scrapped 1934].

30 January 1918

Holmrook Officers Hospital opens.

The war drags on just the same and they again wanting about half a million more men. John Hall, farmer of Rosley notes in his diary this day.

 

31 January 1918

The Bishop of Carlisle has asked the clergy in his diocese to hold themselves in readiness to go out to France and Flanders as chaplains.

01 February 1918

At Crosthwaite [Westmorland] in view of the urgent appeal to plough more land, an unused portion of the burial ground adjoining the Parish Church has been ploughed.

02 February 1918

The Wigton Advertiser reported today: There is yet no word about Private John Fleming Curran Pattinson [Border Regiment] a Wigtonian who has been missing since July 10th last. The youngest son of Mr William Pattinson, South End, Wigton, he has been on active service with the Border Regiment since the outbreak of the war, having been in the Militia, and in the course of hard fighting [including Neuve Chapelle, the Somme, Ypres, and the advance of July 1916], was wounded on four different occasions. Once he had the experience of reading a notice of his own death in a newspaper. Private Pattinson was twenty-four years of age, and was in farm service before the war, being hired with Mr Beeby Williamson at Churchrigg.  'Jack' was a fine lad - steady and quiet in civilian life, but a 'devil to fight' when in combat with the Huns.

03 February 1918

A WHITEHAVEN PROTEST. At a largely attended meeting of the members of Whitehaven Miners Joint Lodges on today, Mr J Hanlon presiding, it was decided to call upon the employers of four Belgians taken into Ladysmith Pit to send them away again. A resolution was also passed demanding that men who had entered the mines and other munition works since the commencement of the war should be cleared out before any of the other workmen were called up and that in the event of a ballot being taken throughout the Miners' Federation Area, it should be only taken amongst the men eligible for the Army.

04 February 1918

Today 255 boys from Bishop Goodwin School, Carlisle, attended the Stanley Hall to see film: 'With the Empire Fighters'.

05 February 1918

KENDAL HORTICULTURAL STORES. High Class Florists, Nurserymen, Seedsmen and Fruiterers, Kent Street, Kendal. ENGLAND EXPECTS EVERY PLOT TO GROW ITS UTMOST. By producing vegetables to augment the Nation's Food Supply YOU ARE HELPING TO WIN THE WAR. Put every ounce of energy in your Vegetable Plot this year  and break all previous records for big crops. FERGUS LAMB, Seed Expert, who will esteem your orders.

06 February 1918

The British steamer Westmoreland was torpedoed by UB-57 of the north coast of the Isle of Man before being wrecked off Drigg. She was carrying frozen meat for the troops in France.

07 February 1918

Steamship Limesfield torpedoed and sunk, without loss of life, 23 miles west-north-west of Walney.

The Whitehaven News reported today that a woman had been trampled, and badly hurt, in a butcher's queue in Cleator Moor. [A national meat rationing scheme was introduced on 25th March 1918.]

08 February 1918

FATAL RESULT OF SHIPYARD INJURIES.  An accident occurred at the Vickers yard, Barrow,  today when Mabel Dixon, machinist, aged 23, caught her sleeve in some machinery, and her arm was so badly injured that it had to be subsequently amputated. [Miss Dixon, of St Vincent's Street succumbed to her injuries in the North Lonsdale Hospital on February 15th]

09 February 1918

MUNITION WORKERS and others concerned in the Production and Distribution of MUNITIONS who have been forced to leave, or threatened with removal from houses tenanted by these because of change of owner, or other causes are requested to send details in writing to the undersigned. Information in writing is also desired regarding cases where such workers have been compelled to occupy unsanitary dwellings, such as shops, as a result of the houses shortage in the City. All communications will be treated as strictly confidential. Thos. F Thompson, Hon Sec, Carlisle Trades and Labour Council, 41 Ruthella Street, Carlisle.

10 February 1918

MISSING. 2nd BORDER REGIMENT - Arthur William Johnson, Lance-Corporal. No 33382, C Company, XI Platoon. MISSING since October 26th, 1917. Any information gladly received by Father WM Johnson, Knowsley, Prescot.

11 February 1918

Today the merchant ship on which Second-Officer Clement Taylor served was torpedoed and he drowned. His funeral will take place on Saturday 16th at Arthuret Churchyard. His wife lives with Miss Lowther, West Street, Wigton.  Deceased was the only son of Mr Edgar Taylor, of Longtown. Second-Officer Taylor was serving on a vessel which was torpedoed last July.

12 February 1918

SALE OF GULLS' EGGS. With a view to augmenting the food supplies Sir John Ramadan, owner of the Ravenglass gullery, last year authorised the sale of eggs of the common gulls. The proceeds of the sales, amounting to £ 40 10s, have been paid by Mr Watt, steward of the estate, to the Cumberland Branch of the British Red Cross Society.

13 February 1918

PACIFIST MEETING - Mr George Lansbury addressed a socialist and pacifist meeting, under the auspices of the Independent Labour Party, at the Old Town Hall, Barrow, this evening. Mr T Morton presided, and amongst those on the platform  were Councs.  Ellison, Basterfield, Rev S Liberty, of Walney, and a few shop stewards.

14 February 1918

LOST on Saturday [9th], Lonsdale [Battalion] Badge, property of widow, between Caldewgate and Botchergate, Carlisle. Reward, 'Cumberland News Office.

15 February 1918

'Pow Wow'. Under this pithy title the Rev AJW Crosse, who resigned the living of Saint Cuthbert's, Carlisle, in order to become Chaplain to the Lonsdale Battalion of the Border Regiment, has published a little volume of the addresses he has given to the officers and men of the Division to which he is attached at church parades and voluntary services during the past two years. They have been delivered in all sorts of places and only once in a church. Copies are on sale at Messrs Thurnam's, English Street, at sixpence each and the proceeds will go towards purchasing comforts for the men of the Division.

16 February 1918

How times have changed in the comparatively short time of three and a half years, but oh, what a terrible three and a half years. War ravages change the mode of living - aye, and thinking too - as nothing else can. We find in place of tradesmen touting for custom long lines of queues waiting to be served with the barest necessities to keep life together. Has the sight of a long queue of patient women never struck you to the quick, has it never sent a thrill of pity through your heart-strings? Oh the pathos of it all! Barrow News 16.02.1918 By a special correspondent.

17 February 1918

THE MILLOM SCHOOLS which owing to lighting difficulties had to alter the times of commencing and closing to 8 - 45 and 3 - 15 will revert to the old arrangements next week, viz 9 o'clock for the opening and 4 o'clock for closing. In another month, however, summer time will come into operation when another change will have to be made.

18 February 1918

Carlisle Chamber of Commerce. AFTER-WAR PROBLEMS. Sir Henry  Jones will ADDRESS a PUBLIC MEETING in the COUNTY HALL, Carlisle, on Monday, FEBRUARY 18th at 8pm on THE FORGOTTEN FACTOR IN RECONSTRUCTION. The Bishop of Carlisle will preside. Doors open 7:30. Admission Free. Discussion.

19 February 1918

An entertainment recently given by the scholars of Brathay School, before a crowded audience, which consisted of drill, action songs, Highland dance, recitations, etc., realised over £ 3, which with donations will be used  for wool for children knitting soldiers' comforts.

20 February 1918

By a concert given this evening in the schoolroom at Kendal Inghamite Chapel, to provide comforts for those belonging to the Chapel who are now serving in His Majesty's Forces, the sum of £ 3 was realised.

21 February 1918

WORKERS EDUCATIONAL ASSOCIATION. A public lecture will be given by the DEAN of Carlisle (Dr Rashdall) in the Town Hall, Carlisle, Thursday, February 21st at 8pm. Subject 'HOW GERMANY IS GOVERNED'. Questions and Discussion.

22 February 1918

The County Appeal Tribunal was held in Penrith today, Canon Sutton presiding. KESWICK BOBBINS. Major Brown appealed against ten men engaged in bobbin manufacturer at Keswick. Mr Arnison, for the respondents and their employers, Messrs Coward Philipson and Company, said the firm was engaged entirely on work of national importance and were making bobbins for more than half of the flax mills in Ireland. They also were making special articles for use in the trenches - Major Brown said he was willing to admit that the work was of national importance, but it was not protected. The appeals were dismissed .

23 February 1918

SOUTH WESTMORLAND RURAL TRIBUNAL. A sitting of the Tribunal took place in Kendal Town Hall today. Mr JK Robinson presiding - the exemption of a Barbon farm servant of 18 had been challenged. He had previously been given to 1st May. He began on agricultural work on 2nd June last year, and his conduct in his present place had not been satisfactory. Challenge upheld.

24 February 1918

LANCASHIRE WAR AGRICULTURAL COMMITTEE. ULVERSTON DISTRICT EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. DESTRUCTION OF ROOKS.  Attention has been directed to the destructiveness of Rooks, where they exist in large numbers, and the urgent necessity of conserving home-grown supplies of food. Owners of Rookeries are requested to shot their Rooks and reduce their Rookeries to the lowest possible limits.

25 February 1918

From his week's Barrow News:
PEACE WITH HONOUR
Oh, that forbidden talk might be
Of Peace till won by Victory!
The nation's voice some arrogate,
Forgetting as their views they state
Our Promise not to sheathe the sword
Until wronged Belgium be restored;
And help our Ally to regain
From German thieves, Alsace-Lorraine.
E.I.F.H

26 February 1918

Submarine HMS L11 launched at Barrow. [Scrapped 1932].

27 February 1918

Kirkby Lonsdale. This evening a lecture, illustrated by lantern slides, was given by Miss Vera Holme (motor transport driver to the Scottish Women's Hospital) on her experience in Serbia two years ago. The invasion of the country, and the consequent removal of the inmates of the hospital down the country, with the many difficulties which had to be overcome, were detailed. Later, when the enemy still coming on, the hospital staff had to decide what should be done, and Miss Holme was one of the party  of fourteen which decided to stay with the wounded. The hospital party were taken prisoner with the unit, and were in the hands of the Germans for three weeks and afterwards under the Austrians. Miss Holme gave some sidelights on the friction which undoubtedly existed between the German and Austrian officers and men during this time, but the Austrian forces treated their unit with greater courtesy than did their ally. Miss Holme said the party were later ordered home, and came via Vienna, where she said the difficulties of obtaining meat and bread were acute then. The pitiful plight of the Serbian Army in its retreat across the Albanian mountains was described. Miss Holme spoke in a direct manner of her many experiences, and the lecture was supported by a wealth of stories, and slides, which brought the subject directly to the imagination. She was heartily thanked at the close. The whole proceeds of the lecture were for the Scottish Women's Hospital and the Hon E Haverfield's Comforts Fund for Serbian Soldiers.

28 February 1918

Sir JS Ainsworth, MP, and Sir JD Rees, MP, addressed a meeting on War Aims this week in the Dale Street Hall, Workington, under the presidency of Mr RH Hodgson. The Chairman made reference to the effort to be made next week for Workington to raise £ 75,000 in National War Bonds, and said that although the amount seemed enormous in view of what had been done in the past they were confident that the sum aimed at would be raised. Sir JS Ainsworth said that Workington  had already got a great name through what it had already done for war funds. Sir JD Rees said this war was against the Prussians and our war aims were to preserve the British Empire and our own independence, which were threatened as they had never been before.

01 March 1918

Holm Cultram Local Tribunal was held at Abbey Town this week. One case  referred to George Grey, shepherd, Hartlow, employed by Mr Armstrong, a member of the Holm Cultram District Council. Grey had been rejected for the Army, and Mr Armstrong said the man was no use for the Army; he could not see across the table. He did not know his own age - whether he was 36 or 46, and he was not fit to go to the Volunteer drills.

02 March 1918

LADIES FOOTBALL Barrow (Vickers)  v Glasgow (Beardmore's) This match, extensively advertised as an 'International!' England v Scotland throughout Glasgow, was played on Saturday at Parkhead, the home of Glasgow Celtic Club, before 15,000 spectators in fine weather. The turf had been frozen hard in the morning and the coach of the Barrow team did not decide on the eleven until half an hour before kick-off.  The game finished in a brilliant  4 - 0 win to Barrow.

03 March 1918

The Young Men's' Christian Association have just completed at the Rowrah Camp for war prisoners a well-appointed hut for the use of the officers and men, on guard at the camp. The main room is 40 feet by 26 feet in area and is well lighted, electricity having recently been installed in the camp. The room is well heated and equipped for refreshments, writing, reading, recreation and games, including billiards, there being  an excellent library, a refreshment buffet and a platform and piano for concerts.

04 March 1918

CARLISLE'S DESTROYER WEEK. Monday March 4th to Saturday March 9th. Every penny taken at the City Picture House next week will be invested in WAR BONDS. Come and help the 'CITY'  to launch the City's Destroyer.

05 March 1918

WORKINGTON TOWN COUNCIL. At the meeting today it was intimated by the Army authorities that owing to the need for doctors in the Army Medical Service it would not be justifiable to ask for the demobilisation of Dr Thomson, Workington's Medical Officer of Health.

06 March 1918

THE WAR OVER I hope to return to my business in Kendal. In the meantime I wish to thank my numerous customers for the ready support they have given to Mrs Birkett, who is managing the business during my temporary absence. The only address - BIRKETT'S, The London Drapers, Kendal. My temporary Address is still ''Doing-my-bit' IN FRANCE. Another advert from France next week. Advert sent to Blighty by WC Birkett [This week's Westmorland Gazette]

07 March 1918

Thursday 7th March, Friday 8th Saturday 9th ALHAMBRA PALACE, Penrith. Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Enormous and Expensive Super Attraction (7 Reels - 7,500 feet) WOMANHOOD; The Glory of the Nation. (Companion Picture of An American's Home.) Featuring Alice Joyce, Peggy Hyland, Harry Morey and all the Vitagraph Stars. Stupendous! Thrilling! Wonderful!  AERIAL TORPEDOES!  GAS ATTACKS!  SUBMARINES!  ZEPPELINS IN ACTION! A NAVY DESTROYED. (Please come early for Good Seats, as we must start this picture prompt to Time!) Popular prices: Circle 1s 1d; Stalls 8d: Pit 4d. Children: Circle 7d, Stalls 4d, Pit 2d.

08 March 1918

The Chats with Children column in today's Carlisle Journal had the following contribution. "Home at 6:30 today." Oh, what excitement that telegram causes in his dear old home. Father is all joy, mother seems to tread on air, so quickly does she step about the house ,making a true welcome for her dear boy; whilst brothers and sisters all join in, and assist to make the welcome one of joy. Bang goes the gate. He has arrived. And we all rush forward. Mother first, then father, afterwards sisters and brothers. How we welcome him, how we feast him, and at night we sit up late to hear his wonderful stories; very modest, but oh! so glorious. Do not we younger brothers  envy him, for we cannot by reason of our youth be in the fight too. What a giant he has grown, and so different now, not a bit particular, for he had 'roughed' it, and nothing seems to worry him. His short leave slipped away, all too quickly, and the farewell came all too soon.  We all went to see him off, and whilst we were sorry to part with him we felt proud of him; for we all felt that His country needed him. We wished him good-bye, and all hoped that he would return to us with the honours of victory

09 March 1918

THIS WAR MAY BE DECIDED IN THE AIR. Penrith and District are asked to provide £ 50,000  to buy 20 AEROPLANES at £ 2,500 each. BE PATRIOTIC and Buy War Bonds and War Certificates. Note the Date - March 4th to 9th. PENRITHIANS, DO YOUR BIT.

10 March 1918

KIRKOSWALD MINISTER INJURED. Yesterday, Saturday, while the Rev TF Watson, superintendent of Kirkoswald Wesleyan Circuit, was, through labour shortage, helping to lop felled trees on Fog Close Farm, he cut his right leg severely. He was unable to take services  today.

11 March 1918

At Penrith this week, Watson Sykes, manager of the London City and Midland Bank at Penrith was fined £ 2 and costs by the Penrith Bench for having unlawfully obtained half a pound of sugar on the sugar card of his daughter, who was at school; and Miss J Sykes, his sister, was fined a similar sum for having aided in the offence.

Cockermouth Rural District Council. Mr DN Pape moved, and Mr CF Watson seconded, and it was agreed, that the Council subscribe £ 10 towards the fund for the provision of comforts for the men engaged on road construction in France. The Chairman said that the Council had 36 of their workmen, and Mr Gibson, their Surveyor, out in France.

12 March 1918

Submarine HMS H28 launched at Barrow [Scrapped 1944].

13 March 1918

KENDAL POLICE COURT. Thomas Stuart, of Kendal, was brought up in custody charged with being a deserter since November 28th - P.S.O' Connor said on Saturday night, 9th September, he saw the prisoner at the Wheat Sheaf. He said 'You are a deserter", Prisoner said 'I think you are mistaken'. Prisoner was published in the official record as being a deserter from the Royal Flying Corps. Prisoner denied this, and produced a discharge from the Army dated 1915 - Prisoner now said he had been discharged from the Army ten times, twice during the war, as medically unfit. It was not for want of trying. He would let any doctor in the town examine him. Prisoner was remanded for a military escort, and a reward was granted to the sergeant.

14 March 1918

DESERTER CAMPING OUT. At Wigton today - before R Carruthers, Esq - Private Joseph Mason, labour battalion, South Lancs Regiment, was charged with being an absentee from Sheffield since September 15th. When arrested by PC Roddick he was living with his wife and two children in an outhouse in a fields near The Hards, Wigton. The Magistrate remanded the prisoner to await an escort, and awarded the constable 10s.

15 March 1918

Glinger Bank Auxiliary Hospital, Longtown, opens.

16 March 1918

Submarine HMS L12 launched at Barrow.[Scrapped 1932].

17 March 1918

FREESTONE, Pte Jas W.,  Lancashire Fusiliers. Through the agency of the Red Cross Society's inquiry department for wounded and missing, Mrs Freeston of Murray's Yard, Stricklandgate, Kendal, has received tidings of the death of her husband, Pte Jas W. Freeston. A comrade of Freeston who is now in hospital in Liverpool furnished the following statement to the department: 'I knew Freeston. We went over the top in an attack on October 9th 1917. We kept close to each other. After securing our objective we took cover by digging ourselves in, and while waiting a shell burst upon us, wounding several and killing Freeston. I have no doubt about the occurrence. I was not wounded myself'. Pte Freeston joined the Border Regiment in November 1916; he was afterwards transferred to the Lancashire Fusiliers, and in May of last year went out to France. He was 36 years of age, and his wife has two young children. Previous to joining he was a mason with Mr Pennington, builder.

18 March 1918

MARYPORT URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL. PIG REARING. Messrs J Wharton and Son write asking the Council's permission to allow their employees to keep pigs in their store yard, Irish Street. Mr Hardy said it was very creditable to the proprietors of these works that they were determined to do all they possibly could to increase the supply of food. It was also desirable the Council should take something of this sort - Permission was granted, and a committee appointed to consider the general question.

19 March 1918

DURAFIT'S MODEL TANK COMPETITION FOR BOYS; We will give three prizes, in clothing, value 10s, 5s and 2s6d, and three consolation prizes of 1s each, to the boys under 14 years of age who make the best Model Tanks or Armoured Cars. We will supply at a penny each a full set of parts - printed in Cardboard - these most be cut out and put together. Models must be sent in no later than Tuesday 26th March, and each boy must certify that he has made the model himself. Only one prize to each boy. Apply S Redmayne and Sons Ltd, Carlisle, Workington, Whitehaven, Penrith, Wigton, Maryport etc.

20 March 1918

The large number of appeals at the Wigton Military Tribunal on Monday yielded only one man for the army - and he was a boy as someone remarked. With every sitting the cases grow more difficult to deal with. One thing is certain; the task of the Tribunal is an unenviable one.

21 March 1918

THE MINERS COMB-OUT. Adverse majority in Cumberland. The members of the Cumberland Miners' Association have voted as follows in the ballot on the question of the recruitment of 50,000 men for the Army from the coal mining industry. Shall the Miners' Federation of Great Britain agree to the withdrawal of 50,000 men from the mines for military service? For the proposition 1,857, Against 2,587. Majority 730. Those who did not vote formed a considerable proportion of the total membership of the Cumberland Miners' Association, which is about 7,000.

22 March 1918

WANTED PHOTO AS SOUVENIR. Charlemagne Lescart, a tall Belgian munitions worker, appeared on remand at the Barrow Police Court on this morning on a charge of unlawfully taking photos in the new Shell Shop on Sunday. The defendant said he wanted the photos as a souvenir. His friends called him the 'the big boy' as he was full of fun. He was a Belgian soldier who was at the siege of Antwerp. He was wounded and succeeded in making it to England. He had set to work on munitions and had been at Barrow for three years. He said he knew he could not take photographs without permission, but a group of Belgian and English workmen asked him to take a photo, so that he might take it to Belgium after the war. He was sorry. The accused was fined 10s and costs (15s).

23 March 1918

The owner of a pig wished to kill it and share it with his friends but fearing he might come under the regulations against hoarding , he asked his local Food Committee to advise him on the point. Here is their answer; 'Re killing pig - This is permissible if done in moderation'. This story is told by a correspondent in Saturday's 'Spectator'. He does not give the address but there are those who suggest that it might be Kendal. Truly, one cannot exclude this possibility, nor deny that some things even funnier than this answer may be revealed in Kendal before our food troubles have an end in joy and peace and plenty  [Today's Westmorland Gazette].

24 March 1918

MEETING FOR MEN. Organised by the local branch of the Council for combating Venereal Disease. TIVOLI, FORSHAW STREET, BARROW-IN-FURNESS.  SUNDAY, 24th March, 3pm. Speakers Dr RA Harper and HR Elliott.  Chairman, the MAYOR (Mr Alderman BAROW, OBE.) Selection of music by the Shell Shop Male Voice Choir.

25 March 1918

The Super Cinema, Abbey Road, Barrow-in-Furness.
All the week at the Matinee only, The Life of LORD KITCHENER (Exclusive). Splendid All British Production of the Life-work of the Great British Field Marshall. 'Every man, woman and child in the Kingdom should see this interesting and timely attraction' London Press.

26 March 1918

Mr and Mrs J Holliday, 68 Queen Street, Aspatria, received an official telegram this evening from the Secretary of the War Office informing them that their son, Second Lieutenant J Holliday, R.F.A., was reported missing on March 21st; this does not  (the telegram stated) necessarily mean killed or wounded. His elder brother Second Lieutenant HL Holliday, was killed in December whilst serving with the Salonika forces.

27 March 1918

NON-FERROUS METAL. Messrs F McCumiskey hold the munitions permit to purchase Copper and Aluminium in less than 56 lb consignments and Lead in less than 112 lb consignments. Any quantity (large or small) purchased. THESE METALS ARE URGENTLY REQUIRED FOR WAR PURPOSES. You will be doing a patriotic action by looking up all the Metal you have lying about and communicating with P McCUMISKEY, Crown Works, Crown Street, Carlisle. If metal is sent to the above Address remittance for full value  will be forwarded at once.

28 March 1918

Mr Charles Hornung, Send Manor, Ripley, Surrey, applied for a faculty to place on the south wall of St George's Church, Millom, a white marble tablet in memory of Charles Alfred Peter Horning (grandson of Mr Thomas Barlow-Massicks), C Company 18th (UPS) Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, killed in action in France, 7th February 1916, aged 18 years and 9 months. The Chancellor of the Diocese said in consideration of the request that he questioned whether the Court was justified in granting permission for the putting up memorials to persons who did not belong to the parish. Except under special circumstances the Court would not have granted this faculty.

29 March 1918

The Mayor of Workington received a communication informing him of the death of Second Lieutenant Warwick in action and asking him to break the news to his father, Mr John Warwick, the Town Clerk of Workington. He was serving his articles with Messrs Broatch and Son, Solicitors, Keswick, when he joined the forces. He was Mr Warwick's only son.

30 March 1918

CRISIS OF THE WAR. Today's Barrow News editorial said:  For over a week now the British Army has been fighting the greatest battle in the world's history, and fighting, it need hardly be added, as was only to be expected; every inch of ground contested to the last against the overwhelming forces the enemy  had been able to bring against  it through the defection of Russia…the Russian Iscariots, known as Bolsheviks, who sold their country for German pieces of silver.
[Reference to Operation Michael, the German offensive which began on  March 21st 1918]

31 March 1918

The Chief Constable of Carlisle  reported that during March the convictions in the city for drunkenness numbered seven, against forty-eight last year, for assaults on the police none, against four last year. For the first three months of the year convictions for drunkenness numbered 36 as against 164 in the corresponding quarter last year. This year there was only one conviction for assault against the police, against eight last year.

01 April 1918

The 53rd anniversary of the Carlisle Caldewgate Wesleyan Methodist Sunday School was celebrated yesterday, Easter Sunday, and today, Easter Monday. This afternoon, Monday, a small sale of work was arranged to take the place of the usual public tea, which had  to be abandoned this year owing to the food restrictions.

02 April 1918

YOUNG LADY Wanted immediately, to act as Deputy Collector for a well-known Insurance Society; to work the Agency of a gentleman now on active service in France. A liberal salary and commission to the right person. Address in confidence. 701, Carlisle Journal.

03 April 1918

Wigton; Roslin Castle. At ten pm this evening Police Constable Watson (Mealsgate) visited the home of Driver J Blaylock's, an army deserter from Preston who had been absent without leave since September 23rd. His mother said prisoner was not at home and had not been seen for three months. Later the constable saw prisoner enter the house by a back way, and heard his mother tell him that the police were after him and advising him to get out. Two men then came out, and one went away on a bicycle. Watson followed on his bicycle, and found it was Blaylock, who about midnight near Hall Bank threw his machine on the road and went into a field. Blaylock said it was a bad job, and offered £ 2 to be let off.  Blaylock appeared at Wigton and was remanded for escort.

04 April 1918

Canon Sutton presided  today at a sitting at Carlisle of the County Appeals Tribunal at which there were 26 cases on the list.  Eleven of the cases  were from Carlisle City, six from Wigton Rural, one from Aspatria, two from Holm Cultram, one from Penrith Urban, one from Grasmere, one from South Westmorland and three from East Westmorland. Captain Lambert was the National Service representative. Speaking in opposition to the National Service appeal regarding SP Ashbridge, 28, single, class A, butcher and farmer at Caldbeck, Mr Hetherington said that his client had already 600 meat cards to deal with, and the wide hilly district around could not be supplied with meat if only one butcher was left in Caldbeck. Captain Lambert said he must press for this man who was single and class A. The National Service appeal was allowed.

05 April 1918

I have been having a rough time of it since I went out to France. I was up in the front line during the whole bombardment and I may venture to say it was hell upon earth. I can't describe it in writing; it would take too long. From March 21st until March 24th when I was wounded, I got no sleep. We were fighting day and night, and the only food that I was able to snatch was one slice of bread and half-pint of tea for three days. So you can judge the kind of time we have been enjoying. But I am glad to say Fritz has not had his own way. Our heavies gave him as much as he wanted, and I am afraid it will take him some time to bury his dead. He was glad to dig in again. My God, he has lost some men. We have lost some, but the Germans have had a proper combing out by our guns.
Letter in this week's  Westmorland Gazette.

06 April 1918

WANTED for Broad Leys Officers' Hospital, Windermere, Head Working Gardener and Wife and Daughter,  to live in lodge. Discharged soldier or ineligible Man desired. Wife and Daughter to assist in Hospital. For particulars as to wages etc apply to Mrs Currer Briggs, Broad Leys, Windermere.

07 April 1918

Reference was made by the British Medical Journal in the last issue to the extreme difficulty of collecting and evacuating casualties, which was part of the experience of the British in the hasty retirement upon the Somme a fortnight since. Casualty clearing stations had to be abandoned and many wounded fell into the hands of the enemy and were included in the reports as prisoners. While the battle was still raging an alarming rumour ran through Kendal in regard to a casualty clearing station in which the town is specially interested.  'Wiped out' was the short and sweeping phrase in which the news was put, before it had been in circulation an hour. It was of course wrong. The personnel of the unit retired alright; but stores, equipment and belongings had been left behind. According to the British Medical Journal all accounts agree as to the splendid behaviour of those serving in such units; and there is no reason to doubt that the unit referred to deserved the praise as much as any.
This week's Westmorland Gazette.

08 April 1918

HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE,  King's Bench Division. Barrow in Furness District Registry.  Between SM Kropman, Plaintiff and  Andrew Scott Cowie, Defendant. The above action has been taken against me by Mr Kropman, claiming damages  for slander in respect of statement made by me relating upon his nationality and  business methods. PUBLIC APOLOGY to Mr SM Kropman, 256 Dalton Road, Barrow in Furness. I hereby UNRESERVEDLY withdraw every such statement which I admit were untrue. I deeply regret that I ever made them and tender him my sincere apologies, therefore, I have today paid to his Solicitor all the costs that have been incurred in the above action which he has commenced against me, and also in accordance with Mr Kropman's request  have paid a further sum of £ 5 5s to the Mayor of Barrow's Soldiers' Comforts Fund as an amend for the injury and annoyance I have caused him. Mr Kropman is a British citizen and to the best of my knowledge has always in the past and is now personally conducting his Dental Practice at no 256 Dalton Road, Barrow in Furness. Signed Andrew Scott Cowie, 53  Storey Square, Barrow in Furness.

09 April 1918

THE CHADWICK HOSPITAL, Carlisle. The beds are now full and several convalescents have been sent to Castletown, Rockcliffe. An allotment has been taken for the use of the hospital and is being worked by the patients themselves. Mr John Bracken has undertaken to help the men in the evenings. One evening Mrs Lightfoot arranged a concert in the wards and had the help of Miss Sowter, who was spending a few days in Carlisle. She was accompanied by Mr Marriner, with Miss Lightfoot as pianist. The men were charmed with Miss Sowter's singing and Mr Lightfoot's recitations. Miss May Fryers, one of the staff, has presented an altar cloth and chalice veil to the hospital.

10 April 1918

THANKS FOR SYMPATHY. Mrs. Sam Rigg wishes to express her most grateful thanks to all friends who have so kindly sympathised with her in her terrible anxiety for her husband, and hopes in time to answer all letters. She received, at noon on April 10th, a War Office correction wire saying that Major Rigg, Border Regiment, was now reported 'wounded and missing' instead of 'killed in action' as previously reported.

11 April 1918

People in Kendal and other parts of the north have many proofs that men serving in the R.A.M.C. are not exempt from the extreme hazards of the campaign. Amongst such proofs afforded in the course of the present battle was the death of two brothers belonging to Carlisle serving in the same unit of the R.A.M.C., and killed by the explosion of the same shell at an advanced dressing station, where two medical officers were also among the dead.
This week's Westmorland Gazette

12 April 1918

STRONG LAD or MAN WANTED , ineligible for Army:- Apply, Hudson, Newton-in-Cartmel  [Advert in this week's Barrow News].

13 April 1918

John Hall, farmer of Rosley, notes in his diary today: 'We have bad news of the war, our side are getting driven back in France by the Germans. The military age has been raised to 50 and conscription extended to Ireland'.

14 April 1918

Some fifty or sixty Church Army huts have been lost in the British retirement, but the saddest loss is that of the Hospital of Friendship. It was taken out in January 1915, as a gift of Mrs Frank Stoop to Belgium by Lady Bagot, of Levens, who (with a sound experience of war nursing gained in the Boer War) remained with it, the only woman there for two years. Prebandary Carlisle's son worked for it as a chauffeur. It accommodated 26 wounded, or at a pinch 40, and it had to deal with some of the earliest cases of gassing. Stationed about seven miles behind the Front, it was constantly bombed from the air - one day as many as 23 bombs fell around it. Its story makes a fine chapter in the history of the heroic British hospital missions during the war. [This week's Carlisle Journal].

15 April 1918

 CONISTON PARISH COUNCIL. Meeting was held today. On the motion of the Rev FT Wilcox, seconded by the chairman, it was decided to enter in the parish records the pride, admiration and thankfulness of the Council for the glorious stand of the 55th Division, probably the best known stand in English history, the chairman remarking that undoubtedly the 55th Division had saved the situation.

16 April 1918

CONISTON. BILLETING ACT OF 1917 - Today representatives of the Ministry of Munitions distributed forms in the village with a view to compiling a register of accommodation for billeting persons engaged in work of national importance.

17 April 1918

PARKER, Edward Henry. Mr and Mrs J Parker, Park Road, Milnthorpe, this week, received information that their second son, Edward Henry Parker, Border Regiment, had been killed in action in France. He was 21, and when he enlisted in January 1917, was working for Mr HC Hodgson, High Foulshaw. His brother, Jack Parker, also of the Border Regiment, was reported missing six months ago.

18 April 1918

THE IDEAL PRESENT. A framed enlargement, in black and white, sepia, or water colours, from PARKER'S PARISH CHURCH GATES, Kendal. Soldiers' portraits a speciality. Send the small photo today. Best quality obtainable. [This week's Westmorland Gazette].

19 April 1918

SITUATIONS WANTED.  INVALID OFFICER Seeks Employment. National importance preferred, good education and energetic. Box 727 Carlisle Journal.

20 April 1918

BARROW IN FURNESS FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE. To Butchers, Grocers, Provision Dealers, Caterers, Confectioners, and Others. NOTICE. Meat of every description, Cooked or Uncooked, must only be sold on surrender of coupons. Vendors of pies may supply two or more pies in exchange for one coupon, provided that they contain not more than 3oz of meat collectively. Bacon must only be sold in exchange for coupons. Jas Johnson, Executive Officer.

21 April 1918

Saturday. NOTICE TO FARMERS. We beg to inform our Customers that the sale of all Fallen, Broken or Gathered Wool is now prohibited. We hold a Government Licence, however, to purchase Daggings. C and M Pickles [Advert in this week's Westmorland Gazette].

22 April 1918

WOMEN'S LAND ARMY. The Government is appealing for 30,000 WOMEN to work on the Land, to take the place of men now joining the Army and to provide additional labour for Food production. Workers are wanted at once for spring work and are assured of regular and congenial occupation throughout the year. Recruits are earnestly called upon to come forward at office and enrol themselves with the Women's Land Army. For the particulars apply to THE EMPLOYMENT EXCHANGE, KENDAL; or  MISS DICKSON, Abbots Reading, Haverthwaite, Ulverston.

23 April 1918

Among the men who took part in the raid on Zeebrugge today were Seamen Joseph Baxter, King Street, Maryport, who was killed leaving a widow and three children, and Stoker John Palmer, Fleming Street, Maryport, wounded in the arm. Stoker Palmer's parents within the past fortnight have thus heard of two sons wounded and one killed. Private B P Thornthwaite, South Street, Cockermouth, came through the raid safely.

24 April 1918

The Rev James W Hall, who is reported missing, was formerly curate of Wigton, and also at Maryport. Last year he was awarded the Military Medal, and he has since received a bar to the medal. He was last seen helping the wounded on March 24th, and has not been heard of since.

25 April 1918

Mr W Laird, Chairman of the Cockermouth Board of Guardians, has had a letter from his son, Gunner F Laird, RFA, who says 'We are now behind the lines waiting to be re-equipped, having lost nearly everything. If you people in England could only see the sights we have seen then you would know what a war was. Fancy farmers in England having to leave their stocks in the fields and flee for their lives. That's what hundreds have had to do here. Last night was the first night I have had my clothes off for 20 days, so I had a grand sleep; we have had hardly any since this affair started. We have had some hard times, and some good ones - I mean as regards grub, which the French people have left in the farms. Some of the villages we have been in the people cleared out, so of course, we could get what we wanted - plenty of fowls, wines etc'.

26 April 1918

CIGARETTE GIFT - By the kindness of Millom residents in India, any Millom soldiers (either serving or in training) in the town can obtain a free packet of cigarettes by applying at Mr Atkinson's shop in the Square. [Barrow Evening News].

27 April 1918

Barrow. Submarine HMS H25 launched. [Scrapped 1929].

28 April 1918

THE BEACON AS A WAR MEMORIAL. At the last meeting of Penrith Urban District Council a letter was read from the Trades and Labour Council asking the Council to take the initiative in approaching the trustees of the Lowther estate with a view to the purchase of the Beacon by the town, by public subscription, as a permanent memorial to the Penrith men who have fallen in the war. Mr Elliott said it was rather a tall order. It would not be wise to consider the question of purchasing the whole, but he suggested  that approaches might be made with a view to ascertaining if there would be any disposition to sell the portion on the town side of the Pike. The matter was referred to the General Purposes Committee.

29 April 1918

The Countess of Lonsdale is one of the latest donors of pearls to the Red Cross Necklace appeal.

30 April 1918

This week's Barrow News reported that a brass tablet had been erected in the Dalton Wesleyan Church in honour of Private Thomas C Varcoe who died in France in September 1916. The plaque, unveiled by his brother John, was placed just above the seat where the deceased soldier sat.

01 May 1918

Workington. William Entwhistle, aged 21, pleaded guilty at Workington this week to being a deserter from the Middlesex Regiment. He told Sergeant Stewart that he had been discharged and produced a discharge paper, which however belonged to a brother discharged from the Royal Naval Division. He was remanded to await an escort.

02 May 1918

MILLOM; Private John Stephens, Kings Own Liverpool Regiment, one of three sons (all serving) of Mrs Stephens, 42 Devonshire Road, Millom, is officially reported missing, the news being received today, 2nd May. He went to France two years ago and had only returned some eight weeks after being invalided out. His age is 32, and he was formerly in the Co-operative Society's employ at Millom and Liverpool. Hopes are entertained that he may  be a prisoner.

03 May 1918

Carlisle. There was today in the Town Hall a presentation of  medals of the Order of the British Empire to Miss Norah Morphet, Mrs Joan Nelson, both of Carlisle and Miss Ada Watt, Port Carlisle,  Lord Lonsdale, representing the King, presented the medals. Miss Watt and Mrs Nelson were awarded the medals for courage in continuing to work in an explosives factory under circumstances of grave danger. Miss Morphet's award was for courage and high example in continuing to work many hours in a poisonous atmosphere which habitually affected her health. Lord Lonsdale personally congratulated each lady amid cheers.

04 May 1918

The Barrow News today reported that the Mayor and Mayoress of Barrow had received a postcard from their son, Captain Barrow, saying that he was in a hospital at Cassell, suffering from a broken left thigh. He added that he is going on favourably and is being treated well.

05 May 1918

The ninth memorial service in connection with the death of parishioners in the war was held at St James Church, Carlisle, this evening, which was the last occasion on which the Vicar, Rev DE Davies, occupied the pulpit prior to his departure for service among the convalescent soldiers at the front. The pulpit and part of the chancel has been draped with the Union Jack and purple and the service, which was of an impressive nature, was attended by one of the largest congregations which the church has contained, a double row of seats having been placed in the aisles. The death roll at present for the parish stands at 138 men.

06 May 1918

BOTCHERGATE PICTURE HOUSE, Carlisle. The Premier Cinema. Visit the Cosy Cafe which now offers a  3-Course Vegetarian Luncheon. 1/2.  (No Meat Coupons Required). Daily from 12-30 till 2pm.

07 May 1918

DALTON MILITARY TRIBUNAL was held  in Dalton Town Hall this week , May 11th, to deal with 22 cases. It was said that Gerald Brocklebank, a cowman of Marton, whose name was on the list, had been in the Army for two years. John Rigg, butcher, Askham, was sent for medical examination, case to come on again at the next sitting. Harry Hancock, Dalton, shell rectifier, had his case adjourned for a fortnight pending a medical examination.

08 May 1918

WAR HOSPITAL SUPPLY. In our list of contributions of this fund last week the amount contributed by St Paul's Church £ 18 5s 5d, and Miss Rutherford should have been Mrs Rutherford.
This week's Barrow News.

09 May 1918

Submarine HMS H30 launched at Barrow [Scrapped 1935].

10 May 1918

This week's West Cumberland Times reported that Private Edward Gilbert Speight aged 19, had been killed in action in France, where he had been drafted only 6 weeks earlier. He had worked at Maryport Co-operative and was brought up by his grandmother, Mrs Watson of the Volunteer Inn, Broughton. Edward entered the Broughton boys school on the 3rd July 1905.

11 May 1918

A sitting of the Wigton Urban Military Tribunal was held this afternoon, Mr R Carruthers presiding. The National Service Representative, Mr Phelps,  applied for the withdrawal of the certificate of William Peacock (35, C1), a presser with Messrs Redmayne and Sons, Wigton. Mr Harrison Dixon, manager, said the work was too heavy for women, as the irons were about 17lbs weight. About 50% of their work was Government work. Mr Phelps asked for the man to be sent for medical examination, in order to be graded, and this course was adopted.

12 May 1918

The Very Latest. RATION CARD PROTECTOR. Neat Case. 3d and 6d each. T McMechan's, Stationer, Wigton.

13 May 1918

Submarine HMS L17 launched at Barrow [Scrapped 1934].

14 May 1918

Submarine HMS R7 launched at Barrow [Scrapped 1923].

15 May 1918

Corporal Tweddle, Black Watch, Kirkcambeck, was killed in action on April 18th. An officer writes 'He was one of the best NCO's in the company, and did his duty on all occasions to the utmost. He fell fighting gallantly with many of his comrades. His death has been bitterly avenged by his comrades, and the Germans paid dearly for their attack. He was dearly loved and esteemed by officers and men alike'.

16 May 1918

The County Appeals Tribunal was held in Carlisle today. 'He is the only son we have left out of three, my two elder sons have both laid down their lives for their King and country", remarked Mr Hunter, farmer, Scalesmoor, Lamplugh in appealing for Jackson Hunter, aged 18, single and grade 1, described as a ploughman and general husbandman. He added that his wife was paralysed and if this lad had to go the consequences would be more serious still. The appeal was allowed and the man remains in his present occupation.

17 May 1918

ROSE CASTLE WORK PARTY. Mrs Diggle [The Bishop of Carlisle's wife] has during the last month sent to Lady Lonsdale's Committee, to Miss Creighton for the Carlisle Women's League and to Lady Valda Machell for the Border Regiment, 60 pairs of socks, 8 shirts, 2 mufflers, 4 pairs of mittens and 75 hospital bags, sent by the household at Rose Castle and friends at  Raughton Head, Gaitsgill, Sebergham, Nether Welton, Stockdalewath, Sowerby Row and the neighbourhood.

18 May 1918

Corporal J W Towers (Border Regiment), eldest son of Mr J Towers, Millbeck, Lorton, who won the Military Medal on March 24th for conspicuous bravery, sent home the following letter: "The Germans were all around, and attacked a post with only eight of us in it. Five were killed, and the other three of us held on until dark, and fought our way out. We ran into three Hun officers and bayoneted them, and had to run through a trail of machine gun bullets. I was the only one who got out alright, although I got a hole through my pants and one through my hat. Another of the remaining two  got wounded in the left arm, and one was killed. The next night was much the same. I held on to my post as long as possible, and was the only one left when I retired.  I did not go far until I found Major Rigg wounded in a shell hole. I stayed and dressed him, and waited until dark again. I took him to an R.A.P., but had to leave him there and bolt, for once more I was surrounded. I came across two Lancashire lads with a Lewis gun, and told them they were surrounded, and to keep still. After about half an hour we heard the Germans talking in front of us, and could see them walking about amongst the debris, silhouetted against the sky. We put a pan onto the gun, and rattled it to one side, from the centre, and then another pan to the other side. How we got through, God knows, but the Huns were surprised when we fired into their rear, and ran like mad…I shook hands with myself when I got relieved."

19 May 1918

At Keswick today, John Fleming Brownrigg, farmer's son, Millbeck Hall, was charged under the Defence of the Realm Act with making a fire and keeping it burning in such a manner as to serve as a signal, guide or landmark. Police-constable Martin stated that on 25th April he saw a fire burning on Dalts fell about three miles from Keswick. He charged defendant who said he set the ling on fire to get grass for the sheep. He looked after dark, and seeing no fire thought it was out. Witness cautioned defendant's father last year about a similar thing, and defendant was present at the time. The Chairman said the magistrates considered this a very serious offence, but as it was the first of the kind that had come before them they would let defendant off with a fine of £ 3.00.

20 May 1918

Appleby hiring was held today, but it existed in name rather than fact, for there were few men out of employment. Where farm servants were free to negotiate they almost invariably asked for more than the high wages at last hiring. Female labour can scarcely be said to have come into the open market.

21 May 1918

PENRITH. Not in living memory has there been such small attendance at a Penrith Whitsuntide hiring as was the case this morning. There was good demand for strong lads below military age, which the supply did not meet. The circumstances are such that it is practically impossible to quote trustworthy figures, but generally wages were from £ 1 to £ 2 higher than at last Whitsuntide hiring. Female labour for domestic service was very scarce, doubtless on account of their being more attractive openings for girls.

22 May 1918

Vagrancy in Barrow is at a very low ebb just now, and well it ought to be considering that men who are able for any class of work are in such demand, Of course, there are still men who although able, are not very keen to work. They don't know the meaning of the word, It is not likely, however, that able-bodied men will be given a night's 'doss' at the casual ward down at Roose. The tramp has largely disappeared. The war has effected this desirable change and measures ought to be adopted to avoid a recurrence of the vagrancy evil after the fighting is over. Work must be found for all who are fit, and those who are disabled, physically unfit or mentally deranged must be cared for by the state.
Comment in this week's Barrow News

23 May 1918

Taking advantage of the Whitsuntide hirings a recruiting campaign in connection with the 'Women's Land Army'  was started at Ulverston this afternoon. About forty buxom lasses from the training centre at Broughton near Preston, looking very smart in their new uniforms, arrived on the scene of action early in the forenoon in charge of Mr and Mrs Richings and forming in procession, headed by the wounded soldiers and nurses from Fair View Military Hospital, marched around the town, carrying banners on which were inscribed the sentiments 'The lasses are massing for the spring offensive' 'Join the Land Army and hold the home front', 'We want the men in the field and the women in the fields' and 'We are all fit in the Land Army'.

24 May 1918

In times past the preservation of meat during very hot weather caused housewives no little anxiety. Now, however the Food Controller has been instrumental in relieving them of the trouble. There are no uncooked joints in the pantry now, or in the pickling tub, for out meat ration is intended to supply only one day's needs, or at most provide for the morrow's necessity.
Our Ladies Budget, Carlisle Journal.

25 May 1918

The first award of the Victoria Cross to an officer of the Border Regiment since the Crimea War was announced in the local press this week. Lieutenant-Colonel Forbes-Robertson was commended for this conspicuous bravery whilst commanding the battalion during the heavy fighting. On four separate occasions he saved the line from breaking. Lieutenant-Colonel Forbes-Robertson, of Scottish parentage, was educated at Sedbergh School.

26 May 1918

Among the prisoners of war who have arrived in Holland from Germany for internment are Private J. Campbell (29102) and Private R. Wells (5030), Border Regiment.

27 May 1918

Westmorland Gazette. By arrangement of the RSPCA a 'Butterfly Day' collection has been made on behalf of wounded and war-worn horses in the following villages: Arnside £ 25, Beetham £ 7, Heversham and Milnthorpe £ 15.12s; and the total of £ 7 12s has been handed over to the society.

28 May 1918

A sale in aid of the Spark Bridge War Relief Sewing Meeting has been held at Springfield, Colton, from which the funds will benefit to the extent of about £ 70.

29 May 1918

This evening 56 wounded soldiers arrived at Kendal station for the VAD. There were 40 cot cases and 16 walking cases, and they were quickly detrained under the direction of Surgeon-Colonel Brumwell and Surgeon-Major Noble.

30 May 1918

SOLDIERS AND CIVILIANS WRITING PADS; in great variety from 4d. Townley and Taylor, 33 Allhallows Lane, Kendal.

31 May 1918

Empire Day at Milnthorpe. On Friday the flags were hoisted. At the National Boys School Mrs McNabb celebrated the day by singing patriotic songs and by special lessons on patriotism, after which each boy wrote an essay on the subject. In the afternoon they marched on to the Sands, where the Union Jack was unfurled, and the boys marched past and saluted.

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14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1918
November
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
1918
December
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1919
January
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1919
February
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
1919
March
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1919
April
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30