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Stories from around the county about local people
June 1917
  • 7th: British mines detonated on the Messines Ridge, Western Front
  • 8th: Tenth battle of Isonzo ends, Italian Front
  • 9th: Russian Provisional Government refuse German armistice proposal
  • 13th: German air raid on London, 157 killed
  • 14th: Battle of Messines ends, Western Front
  • 17th: First Portuguese troops in action on Western Front
  • 18th: Von Richtofen, the Red Baron, claims his 53rd victory
  • 25th: First American troops arrive in France
The First World War in Cumbria day by day
TODAY

31 July 1916

A Cockermouth Rural Tribunal met at Grecian Villa, Cockermouth today. A stonebreaker, 40 years of age, with seven children, living in Embleton, was exempted Military Service. He was told amid laughter that his case required no consideration.

01 August 1916

Open every day from 2:30. THE CITY PICTURE HOUSE. ENGLISH STREET, CARLISLE. Today(Tuesday) & Wednesday only. The French official war film. "The Defence of Verdun." A remarkable series of pictures taken in and around the town.

02 August 1916

Twenty convalescent soldiers arrived at the Bleasdale House Hospital, Silverdale today from Lord Derby's Hospital at Warrington.

03 August 1916

Brampton Union. PERSON or persons required to take charge of Institution for period of War only. Retired Poor Law Officials (male or female) preferred but not essential. Salaries, Master £ 45; Matron £ 30, per annum, with Apartments etc. Applications to the undersigned by 14th August, 1916. THOS. E. BAXTER, Clerk. Union Offices, Brampton, Cumberland, 3rd August 1916.

04 August 1916

Mr and Mrs C.H. Shaw, Eaton Hall, have offered to place a large part of their house at the disposal of the Penrith Military Hospital for more beds in case of need, and Mr and Miss Bolton have made a similar offer with regards to Leming-on-Ullswater.

05 August 1916

Mr. C. Very, treasurer of the Belgian Sustentation Fund in Kendal, reports receipts to April 30th, £ 23 7s. 7d., and disbursements: - For Belgian orphans, £ 1 11 10s., for Belgian soldiers at the front, £ 1 5s. 11d.; for Belgians in the country occupied, £ 20 9s. 10d.

06 August 1916

[Sunday] Keswick and the district around presents some of the lively appearance it wears in peace time. The touring cars are conspicuous by their absence. Some lucky owners with a stock of petrol have been able to reach Keswick by road instead of by rail but they promptly put their cars up in garages and walk, or cycle, or coach. None but motorists complain of the change. There are only cyclists left to growl about the pot holes in the roads, but they are at least free from the dust nuisance and the highways on that account are again possible for the pedestrian. You might walk from Keswick around Bassenthwaite and not pass a single pleasure car. There is a little more movement on the road from Keswick to Windermere but even there the number of motors passing does not average more than one a mile.

07 August 1916

This week it was reported: ABBEY TOWN BROTHERS KILLED. Mr Walter Weightman, Abbey Town, has lost two sons. Luke was killed in the advance on July 1st and his brother James was killed in the trenches on the following day.

08 August 1916

FREARSON. - In affectionate and loving memory of our dear son Private Charles W Frearson, King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment (T.F.), who was killed in action on August 8th 1916. 'Ever fondly remembered by his parents and family, 5 James Watt Terrace, Barrow. [Barrow News 10.08.1918]

09 August 1916

Gunner Patrick Bernard Mulligan. R.F.A., youngest son of Mr Patrick Mulligan, Middlegate, Penrith who died from wounds in Fazakerley Hospital, Liverpool was buried at Penrith Cemetery today with full military honours. This being the first military funeral of a Penrith man since the outbreak of the war. The body had been in St. Catherine's Roman Catholic Church during the night and at 7:30 a Requiem Mass was said by Father Read, Newcastle. An escort of members of the National Reserve and the Westmorland and Cumberland Yeomanry accompanied the hearse to the cemetery and the cortege included members of the Volunteer Training Corps. A party of soldiers acted as bearers. Father Bremer, Carlisle, conducted the service and after three volleys had been fired Private J. Ruddick of the Yeomanry sounded the "Last Post." Those present included the Deputy Chairman and several of the members and officials of the Urban Council.

10 August 1916

WINDERMERE RUSSIAN RED CROSS DAY. Thursday, August 10th 1916. Novelties of the season. Caledonian Market or Country Fair, on Bowness promenade. Lounge and woodland café. Plenty of fun and merriment and side shows.

11 August 1916

The Wigton Advertiser stated under the headline Lads at the Front: Whilst there is at the present time wounded in hospital a Wigton soldier who is only three years off sixty, on the other hand our Roll of Honour contains the name of more than one Wigton boy who ardour for the fray led him to enlist before he was eighteen. Under the new regulation some of the boys under eighteen who were sent out to France are now returning. They have the opportunity if they desire, of coming back until they attain the age for admission into the Army. This is a young man's war, but it is not pleasant to contemplate that boys of sixteen or seventeen have to stand the hardships of the trenches or the awful conditions of modern warfare.

12 August 1916

Grouse Shooting. Today the Lowther Castle party opened the season by shooting over Ralfland Common, the smallest of Lord Lonsdale's Shap moors. Last year this moor had a very heavy stock but the 36 hours continuous heavy rainfall at the beginning of July did great damage; as a result the birds for the opening day were small and few, and under 80 brace were secured. The party included the Duke and Duchess of Beaufort, The Earl and Countess of Mar and Kellie and the honourable Lancelot Lowther.

13 August 1916

The Salvation Army held a memorial service this week for Lance Corporal Norman MacKenzie, a Citadel bandsman from Barrow. The son of William and Mary MacKenzie, Union Street, Barrow, he was killed in action with the 1st/4th Battalion King's Own on 03.08.1916. At the memorial service the Death March from Saul and My Guide, which was one of the bandsman's favourite, were played.

14 August 1916

Hazelbank Officers Hospital, Gosforth opens

15 August 1916

FERTILISERS v THE ARMY At Penrith Rural District Tribunal today Mr Joseph Harrison, a Farmer and Lime Quarry Proprietor, Newbiggin, Dacre, applied for A.E. Mounsey, Quarryman, and Joseph Bowes, Ploughman. He said he was short staffed at the lime works; the men worked at the farm as well as at the quarry. Owing to the scarcity of fertiliser, he thought it more important to keep the works going than to take the men into the Army. Major Smith for the Tribunal said "It was more important to win the war". Bowes had been going from place to place with the intention of avoiding military service. Mounsey was given to November 20th; Bowes was refused.

16 August 1916

Norman Park of the Pals, son of the late Mr T. and of Mrs Park, Wattsfield, Kendal, has been invalided home with fever and passed through Oxenholme on a hospital train today.

17 August 1916

Mrs Burnyeat, the German wife of late Mr. W.J.D. Burnyeat, formerly MP for Whitehaven. QUESTION TO THE HOME SECRETARY. In the House of Commons today Mr Hume Williams asked the Home Secretary whether he would state the circumstances which led to Mrs Burnyeat's internment: the name of the competent military authority who advised Mrs Burnyeat's release and on what grounds and at whose request this advice was tendered; and under what conditions Mrs Burnyeat was allowed to reside at Harrogate. Mr Samnel said that Mrs Burnyeat was released when her husband was gravely ill and after his death in view of her state of health it was decided to allow her to reside at Harrogate, subject to all the restrictions imposed upon enemy aliens in addition to restrictions to her movements and correspondence.

18 August 1916

YOUNG WIDOW'S SUICIDE. It was reported in this week's press that Police-constable Percival was called into a house in Caldecotes, Carlisle, where on arrival he found a woman named Hannah Cowan aged 25 years - a widow, suspended with a rope around her neck from the stair bannister. Artificial respiration was administered but upon the arrival of the doctor life was pronounced extinct. The circumstances surrounding the discovery are particularly painful. The deceased's husband it is understood, left home on the Sunday preceding the Jutland Naval battle during which he is stated to have gone down with H.M.S. Defence. The young mother leaves four children.

19 August 1916

At Burton-in-Lonsdale there are four families who among them have provided sixteen soldiers for the war.

20 August 1916

The presentation of certificates, medallions and labels gained by members of the nursing and ambulance sections of the Cockermouth Voluntary Aid Detachment took place recently. Mrs Dodgson, hon. Commandant of the nursing section, presided and called upon Mrs Green-Thompson, Bridekirk, to make the presentations.

21 August 1916

Many of the people of France and Flanders have become so familiar with the English language that they understand it better than the French Language as spoken by the English and in reference to this fact Lieutenant Hodgson of Netherwasdale tells a good story against himself. Having addressed an old Flemish woman in what he thought was her native lingo, she replied: "If you will sprechen Englees, monsieur, me will understand you better." On another occasion he asked in French, a French girl to direct him to some place he was going to. "Round that corner." She replied in English, "first turn to the right, then to the left."

22 August 1916

The seventh annual report of the directors of the Workington Iron and Steel Company, states that the profit on the year's working is £ 485,419, which with £ 22,644 brought forward from the previous year gives for disposal £ 508,063.  The entire plant has been placed at the disposal of the Government who had practically taken the whole output.

23 August 1916

Writing to the Wigton Advertiser one of the 5th Border in France described their doings when out of the firing line. 'One night we attended a 'cinema' as the Canadians call a picture palace, about two kilometres away, equal to one and a half English miles. We line up two deep outside the barn, hundreds of ours. It is the 'third house' and we are waiting our turn to get in when who should come strolling out but one well known in Wigton, Driver Joe Burney, who was with Mr John Kerr, Red Hall, and Mr Watson Lowfield House, and who once had the misfortune to break his ankle at Wigton Baths when wrestling. Joe says it doesn't matter where he goes, he always turn up somebody from the 'Pump'.

24 August 1916

Legal and official notices. The Carlisle New Brewery Company Ltd; as this company have now been acquired by the Central Control Board (Liquor Traffic) all persons having any claims or demands against them are requested to forward full particulars, and all persons indebted to the said company, are requested to pay the amount of their respective debts to me forthwith; Robert W. Slee, New Brewery, Carlisle.

25 August 1916

Westmorland County Council, Public Health and Housing Committee resolved that in as much as the Local Government Board have laid upon County and County Borough Councils the duty of treating all cases of contagious venereal disease, steps should be taken to ensure that all men who have contracted venereal disease while in the Army should not be discharged until they are no longer in a state of infection.

26 August 1916

The Carlisle Journal reported today that the normal population of Carlisle is about 55,000 but at the present moment there are at least 65,000 within its boundaries; and there is, of course, great overcrowding. There are no empty houses within the city, and when one becomes vacant there are 100s of applicants for it. Lodgings are difficult to obtain as houses; probably there is not a dweller in the artisan lower middle class quarters of the town, who has not been piteously appealed to by workers to let them in. The evil in this congestion is obvious: the remedy is equally obvious. More houses must be built. But they cannot be built; the government has stopped all Building.

27 August 1916

Today, Sunday, a service in memory of Privates George E McFall, Tom Robinson, John E Robinson, WT Grey, John Rowland Lightfoot, and John Lacey, who were killed on active service in France, was held in St Paul's Church, Frizington. There was a good congregation in addition to the relatives and friends of the departed soldiers. The Rev RSE Oliver preached 'They are all of them young, everyone of them doubtless with the young man's desire to live and enjoy life. They did not want to die. They loved life. They looked forward to a happy life here, and now they have departed, the saddest thought being their youth.'

28 August 1916

Today Belgian miner, Theophile Wustenberg, living in Northside, Workington, was killed by a rock fall at Lowca Pit.

29 August 1916

It was announced this week that Messers S.Redmayne & Sons Ltd of Wigton, Durafit Tailors, have secured the order of making the uniforms for the 1st Cumberland Volunteer Force. The uniforms will be regulation tunics and breeches, with puttys and caps. They will be in khaki colour, special permission having been granted for this.

30 August 1916

Many soldiers and sailors, men in the prime of life, have been suddenly struck blind by shot or shell and are condemned to live in darkness for the rest of their lives. They fought for us and our sakes they lost that which many consider dearer than life itself. These soldiers are being cared for at the Blinded Soldiers and Sailors Hostel, St Dunstan's, and here are 'learning to be blind'. To secure this a large sum of money is necessary, and it is hoped that this will be augmented by profits from the sale of 'Regimental Rings', which are engraved with the crests of any regiment in the Army, including Border, Lonsdales, Yeomanry, RFA etc. Price, gold shell 2s 6d, solid gold from 12s 6d, obtainable from Thorpe's Jeweller, West Tower Street, Carlisle.

31 August 1916

Workington National Shell Factory opens this month.

01 September 1916

The secretary of the Barrow Labour Party, Bram Longstaffe, faced charges of inciting a public disturbance. He had been agitating for better pay and lodgings on behalf of munitions girls brought into Barrow from Wigan to work at Vickers. He was found guilty and sentenced to one month's imprisonment with hard labour. Upon serving his sentence he was sent to a Welsh camp as a conscientious objector. There he refused to obey any orders he believed would aid the war effort and he was subsequently sentenced to two years imprisonment in Wakefield Prison.

02 September 1916

A picnic and sports to be held at Kingstown, Carlisle, today in a field close to the school. Proceeds in aid of the wounded soldiers and Kingstown boys at the front. The Chadwick Memorial School Band will be in attendance for dancing, when handsome prizes will be given for waltzing. Admission to the field 6d each, children under 14 1d. Come and support your Comrades at the Front.

03 September 1916

DISMISSED THE SERVICE will be the fate of your knife cleaner if you don't have BROWN'S STAINLESS KNIVES. Absolutely no cleaning; simply drying. They can't rust or stain. DESSERTS 10/6 per ½ doz. TABLES 12s per ½ doz. GEO BROWN & CO., 14 & 16 Devonshire Street. ESTABLISHED EARLY LAST CENTURY.

04 September 1916

This week the Westmorland Gazette commented, the search for shirkers is proceeding briskly in town as well as in country - in places as big as Leeds, Birmingham and Manchester, in places as nondescript as Carlisle and as inoffensive as Kendal. In some instances the police pursue their search by means of domiciliary visits. Elsewhere they raid boxing clubs, football grounds and cinemas, where suspected men are required to produce evidence of age and other particulars. At Carlisle on Saturday, for example, the round up led to the detention of "several hundreds" who, being without satisfactory papers, were conveyed to the Castle to await investigation. At Leeds between two and three hundred men were taken into custody for similar reasons. Most of them succeeded in satisfying the authorities that they had been temporarily exempted from military service. Those who were unable to do this were taken before magistrates, charged with failing to report themselves for service, fined and ordered to await escort. It is possible that some men who ought to be in the ranks will escape even this profound process of combing. But the fact that the combing has become profound is in itself proof that the need for men has not lessened, and that there is no intention at headquarters to let any of those who are liable get out of their liability by active cunning or passive neglect.

05 September 1916

A cigarette case which recently saved the life of Private David Martin, Aspatria, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, whilst in France, has been on view in Wigton in the window of Mr McMechan, bookseller. The bullet is still embedded in the case.

06 September 1916

The boys of St. Bees School have had two days added to their summer holiday at the request of Lieutenant Robinson. V.C., who was for five years at the school before proceeding to Sandhurst.

07 September 1916

BELGIAN MINER FINED FOR ASSAULT. At Whitehaven on Thursday, Louis Laermaus was fined 10s… or a month's imprisonment for assaulting Ernest Deintte. The men are both Belgian coalminers and the allegation was that defendant went into the complainants house at Alabaster Cottages and struck him on the neck with his fist and that when complainant put up his hand to protect himself he was cut with a knife. The defence was a complete denial of the charge.

08 September 1916

CAKES FOR SOLDIER FRIENDS. Men at the front often write that a good home-made cake is the gladdest gift they can get. It makes up for lack of variety in army fare. How to send cakes. To send a cake, get an old tin box for it - an old biscuit box for instance. Wrap the box in brown paper, and address it (of course in ink) exactly as you address a letter. Write on the brown paper, not on a tied-label. Post it to France - up to 3lb, 1/- ;What cakes to send. Cakes for the Front should be light, yet keep well.

09 September 1916

ANTI-ZEPPELEIN SHADES. Get one at Brown's Iron Mongers 14 -16 Devonshire Street, Carlisle. Cheaper than blinds, 1 shilling each.

10 September 1916

Baptised at Ivegill this day William Charles French, son of Richard and Margaret Steele, of Rigg Cottage.

11 September 1916

This week it was reported that Mrs Lloyd Rayner, of Kentmere, has left with her motor car for France, having joined the French Red Cross and will be attached to a hospital in France. Her son, Gilbert Rayner, Royal Engineers, who was wounded in France in May, is convalescent and has returned to duty.

12 September 1916

This week it was reported that a self-propelled chair provided by subscribers and workers of the Cartmel War Working Party has been sent to the second Western General Hospital, Manchester.

13 September 1916

Rev. Hodgson, Wasdale Vicarage, wrote a letter to the Carlisle Journal concerning women in the National Mission. He wrote "The approaching grant of the Parliamentary franchise to women shows the spirit of the time and renders it impossible to exclude them from wider activities in the Church. At least, it would be a misfortune is able women should be driven to devote themselves to politics because the Church does not afford them a sufficient field for their spiritual energies. The Church will have need of all its resources in the constructive years after the war, and one of its richest resources is in its women." 

14 September 1916

This week Mr and Mrs Cowley, 39 Market Street, Dalton received a note from the Infantry Record Office to the effect that their son, 15918 Private James Cowley, 1st Battalion Middlesex Regiment had been missing since an engagement on August 18th [See September 15th].

15 September 1916

Mr and Mrs Cowley, 39 Market Street, Dalton received two letters today from their son, Private James Cowley, 1st Battalion Middlesex Regiment, posted in France on September 10th. Earlier in the week they had received official notification that he was reported missing in action since August 18th.

16 September 1916

A Flag Day on behalf of the Belgian Soldiers' Fund and the fund for the relief of distress in Belgium was observed on Saturday in Grange. A number of flag sellers were early astir and in the afternoon the Belgian band from Millom paraded the streets and the parade was followed by a gymnastic display by a troupe of Belgian performers. As a result of the effort over £ 30 was raised for the Belgian funds.

17 September 1916

Writing to a friend in Brampton today, Sergeant Henry Scott Riddell of the Mounted Military Police said "Get as many bets on as you can that the war will be over before Christmas. The hands of the clock are pointing to a beaten and demoralised army. We keep the flag flying that they can't pull down. What a day it will be when the boys come home. I am myself in the pink."

18 September 1916

Today at a meeting of Coniston school managers, Cannon Hemming expressed the pride of the managers at the efforts of the working party of school girls who by two efforts had been able to send about 12 guineas to the local Prisoner of War Committee. It was splendid to know the girls had thought of the suffering of our prisoners. Truly they were fulfilling the Scriptures admonition "Bear ye one another's' burdens.

19 September 1916

Sergeant J.T. Barton of Holme, who was reported missing in last week's Westmorland Gazette enlisted in January 1915, in the Irish King's Liverpool Regiment. He is officially reported as missing from August 8th. His wife, who lives at Primrose Bank, Holme, received a letter from him dated August 7th, in which he stated that he had been fighting during the advance from July 1st, and he was going into action the same night again, so that before morning it would be death or glory for them. He had up to then 15 months fighting, without a scratch. The official report says it is quite possible that Sergeant Barton has been taken prisoner. Mrs Barton would be grateful for any news of her husband.

20 September 1916

A women's Pilgrimage of Prayer through the two counties commenced at Armathwaite today. The following circular was issued to the villagers "A few women with the permission of the Bishop of the Diocese and your Vicar are coming to your Parish on a Pilgrimage of Prayer. This means by that Prayer and short talks we shall try and learn together more about the Saviour. We need to do so at this time of national anxiety and danger. The Pilgrims will ask for humble lodgings for two nights. They ask that they may be invited to the very simplest meals in the cottages". The Pilgrims will, on leaving Armathwaite, visit Lazonby, Addingham, Little Salkeld, Hesket, Calthwaite, Southwaite, Aiket Gate, Ivegill, Raughton Head, Sebergham, Wreay and other parts of the two counties.

21 September 1916

Yesterday being 'Jack Cornwell's Day' £ 1.6s 8d was collected from the children and teachers in aid of wounded soldiers and mariners [Burgh by Sands School Log Book, head Mr William H.Bell. Jack Cornwell, aged 16, was killed at the Battle of Jutland. He was awarded the Victoria Cross].

22 September 1916

This week a number of postcards have been received from soldiers in Egypt thanking the children of the Finsthwaite School for gifts. One of them contains an admirably executed sketch in colour of a soldier with a lighted cigar (one of the gifts) in his mouth standing tip-toe on the top of a Pyramid, with the words "See how tall they make you feel" written underneath.

23 September 1916

Holidays at Messrs Vickers, Barrow, Naval Construction Works. The Ministry of Munitions and the Admiralty have approved of these works closing from 12 noon on Saturday September 23rd, until Monday October 2nd at 6 am. Workpeople are requested not to absent themselves prior to the commencement of the holiday period, and also to make prompt resumption after the works re-open. Anyone requested to work during the holiday period will be expected to do so, for which extra payment will be made in accordance with the holiday arrangements.

24 September 1916

ROYAL NAVAL AIR SERVICE R.N. Seaplane Station, HILLS OF OAKS, WINDERMERE. The Men of this Station appeal to any kind lady or gentleman for the Loan or Gift of a Billiard Table, or any Musical Instrument, or Literature for their use during the winter months. Communications should be addressed to H. Moore, L.M.

25 September 1916

This week's Wigton Advertiser contained a detailed description of the British Armies new trench helmets. It said it will surprise most people to learn that there are no fewer than 64 distinct operations necessary in turning out one of the plain steel helmets worn by all French soldiers and by many of the British Troops. The first step is stamping out discs from large sheets of steel. A special machine is used for this purpose, exerting a pressure of 150 tonnes and capable of cutting out 5,000 steel discs a day. Each disc is placed under a shaping machine, which presses the discs into the form of a helmet with a broad rim. Polishing and cutting machines remove all irregularities in the helmet, after which it has holes punched in the crown, some for ventilation purposes, and others for fastening on the regimental crest. Each helmet is cleaned and dipped in a special mixture, which makes it a dull, inconspicuous blueish grey. A lining and leather chin strap are then fastened on, and the helmet is complete. Since the French Army has been protected with the helmets, the number of deaths due to wounds in the head has decreased to a remarkable extent.

26 September 1916

Special Designs for Funeral Cards for Soldiers. "Gazette" Office, Kendal.

27 September 1916

This week Mr Collins, at a Cockermouth Urban Council meeting, stated, that about a thousand men had been called away from the town by the War.

28 September 1916

At Ulverston Police Court, on Thursday, thirty-five persons were summoned for failing to put up lists of persons of military age engaged on their premises. They included Mr F.W. Poole, solicitor and the Ulverston Urban Council, Wm. Postlethwaite, Hawkswell Farm, Lowick and Thomas Brown, Keldray Farm, Lowick. The Chairman (Col. Baldwin) said all the cases would be dismissed on payment of costs, it being pointed out in some instances that forms could not be obtained at the post-offices. If, however, people did not conform to the regulations by posting up the notices they would in future be more seriously dealt with.

29 September 1916

CARRS have just introduced "JUTLAND" a new biscuit, rich and very appetising. Per 1/- pound of about 24 biscuits. CARR & Co., Carlisle.

30 September 1916

Writing this week to his brother in law, Private Harry Dunn, of Maryport, who is in the Border Regiment, states that he is in the trenches once again. He continues 'I lost my mate last week. He was killed by a piece of shell. Billy Kelly (also from Maryport), they called him. I helped to bury him well behind the firing line. We all do the very best for our fallen heroes. Our artillery is giving them beans as I write'.

01 October 1916

Baptised this day at St Andrews Church, Penrith, Frederick William Kitchener, son of Frederick [3rd Border Regiment, formerly farm servant] and Annie Thompson.

02 October 1916

Ten thousand Gretna Munition workers commenced four days holiday today. Special trains will run to London, the South, Wales, and the Midlands, and back for the men whose homes are in those parts.

03 October 1916

The Rev JH Eastwood, pastor of the Penrith Presbyterian Church, announced to his congregation this week that he had been invited to go to France to minister to the troops under the auspices of the YMCA. He would during this week consult his church workers to take counsel as to whether it would be desirable for him to accept the invitation.

04 October 1916

West Cumberland Times. LOST War Services Badge 90537 between Mealsgate and Egremont, September 23rd. Finder return to Tuer, Wagoner, Bolton How, Holmrook. LOST, Top Set FALSE TEETH between Maryport and Ellenborough. Return to S.Burnett, 170 Main Street, Ellenborough. Finder will be rewarded.

05 October 1916

One effect of the war, consequent upon the cutting-off of German imports, is the exploitation of the minerals of the Caldbeck Fells. A Birmingham mining and mineral agent who has acquired an option of the mineral rights of Lord Leconfield over an area of 24 square miles has opened out the barytes mine at Pottsgill. The demand for barytes [used in manufacturing paint, tanning leather, stiffening fustians and corduroys amongst other things] before the war was almost entirely supplied by German manufacturers.

06 October 1916

Private Dick Prickett, of Hincaster Hall,  wrote to his sister today - 'I am still kicking around, but have not had much time to write since coming here in the Somme push. Two days ago I was up in a village or on the mounds of earth and brick that had once been a village when we took it from Fritz. All at once I heard the familiar dialect, and a voice called out, 'Coom on and join the company man'. I went over to the dugout from which the sound came and found there some of the Border Regiment, so I shouted 'How's Kendal?' You should have seen them stare and after that I had quite a long chat with some of the chaps. One boy from Milnthorpe, who used to drive Dr Fuller's motor-car,  named  Wilson, told me that he was one of six who were left out of thirty-six who enlisted at Milnthorpe with him.'

07 October 1916

It was reported that Lord and Lady Lowther are passing the Autumn at Lowther Castle, and will spend the hunting season at Barleythorpe Hall, near Oakham. Lord Lonsdale has generously undertaken to hunt the Cottesmore country at his own expense until peace is restored.

08 October 1916

Private J Barry, Border Regiment, Newtown, Whitehaven, was killed in action today. His widow has lost two husbands in the war; her previous husband, Private Matthew Wilson, being killed nineteen months ago.

09 October 1916

This morning Mr Wilson Franks, of Oakbank, Whitehaven, received a wire stating his son, Lieut JN Franks, of the Border Regiment, was in hospital in Manchester. Lieut Franks, it appears, is suffering from injury to the back and extensive bruising caused by a bursting shell. He had a very narrow escape from death. He was rendered unconscious and upon removal to hospital it was found that the muscles of the back had been damaged, and he was bruised all over the body.

10 October 1916

The Whitehaven Soldiers' Memorial Committee resolved this day to pass for payment £ 23 for watches presented to Corporal Ewing DCM and Corporal McGlennon DCM.

11 October 1916

A large number of cases were heard at the County Appeals Tribunal held at the Courts, Carlisle, today. Alexander Knight, district agent for the Pearl Insurance Society, appealed for Thomas Robinson, insurance agent, Greystsone Road, Carlisle. Robinson was 33 years of age and married. Mr Knight urged that he was indispensable to him in the carrying on of the work, and that the appeal was a personal one by him. If Robinson, who was passed for garrison work abroad, was taken it would take four women to do his work. He (Mr Knight) had tried five women, and they could not stand the wear and tear of the work. He had three sons in the Army, and had encouraged his men to join the Army. He honestly felt he could not carry on without Robinson. The appeal was dismissed but the Military Representative agreed not to call Robinson up before 31st December.

12 October 1916

The below poem from Sergt T Thomlinson, 17th Lancers, appeared in this week's West Cumberland Times:

Sad wives and mothers, you have our pity, How for you we oft do pray Through the long dark nights we ponder Until comes the break of day.

We are here to fight for Homeland
For our children o'er the foam:
God guard us through this awful turmoil
Until homewards we may roam

Duty keeps us out in Flanders
Battling at the foeman's trench
Till the final day of fighting -
Victory we shall from him wrench.

13 October 1916

It was announced that Second Lieut. Francis Richard Lowry Bell, Border Regiment, killed at Albert, February 23rd has left an estate valued at 2,514 pounds.

14 October 1916

A Battle Field Scene. A correspondent in the local press wrote that after being wounded, "Made back over the shell-swept area, shells and bullets flying in all directions, to the dressing station. In my travels back from shell-hole to shell-hole, in one of these I saw two wounded soldiers, one an English Tommy, the other a German, both having a drink of water out of the same bottle, in quite a friendly way, whilst only a few hours before they would be bitter enemies. This is only one of the many instances I could relate."

15 October 1916

In a post-card to his mother in Kendal Lance-Corporal Hugh Park, of the Border Regiment who was taken prisoner at Kut, says they have had neither tea nor coffee since last Christmas, and the food is scarce and bad.

16 October 1916

At a public meeting in Dent tonight, Mr W Burton presiding, it was decided to appoint a committee for war savings, with J E Goad hon. secretary, and to take the necessary steps to promote this object in the dale.

17 October 1916

Wedding at Staveley today. Corporal Edwin Brockbank, Royal Engineers, married Alice Wilhelmina Crofts. The bride wore a brown silk dress trimmed with crepe de chine fichu. Her hat was of brown velour trimmed with autumn tints. She wore racoon fur and a gold wristlet watch, gifts of the bridegroom. The bridegroom is at present home on sick leave, after being on the Somme. The bride has been nursing wounded soldiers during the last two years.

18 October 1916

Royal Navy Submarine HMS K8 launched at Barrow. Royal Navy [Scrapped 1923].

19 October 1916

The Carlisle Watch Committee has received a letter from the Manager of the City of Carlisle Electric Tramway Company Limited, intimating that owing to the difficulty in obtaining men to drive the tramcars, the company were obliged to curtail the service, and enquiring whether the Watch Committee would be prepared to licence females as tram drivers. The Watch Committee resolved that they did not see their way to entertain the suggestion.

20 October 1916

REDMAN. In loving memory of Sergeant Major FA Redman, Hampsfield, King's Own, who died of wounds on October 20th 1916.
I do not forget him, nor do I intend
I think of him daily, and will to the end I miss him and mourn him in silence unseen And dwell on the memory of days that have been From his pal George in France [Barrow News 26.10.1918]

21 October 1916

Lance-Corpl. Teddy O'Neil, a Wigtonian, in a letter to a relative, writes: "The old Company have been doing some dirty work lately. We had all waited a long while to do the leepover the top: well, we got the chance and took it. Every man was in his glory when the order came and when we got in among the Huns we didn't forget to give them what for. In our last charge we got well away and caught the enemy napping, so you will have an idea what we were all like. I accounted for a few and no mistake about it. We took a few prisoners.'

22 October 1916

A special service for doctors, nurses and members of the Red Cross Voluntary Aid Detachment of the City and the County was held in Carlisle Cathedral today, and was largely attended. A number of wounded soldiers from local hospitals were also invited. The Dean of Salisbury preached. His sermon was a call for deeper religious devotion.

23 October 1916

Gunner W Cowman, of the Canadians, whose relatives live in the Workington district, is in hospital suffering from shell shock.

24 October 1916

MOSS, Pte. Tom A.S.C. (Motor Transport), 15 Gandy Street, Kendal, is in hospital in West Africa, suffering from malaria fever. When in Kendal he was employed by a local grocery firm as a motor delivery van driver.

25 October 1916

SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' COMFORTS. We hold a large stock of KNITTING WOOLS in Khaki and other suitable shades for knitting useful Articles for our brave Soldiers and Sailors. Hosiery and Woollen Goods in great variety. ROBINSON'S Hosiery Stores, Kendal.

26 October 1916

North Lonsdale Education Committee met at Ulverston this evening. It was decided that while Mr George C Farrer, the school attendance officer for the Greenodd and Haverthwaite district, was on military duty, his father Mr John Farrer, undertake the duties.

27 October 1916

Carlisle Education Committee resolved that the Brook Street and Newtown Schools should be placed at the disposal of the Army Council for use as military hospitals, subject to the Army Council defraying any expenses incurred by the Committee in providing temporary school accommodation.

28 October 1916

The Carlisle Journal Plum Puddings for Soldiers Fund continues to make steady and satisfactory progress.  Even the poorest, therefore, by sending sixpence to the Fund can have the satisfaction of feeling that he is treating one of the boys at the front to a good, substantial helping of Christmas pudding. Contracts have been already made, and it might almost be said that some of the puddings destined for the distant posts of Mesopotamia or East Africa are already on their way.

29 October 1916

This afternoon a memorial service was held in Cowgill Parish Church for men from Howgill who have fallen in the war: Private James Mason, Private Miles Capsticks, Private Henry Wilson, and Second Lieut. Oswald Whaley, son of the late Vicar of Howgill. There was a large congregation. The service consisted of part of the ordinary evening service, part of the burial service, special prayers and sermon, which the vicar ended by saying that "Whilst we all sympathise with those who have lost their dear ones, we are all proud of our heroes." At the close of the service the organist played the death march.

30 October 1916

MEN DISCHARGED from the Army disabled etc REQUIRING EMPLOYMENT should apply to RECRUITING OFFICER 34th R.D.R.A. THE CASTLE, CARLISLE, stating kind of work.

31 October 1916

The 'DREADNOUGHT PILL' is Duncan's Sure Cure Kidney and Liver Pill. A beautifully balanced compound of Liver Invigorators and antiseptic duretics and solvents, forming an effective remedy for all Liver and Kidney complaints, including backache, Lumbago, Gravel, Irregular Periods, and all female complaints. In boxes,  2s 9d size 2s 3d; 6 boxes for 12 s. John Hunter, Chemist (Medallist), 17 and 19 Bank Street, Carlisle.

01 November 1916

A concert party held at Cartmel this week to provide Christmas parcels for locals boys at the Front, produced about £ 8.

02 November 1916

Thirty-five wounded soldiers arrived at the Kendal V. A. D. this evening.

03 November 1916

John Hall, farmer of Rosley notes in his diary today: The Great War still continues and no signs of an end, they are still wanting more and more men.

04 November 1916

It was reported that Lieutenant William Ranger, master at Millom Secondary School, has arrived home at Dalton in Furness, after having been seriously wounded in the leg.

05 November 1916

Lieutenant WS Glegg, King's Own Rifles, whose death is reported, was one of the best all around athletes St Bees Grammar School has produced. He was killed on his way to the dressing station after he had been wounded. He was nineteen and was the third son of the late Mr AT Glegg, Sheriff - Substitute of Lanarkshire. His brother, Captain AL Glegg, was killed in action last year.

06 November 1916

Private Joseph Harker, late of the Border Regiment, and Miss Florence Hewson of Hove have married. Private Harker is a native of Blennerhasset, and at the age of 21 was totally blinded, his left arm was shattered, and his life endangered by poison gas. Miss Hewson visited the Convalescent Hostel at Brighton for the purpose of taking the blind soldiers out, and the bride and groom thus met about a year ago. The wedding was attended by several blind soldiers from the Home and many people who were keenly interested in the unusual ceremony.

07 November 1916

Ellen Routledge, munition worker, was charged with stealing a stick of cordite, value 1s, on November 7th. It was stated that Ellen Routledge was being searched on leaving the Gretna munitions work when a piece of cordite was found hidden in the top of her stocking by one of the women policewomen. In the ensuing court case the prosecutor said that it was very undesirable that an article made by secret process should be taken from the compound and it may possibly get into the hands of the enemy.

08 November 1916

The current issue of the Westmorland Gazette carries the following plea MISSING. Atkinson, Pte H, King's Own Y.L.I., has been missing since July 1st. His mother would be pleased to hear any news of him.

09 November 1916

A poem by Private Little of the Border Regiment appeared in the local press.
MY STEEL HAT
On the March
It on my forehead heavy lies,
It brings the tears into my eyes,
It fetches from me groans and sighs -
                        My Tin Hat
In Camp
It forms for me a comfy seat,
It makes for me a wash bowl neat,
It holds my rations just a treat -
                        My Tin Hat
In the Trenches
It guards the splinters from my head,
Full many a knock it takes instead,
A goodly halo round my spread
                        My Tin Hat
So I will praise thee as I should,
For thou my friend has often stood,
Thou art a comrade staunch and good -
                        My Tin Hat

10 November 1916

Gilcrux, a supper and dance will be held in the schoolroom, Gilcrux this evening. Admission, Ladies: 1s 6d, Gentleman: 2 shillings (including knife and fork supper). Dancing to commence at 8pm. Proceeds in aid of the Local Soldiers.

11 November 1916

ABOVE-DERWENT NEWSLETTER Martinmas 1916 The necessity of postponing pleasure and unnecessary expenditure until after the War, was forcibly brought home to us all the other day by a Lecturer, sent down specially for the purpose, by the War Savings Association. Mrs. Richardson, the lecturer, convinced us of the absolute necessity to husband our resources, and put all our savings into Government Loans, so that our country may be enabled to keep up a lively fire of shot and shell into enemy lines.

12 November 1916

This week it was said that 2,000 men are serving with the Army from Kendal. It has been decided to send each man a Christmas parcel and it is estimated that close to £ 300 will be required for this purpose.

13 November 1916

Since last May the Patriotic Working Party for Low Bentham have knitted and made 124 articles, including 86 pairs of socks, which have been  distributed. Each local man who has recently joined the colours has had a parcel of comforts given him. Many letters have been received from the boys appreciating the comforts.

14 November 1916

The local newspaper reported "The facts are as simple as they are tragic. The losses reported in the British Army from the beginning of July until the end of October - four months - numbered 21,538 officers and 391,218 men; that is a total considerably more than 400,000, or an average of 100,000 a month. Those losses must steadily and promptly be made good… We must either find the men to keep up their effective strength, or say that we are not able to do it - it could be shameful as well as false."

15 November 1916

At this week's Wigton Military tribunal, Arthur W. Jennings, appeared on behalf of John Barker. He said, Mr Barker, aged 36, was married, and had six children. Mr Lancaster for the tribunal said 'That's enough. Conditional discharge granted'.

16 November 1916

At today's Workington Military tribunal a produce merchant and proprietor applied for the exemption for a foreman horseman, aged 36, married, who after been twice medically rejected, had eventually been passed for B1 - Garrison duty abroad. Applicants stated that the man had a bad knee and a bad shoulder, and could not get up when he sat down. The application for exemption was refused.

17 November 1916

John Baxter, munition worker, Close Street, Carlisle, was charged at Longtown Police Court with smoking within a prohibited area [Gretna Munitions works] on November 17th.

18 November 1916

Royal Navy Submarine HMS K3 launched at Barrow.  [Scrapped 1926].

19 November 1916

Private Page, of the Middlesex Regiment, died today at the Stramongate VAD Hospital, Kendal. He belonged to London and came to Kendal with the last convoy but one, being grievously wounded. His funeral will take place at the Cemetery on Wednesday 22nd. The farewell volley will be discharged over the grave by a firing party from Barrow and a bugler will play the 'Last Post'.

20 November 1916

The Palace Cinema, Aspatria, 'The Battle of the Somme'. Don't fail to see this great picture.

21 November 1916

Miss Lilian Hall, of Keswick was amongst survivors when HM hospital ship Britannic was sunk in the Aegean by U73 today. There were78 casualties but nurse Hall survived. There were no wounded aboard the ship The Britannic the local papers afterwards noted was the sister ship of the Titanic.

22 November 1916

At the meeting held in Kendal Town Hall it was decided that instead of the usual Christmas parcel, a sum of money and a Christmas card conveying the best wishes from all in Kendal should be sent to each Kendal soldier serving in HM forces.

23 November 1916

RED CROSS WORKERS And Their Requirements. The one great essential in all Red Cross requisites, such as Nurses' Aprons and Dress Ginghams, is quality. Nothing but the best is good enough to withstand the heavy strain of constant washing, and by 'the best' we do not mean the most expensive. We have ample stocks of Aprons, Sleeves, Collars, Belts and Dress Materials and can supply EVERYTHING FOR THE HOSPITAL NURSE. W Wright and Son, Highmore House, Carlisle.

24 November 1916

Mrs Howitt absent, received news of the death of a brother, killed in France. Note from Botcherby [Carlisle] school log book.

25 November 1916

Cruiser HMS Cassandra launched at Barrow. Royal Navy [Sunk 1918].

26 November 1916

This evening an impressive service was held in St. Pauls Church, Seaton, in memory of William Thompson, AB, RND., who was killed in action in France on November 7th. During the service, the organist played 'Blessed are the departed' and as a recessional 'O Rest in the Lord'. Reverend Bennett officiated, and preached a touching sermon.

27 November 1916

This evening at 8pm WOMEN WORKERS for WAR WORK. All unoccupied women are invited to attend a Women's Meeting to be held at the Queen's Hall, Carlisle. An appeal will be made for WOMEN WORKERS for MUNITIONS, and full information given as to the nature and conditions of the work open to them. Chairman - HIS WORSHIP THE MAYOR.

28 November 1916

According to a notice from the competent military authority, produced at the meeting of the Kendal Board of Guardians this evening, it is not permissible now to ring the big bell at the workhouse during the hours of darkness, lest it should be heard on board a Zeppelin.

29 November 1916

There were complaints about the quality of the beer sold in Carlisle, and the General Manager responded that since the Government Board had taken possession of the breweries the beer manufactured had been exactly the same in strength and quality as that which was brewed before the Board came to Carlisle.

30 November 1916

John Hall, farmer of Rosley notes in his diary today: "The Germans have sunk a big lot of our ships and things get dearer and dearer."

01 December 1916

Private Christmas Cards. Suitable Messages to Cheer the Boys. Series includes the Regimental Crests of all the best known Regiments. Brash Brothers Ltd, Station Street, Cockermouth.

02 December 1916

A few weeks ago Miss D Atkinson, Musgrave Street, Penrith, made some stockings and other articles for the soldiers and put her name and address on them. They were sent to France along with many thousands of other packages from all parts of the kingdom, but a curious chance caused them to be given in the trenches to a young soldier of the same name as the donor, and before the war living within a minute's walk of her house. The lucky man was Private A.Atkinson, York Street .

03 December 1916

Lost today between Ellenborough, Maryport and Station, LOCKET, containing photo., late brother (soldier) - Finder rewarded, returning Udall's, Crown Inn, Maryport.

04 December 1916

Keswick lads reported missing; the greatest anxiety is felt in Keswick since the weekend, when reports were going that several lads were missing. Mrs Towers, of Heads Lane, has had a postcard from Corporal Gibson telling her that her son, Private Morris Towers, Border Regiment, is missing. After an attack, when the roll was called, he failed to answer, and though enquiries have been made, he has still not been discovered. Sergeant Usher, of the same regiment, is also reported missing, and his family have not been able to get any reliable news up to the present. Private Welsh is also reported missing. Official information has been eagerly looked for.

05 December 1916

NOTICE. The sending of the 'Journal' to Neutral Countries. The 'Carlisle Journal' holds the permit of the War Office to transmit newspapers to all neutral countries; also to Prisoners of War interned in enemy countries. The 'Journal' will be dispatched to anyone in a neutral country on payment of 2/6 per quarter for Friday's 'Journal', or 5/- per quarter for Tuesday's and Friday's 'Journal'. To Prisoners of War the charge will be 1/3 per quarter  for Friday's 'Journal' and 2/6 per quarter for Tuesday's and Friday's 'Journal'

06 December 1916

At the Shap Military Tribunal this week, Mr Douthwaite presiding. A farmer and coal dealer aged 31, repeated his application for exemption. He said his brother was inexperienced, and his father was not strong enough to do outside work in bad weather. Mr Slack said it was not in the national interest that applicant should remain in civil life. Claims for financial loss were being dealt with most generously. Given till June 5th.

07 December 1916

Official notification from the War Office has been received by Mrs Timmins, Main Street, Distington, that her husband, Private Morrison Timmins, Border Regiment, who has been missing since July 1st 1916, died on that date. Private Timmins joined the Army about eighteen months ago, and had been in France about 9 months. He is the son of Mr Jacob Timmins, fruiterer, Distington. Before enlisting he was employed at Otlands Colliery as a collier. He leaves a widow and four children to mourn his loss.

08 December 1916

At the Wigton County Tribunal today forty cases were down for hearing. The cases related mostly to agriculturalists, and in one instance it was stated that if a man was taken the appellant could not plough his lea. That appeal was dismissed. Apparently the most important man before the court was not a cultivator of the soil, but a molecatcher. It was said that it had taken him twenty years to get the land clean, and he was a most useful man. The military appeal against exemption was dismissed.

09 December 1916

Richard Schwabe of Lowry Hill, Carlisle, advertises in the newspaper that he has legally changed his name to Richard Sinclair.

10 December 1916

The 'Chemico' Fabric Body Shield. Non Metallic, Fully Antiseptic.  If you have a soldier fighting in France this is most important to you. Bayonet thrusts; no bayonet, lance or sword can penetrate the protective material. Points of Superiority. It stops the bullet, metal shields merely deflect them. Single shield (Two and a half pounds weight) £ 1.7s 6d. At Anderson's. 121 Stricklandgate, Kendal.

11 December 1916

Writing to Mrs Jones, infirmary Road, Workington, Lieutenant Hamilton said 'I regret I am unable to give you any information concerning your son, RH Jones. In an attack on October 8th, a number of our boys were cut off; some of them may have been taken prisoner. The boys said he was wounded, but I couldn't find anyone who saw him after he was wounded. He was very popular amongst the boys of the Company, and he was a good soldier'.

12 December 1916

Two very successful concerts were held in Kendal Town Hall by a distinguished party of Belgian artistes in aid of the British Society for the relief of Belgian wounded soldiers.

13 December 1916

A Roll of Honour, presented to the villagers of Torpenhow by Lady Gillford, was dedicated in the village near the Post Office this week. The service was conducted by the Vicar. The memorial consists of a shrine with a movable front, containing the Roll of Honour, and fitted with vases intended to hold flowers, and it is anticipated that the friends of men at the front will keep the vases filled. The names on the Roll have been inscribed in Old English letters by Mr Dewar, headmaster of Bothel School.

14 December 1916

At the Ulverston Rural District Council meeting today, Councillor WR Nash presided. In regard to the call for the services of roadmen behind the lines in France, Coun. Altham moved 'that the services of any man between the ages of 41 and 50 employed on the highways who without satisfactory reason refuses to respond to the call for men to form the brigade for the repair of the roads behind the British lines in France be terminated, and for such purposes the Finance Committee be the tribunal to hear appeals'. After discussion this was defeated by eight votes to three. Altham moved another amendment that in the case of roadmen who failed to volunteer for service in France the war bonus be withdrawn. What did the council care about its roads in view of the requirements of the forces? Coun. Wilson Butler said this was still a free country. This amendment was defeated by six votes to four.

15 December 1916

Xmas presents. The men on active service will have first place in our thoughts this Christmas. WATERPROOF KHAKI AIR PILLOWS and case 4s 6d and 5s 3d each. Measures open 15x12 or 18X13 and folded 4x5 inches. RH Barker and Co, Chemists, Windermere.

16 December 1916

OFFICERS ON ACTIVE SERVICE. Your Burberry cleaned and proofed, FREE. Lucas and Cussons, Lowther Street, Whitehaven.

17 December 1916

This week it was reported that the body of Sergeant Harry Newman, lately in the service of Mr Tweddle, Devonshire Street, Carlisle, has been found on the ground on which he fell on July 1st. Writing to Miss Newman, the Rev AJW Crosse says:
'I have at last been able to come back to the place where our lads fell on July 1st.  It is still shelled almost everyday by the Germans but I have been able to find many bodies and bury them. Among them is your dear brother. I laid him out to rest in a special cemetery which I am making on the spot where the great action took place. On one side of him lies Sergeant-Major Payne and on the other Corporal G Fawkes. Twenty soldiers were present at the funeral service. I shall not leave the place until I have made 'The -----------Cemetery' one of the best in this land. I am sending with this letter a few cards and photographs from his pockets'.

18 December 1916

GRASP YOUR CHANCES GIRLS! Become short-hand typists and book-keepers. Look ahead and learn  ESPERANTO - the easy Universal Language. No commercial correspondent will be equipped without it after the war. Write or call for terms and list of good appointments recently secured by my pupils. HB Moore, FIPS, 21 Gray Street, Workington.

19 December 1916

The sister of Private W Hogarth, Border Regiment, a Keswick man, has had a letter from the Chaplain of the battalion, who says:
'I have just found the body of your brother, and have buried him with all honours, among many of his comrades in a cemetery which I have made on the spot where our brave lads fell. It will be called the Lonsdale Cemetery. His last resting place will be lovingly cared for. We cannot do too much for the brave lads who have died for us'.

20 December 1916

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR of the West Cumberland Times. Soldiers' Letters. Dear Sir, much uncertainty seems to prevail in our neighbourhood, re delivery of soldier' letters now in the Balkans, especially the lads of the Westmorland and Cumberland Yeomanry, who left here about three months ago. I have a son amongst them, and although letters have been sent to him every week up until now, he has not received any. There are others I find similarly situated, and knowing that there were Cockermouth lads amongst them, I would be obliged if any of your readers could give me any information. Considerable anxiety is now being felt at the fate of their Christmas parcels. Yours faithfully. JAMES ELLWOOD, School House, Reagill, Shap. Dec 20th 1916.

21 December 1916

The Cummersdale school children had their usual Christmas tea today. The children unanimously decided to forego the presents which Mr and Mrs Stead usually gave them and to give the money which the presents would have cost to St Dunstan's Hostel for Blinded Soldiers and Sailors. This money has been sent to the Treasurer of the Hostel by Mr Ridley, the schoolmaster, as a donation from the Cummersdale school children.

 

22 December 1916

At the recent meeting of the Wigton Board of Guardians Mr Strong drew attention to the case of a man named James Donoghue who had contracted consumption in the trenches, has been discharged from the Army, and was now in the Workhouse. He said it was a great shame, but agreed that it was probably the best place for him at present. The man had a wife and three children, and if some kind friends had not come in at the right time they would have been left to starve. The man had only got a pension of 4s 8d a week from the State, and this had been stopped when he came to Wigton about five weeks ago. If these people had to be looked on in this way it was a great slur on the State to allow them to drift into the Workhouse.  The man had been badly gassed at Armentieres. He had a brother killed at Loos, another badly wounded and discharged, another had lost a leg, and still another was in France.

23 December 1916

Bombardier John McKenzie of Longtown was buried in Arthuret Church, Longtown, today with military honours. He was severely wounded on the Somme a short time ago and died in Frensham Military Hospital, Surrey, last Monday. Much sympathy is extended to his parents Mr and Mrs McKenzie in their sad bereavement, as Bombardier McKenzie was the last survivor of their three sons who have laid down their lives in the present war. Their youngest son, Malcolm, of the RFA was wounded in July 1915 and died at the Base Hospital, Boulogne. William the eldest was killed in action with the Border Regiment on July 5th this year.

24 December 1916

A service today was held at Arlecdon Church in memory of Private Albert Bland of Winder. The Rev HH Parker, in his sermon, said that Private Bland was wounded in July. Since then he had lingered between life and death, and early last week the end came.  On Friday his remains were interred in their churchyard. It was within recent years that both his parents had died whilst comparatively young, and Albert bravely undertook to keep the home together, but his self-sacrificing bravery led him to offer his service to his King and Country.

25 December 1916

The 21 patients at the Englethwaite Auxiliary Military Hospital spent a pleasant time on Christmas Day. After attending church at Cotehill the men were entertained at dinner, and afterwards, by the invitation of Dr and Mrs Murray, the afternoon was spent at Eden Brows, where the men partook of tea. The hospital was beautifully decorated; an interesting feature being roses of different shades made by Private Wenn, Cambridge Regiment, who with others is very proficient on fancy needlework. Gifts of all kinds have flowed in from many quarters, and the Commandant, Miss Ida C Kentish, is grateful for them.

26 December 1916

Today, Boxing Day, the Holme Patriotic Committee entertained to tea all the soldiers' wives, mothers and children belonging to the village, numbering close upon 100. An excellent tea was served and afterwards games etc were indulged in by the children, the music being supplied by Miss Burtholme. A huge Christmas tree contained a present for each soldier's child, distributed by Father Christmas (Miss Burtholme). The chairman was Mr RM Deighton.

27 December 1916

Royal Navy Submarine HMS K10 launched at Barrow. [Scrapped 1921]

28 December 1916

This evening Sergeant Joseph Skerry, of the Border Regiment,  who recently won the Military Medal in France, had a great reception at a public meeting in the Endowed Schoolroom, Great Broughton, when he was presented with a gold watch and a wallet of notes of the combined value of £ 50, the gift of the Cumberland Miners Association.

29 December 1916

Today the Carlisle Journal's Ladies column said It seems certain that our rulers will impose meat abstinence one day in each week; not a very great hardship in itself, but to reconcile many families to the change those who cater for them must acquire more knowledge of meatless cookery than a majority seem to possess. Hitherto no very great attention has been paid to this branch of cookery.

30 December 1916

Nurse Florence Irving, daughter of Mr J Irving, East View, Greenhead, who was a survivor from the hospital ship Britannic [sunk 21st November by submarine], is home on leave. One of her most valuable possessions is the life-belt which she put on when the ship was sinking.

31 December 1916

The number of eggs received for the wounded in December by Mr William Fleming at Penrith and Shap was 1,013. All these were supplied to the local hospitals.

01 January 1917

It is stated that Mrs Preston, of Grasmere, who liberated her workmen in the early days of the war, and has since brought her own coals daily from Windermere, has during the year 1916, covered in this way 6,136 miles.

02 January 1917

This week the Westmorland Gazette carried the following advert:
Mr Michael Hodgson begs to inform the numerous friends and customers of the firm of Messrs MB Hodgson & Son that during his absence on Military Service the Business WILL BE CARRIED ON as usual, in his absence, by the remaining Partner, Mr HAROLD HODGSON, with any assistance he may find necessary. All Orders sent to the Offices at Witherslack, Grange-over-Sands, or Highgate, Kendal, will have careful and personal attention.

03 January 1917

The Rev CGT Sale Pennington who is to take over the living of Kirkby Stephen is a cousin of General Neville, the victor of Verdun, whose mother was a sister of Mr Pennington's father. General Neville recently succeeded General Joffre as France's Generalissimo.

 

04 January 1917

A supper and concert on behalf of the comforts fund for Crosby Villa's men serving with the forces was well patronised. The total amount realised was £ 10.15s, from which, after paying expenses, some twenty local soldiers are to receive parcels.

05 January 1917

Well done Walter! Walter Cox, a Wigton Nelson School boy, has between 5th January 1916 and 5th January 1917, collected 3,218 eggs  for the National Egg Collection for Wounded Soldiers.

06 January 1917

A Kendal man, a private in the Machine Gun Corps, with the Salonika Force, writing to his father says 'I dare say you have read about the Invernia going down. Well I knew about it, because I was on it. I was saved after being knocked about in a swamped boat for three hours, and all my belongings were lost. I am now, January 6th, on an island somewhere in the Mediterranean, living in a sort of Robinson Crusoe fashion; but anything will do for me now.'

07 January 1917

Mr John Bowe, a former Minneapolis commission merchant, who went to France early in the war and volunteered to serve in the Foreign Legion, has been decorated with the War Cross. He was the eldest son of the late William Bowe of Bewaldeth, was born at Bassenthwaite, and went to America in 1887.

08 January 1917

An inquest was held at Flimby Lodge on the body of Margaret Gibson, wife of Joseph Gibson, a signalman on the London and North Western Railway, living at Barepot. The body was found lying about 50 yards below high water mark on the Flimby shore. The deceased's husband said his wife had been fretting over the loss of their eldest son who was killed in action in July. She never believed that he was dead, but that he would return at the end of the year. She had been further upset by letters from the War Office stating that her son William had gone down, but they had no son of that name. Another letter said that their son Thomas had gone down, but he was at home, not being of military age.

09 January 1917

Miss Constance Little, youngest daughter of Mr W Little, Hutton Hall, Penrith, was amongst the large number of nurses mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig's despatch for meritorious service. Miss Little was a member of the Penrith Ladies' VAD and soon after war broke out she went to London for special training, afterwards being sent to France.

10 January 1917

This week the local press printed a list of the 170 members of the Border Regiment officially reported as prisoners of war in Germany to whom food parcels are being regularly sent by the Carlisle Citizens League.

11 January 1917

Married at Saint Mary's Church, Carlisle, George Stanley Atkinson, musician, aged 20, to Alice Anne Bowman, munitions worker, aged 21.

A Mrs Arends of Arlecdon became chargeable to Whitehaven Poor Law Union. She was the wife of a German sailor interred at Knockaloe in the Isle of Man.

12 January 1917

The Munition Girl's Bicycle is Jepson's 'Identical' Model. It is a no-trouble bicycle at a popular price, built by competent cycle mechanics. RL Jepson Ltd Top of Finkle Street, Kendal.

13 January 1917

Cavendish Dock, Barrow. Company Sergeant Major Henry Lynch died today after being shot in a guardroom with a service rifle by another soldier, Private Thomas Clinton. There was no evidence of a motive.

14 January 1917

Married this week at St James Tebay, Mr John J Stephenson and Miss Dora A Young, both of Tebay. The vicar officiated. The bride wore a white voile dress and a veil and orange blossom, and was given away by her father.  Miss A Young, sister of the bride, and Miss A Stephenson, sister of the bridegroom, were the bridesmaids, and were dressed in amethyst voile, trimmed with skunk furs, and wore black picture hats. Sergeant R W Young, Northumberland Fusiliers, brother of the bride, undertook the duties of best man.

15 January 1917

Today was published the names of Border Regiment soldiers who are officially listed as missing. The list contains the name of 205 Border men.

16 January 1917

At this week's Tribunal for the West Ward of Westmorland, Mr R W Armstrong, proprietor of the Clifton training stables, applied for exemption of two jockeys; William Crisp and George Whewell. Mrs Armstrong, who appeared on her husband's behalf, said that already 26 lads had entered the army. They had just sent 31 horses and 11 lads to Ireland, to where the training stables are being transferred. Mr Wood (Agricultural representative); It seems strange you should be lenient with horse-racing and hard on farming. It was decided to exempt Crisp until June 5th and refuse Whewell. Mrs Armstrong said Whewell was so small that she was afraid he'd have to have help over the parapet (Laughter). Major Smith; We will put him in a tank (Laughter).

17 January 1917

At the Carlisle Tribunal today Dr Adams appealed for his chauffeur, John MacIntosh, aged 20, single. He said that the doctors in Carlisle were very hard pressed and it was essential to get about quickly. He was asked by the Tribunal if he had tried a female chauffeur. Dr Adams replied 'No, I would not care to try one in the bye-streets that I have to go into'. Major Fryers for the Tribunal asked 'Are you aware that the Mayor's motor car is driven by a lady?' The Tribunal granted MacIntosh conditional exemption.

18 January 1917

Whitehaven Market. Shortly after nine o'clock this morning a bellman announced at almost every street end that potato buyers should not pay more than one shilling per stone. As soon as the potato carts arrived extraordinary scenes were witnessed. In Duke Street there were three cartloads, and the owners were asking from 1s 10d and 2s per stone for the potatoes. A large number of women had congregated all carrying baskets or bags and all indignantly refused to pay the price asked by the farmers for the potatoes and ultimately two of the carts were taken away, while the other cart of potatoes was disposed of at one shilling per stone, the seller being literally besieged by the women who clamoured to be served.

19 January 1917

Kendal Police Court: Robert William Foster (22), farm servant, of Maryport, was charged with being an absentee without leave from the Border Regiment. PC Platt said he found the defendant in Stramongate at 2:15 that morning, and in reply to questions Foster said he had been enlisted at Carlisle last week and had torn his papers up. He had been hanging about the railway station ever since Friday, when he should have presented himself. A corporal from the Drill Hall gave evidence that defendant's papers were in order, and Foster was thereupon handed over to the military.

20 January 1917

ABOVE-DERWENT NEWSLETTER January 1917: Christmas Parcels. Boys of the Above-Derwent. In my last letter to you I said that you were always in our thoughts, and now with the aid of the Above-Derwent War Fund Committee, for whom I act as treasurer, we have been able to put our thoughts in a practical form by sending you each a Christmas parcel. One hundred and fourteen parcels were sent at a total cost of £ 36. They were posted to East Africa, Burma, India, Salonika, Malta, France and Blighty. The parcels contained the following:- 114 tablets of Pears soap, 120 boxes of oxo tablets, 228 khaki handkerchiefs, 28lb of peppermints, 114 lead pencils, 128 pairs of socks, 12 mufflers, and 3,600 cigarettes (not woodbines). S. Shepherd

21 January 1917

Baptised this day at Brougham St Ninian's and St Wilfred, George Joffre, son of Joseph and Lizzie Jaques.

22 January 1917

'This is the trouble we school attendance officers have at the present time', remarked Mr Marshall, in prosecuting a number of parents at the Carlisle Police Court today for not sending their children to school. 'Everybody, including the mother, is working on munitions and the children are left to look after themselves'. Mr Marshall added that big wages were the attraction. The Mayor asked ' How do the children get their meals?' Mr Marshall 'They do the best they can. At dinner time they go into the house and get a piece of bread and butter and some tea.' Fines of 2s 6d were imposed.

23 January 1917

In a letter of thanks to Mrs Waite, Secretary to the Bassenthwaite Needlework Committee, Private James William Holt wrote:
The trenches where we are now are very bad. They were captured from 'Fritz' not long ago, and have not got properly rebuilt yet. The bad weather has made things much worse, for the poor beggars in the trenches are standing in deep water and mud. As much as possible is done for them by sending dry socks and boots up. I hear our lads discovered and old dug-out yesterday with about two hundred dead Germans in it. They had their gas helmets on, and some of them were sitting around a table and had been playing carts evidently.

24 January 1917

At Barrow, Sergeant Thexton was publicly presented with the Military Medal by Colonel Harkness. The Sergeant, who was in the Yeomanry, won his distinction for valour at Loos, where he took charge of a machine-gun when the officer became a casualty. Thexton, who is a native of Barrow, now resides at Workington. He has served fifteen and a half years in the Army, and his time has expired. He married Miss Bleasdale, daughter of Mrs Bleasdale, Challoner Street, Cockermouth.

25 January 1917

Today a meeting was held at Warton to consider the desirability of forming a war savings association. Mr R Unsworth presided, and there were upwards of 30 persons present. It was resolved to form an association and that the vicar, the Rev EWA Ogilvy, be chairman. Miss Heaton (schoolmistress) was elected secretary, and Miss G Ogilvy was elected treasurer, with a committee.

26 January 1917

REGIMENTAL BADGE BROOCHES. Silver on Mother-of Pearl 2/6 each. Dalgleish, Under the Town Hall and 55 Scotch Street, Carlisle.

27 January 1917

Rapid strides are being made with the provision of accommodation in Carlisle for women workers, and over 200 girls are now in occupation  of the Eden Bridge Hostel in Hardwicke Circus. Further accommodation for girl workers will shortly be available in the Great Central Hotel and the Carlisle Central Conservative Club on the Viaduct, both of which have been commandeered by the authorities.

28 January 1917

Christened this day at Ivegill, Ernest Festubert son of Ernest (soldier) and Gertrude Brown. [The battle of Festubert was the British attack around Artois.]

29 January 1917

Hayton House Hospital. To the Editor of the Carlisle Journal. Sir - May I venture through the medium of your newspaper to appeal to the generosity of the landowners and farmers of this district for the gift of potatoes for the soldiers in my hospital, We are very short of potatoes, and are experiencing great difficulty in obtaining anything like an adequate supply. I may say that I shall be most grateful to those kind friends who are willing to give even a small quantity and hope they will communicate with me direct, so that I can arrange to fetch the potatoes. Marjorie Lamb, Commandant, Hayton House Hospital, January 29th, 1917.

30 January 1917

At the annual meeting of the Cumberland Miners' Association this week it was decided to petition the Government to suspend the drink traffic during the war and for six months afterwards. The meeting emphatically protested against the increase in railway fares and called for their restoration to the normal prices.

31 January 1917

John Hall, farmer of Rosley notes in his diary today:
This wretched war drags along without any signs of a finish, we are threatened with signs of famine in the future owing to the large number of ships sunk by the enemy's submarines. We are being told by the government to [produce] more and more..potatoes and owing to the scarcity of labour this will be no easy matter.

01 February 1917

ABOVE-DERWENT NEWSLETTER February 1917: Lingholme, the residence of Lord Rochdale, is now being converted into a hospital for wounded soldiers, and an energetic V. A. D. Committee is hard at work. The young ladies, who are qualified to assist with nursing, are simply agog with excitement. Wouldn't we like to be a wounded soldier at Lingholme!

02 February 1917

In the annual report of the Whitehaven's Working Men's Institution it is stated that during the year the number of members with the colours has increased from 48 to 68 and four have lost their lives, viz, Private Joseph Callow, Lance-Corporal Henry Elliott, Private Felix McGuinness and Private Edward Gribbin. An old member, Sergeant Isaac Eccles, received the Military Cross.

03 February 1917

Have you helped the 'Big Push' that has started by putting all the money you possibly can behind it? If not - Buy War Loan today. The more you lend - the sooner the War will end. C Tennant, Secretary, War Savings Committee, 23, King Street, Wigton.

04 February 1917

The Bishop of Carlisle, in the February issue of the 'Nineteenth Century' joins his voice to the voices of those who express a belief that there is peril in any proposal for peace which comes from the Kaiser. The Bishop recalls the answer of Jehu to Joram 'What hast though to do with peace?' As battle with evil is good, truce with evil is bad; and the Bishop states his reasons for holding that a peace settlement with the Kaiser now would be not only dangerous but wicked.

05 February 1917

Mrs IJ Brough, 15 Warwick Road, Carlisle, today received a telegram from France saying that her husband Lance-Corporal IJ Brough, had died in the First Canadian Hospital, Etaples, yesterday, from severe wounds received last October on the Somme Front.

06 February 1917

Mr Justice Low had before him in the Divorce Court the undefended petition of Mr George Nichol, York Street, Penrith, for a dissolution of his marriage with his wife Mrs Alice Maud Nichol.  Petitioner said he was a fitter at Jarrow-on-Tyne. He married his wife on 1st January 1906 at the Wesleyan Chapel, Penrith, and they had one child. They lived at York Street until 29th October 1914, when petitioner enlisted, and went to India in a Territorial regiment. He returned in May 1916, and received certain information about his wife. She admitted she'd had an illegitimate child, and said that the father was Robert Collett, a member of the Westmorland and Cumberland Yeomanry, who was billeted in the house. His wife asked him to forgive her, but he refused. His Lordship granted a degree nisi and gave petitioner the custody of his child.

07 February 1917

Attempted Submarine Blockade. Owing to the German Submarine menace Scandinavian shipping is suspended, and several of our shipments are held up. Foreseeing transport difficulties, however, we have already laid in heavier stocks than usual, and still have excellent Krafts and other Wrappings at lowest market prices. If you require paper do not delay in purchasing lest stocks be exhausted. Send for Samples to James Beaty and Sons, Licensed Paper Importers, Carlisle.

08 February 1917

By a vote of 107 to 8 the parishioners of Windermere, at a vestry meeting, having accepted and approved the offer of Sir W Forwood  to provide a chapel as an extension of the existing church, to the memory of the local men fallen in the war. Only two objections were hinted at. One was exclamatory! 'Better give the money to the poor!' which was too graceless and impertinent to need refutation. The other was the expression of a fear that the proposed addition to the old church might not accord with the architectural features of the building. This fear was laid aside when it was explained that the plans would be scrutinised by the architects Messrs Paley and Austin before they can receive the sanction of the Consistory Court.

09 February 1917

Our Ladies Budget in today's Carlisle Journal commented  '…it does not follow that any woman in war-time is justified in buying very expensive garments of any kind. Thousands of patriotic women are protesting, as I do, against extravagance in dress; yet Fashion and her votaries go on unheeding.'

10 February 1917

Corporal Harold Hyde, of Milnthorope, has demonstrated what a soldier on active service thinks of the war loan. He has fought for his country and won distinction for his conduct in the field. He has lately been home on leave, and was just about to start from Milnthorpe for the front again when a few friends and neighbours presented him with a sum of money as a substantial form of congratulation. The gallant corporal at once handed the gift to his mother, 'to put into the war loan;' and he went away probably the happier for being able to render his country pecuniary as well as military service.

11 February 1917

CARK. Killed in action.n BAYLIFF, Sapper R, Royal Engineers, was killed on February 11th. Previous to enlistment he was employed by JW Braithwaite of Grange in whose service he had been since leaving school. He was 31 and leaves a wife and two young children. In a letter to his wife his officer says: 'Your husband was working just behind the line after a successful attack, when he was hit by a German machine-gun bullet and killed instantly. He was buried on Monday, February 12th, and a cross was placed on his grave by his comrades. He was one of my best sappers, and a good soldier, and we all feel his loss'. [Westmorland Gazette 24.02.1917]

12 February 1917

Pte John Robson 17415 Border Regiment, has been MISSING since November 18th. If this should meet the eye of any of his Comrades who can GIVE any INFORMATION regarding him, please communicate with THOMAS ROBSON, 241 Ayton Street, Byker, Newcastle-on-Tyne, Northumberland.

13 February 1917

ELLIOTT - In loving memory of our dear son Private John Elliott, King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment, who died of wounds in Mesopotamia on 13th February ,1917. 'Gone but not forgotten'. 'Ever remembered by his father, mother, brothers, and sisters, also brother-in-law, sister-in-law, and grandmother.' [Barrow News 16.02.1918].

14 February 1917

The Rev W Humphreys and Family desire to express their sincere thanks  for the great sympathy shown to them at the loss of their dear son, of whom they were so proud [Lieut. Arthur Idwal Humphreys, Royal Naval Division,  was killed in action on 5th February. He was the second son of Rev Humphreys, head master of Nelson School, Wigton].

15 February 1917

Have you sent your Soldier his BODY SHIELD yet? Don't hesitate, it might be too late. Write or call at ANDERSON'S, 121 Stricklangate, Kendal.

16 February 1917

The Lancashire County Tribunal for North Lonsdale sat at Ulverston today; Mr PJ Hibbert presiding for the first time. Mr FW Poole represented a Grange antique dealer (40). The Grange tribunal refused exemption, but the man lost his wife on Boxing Day, and he had been left with nine children, the eldest 15 and the youngest 9 weeks old. Alderman Taylor said the local tribunal did not consider the antique business was of national importance. Mr Evans: Is he not doing work when he is looking after his boys? The Chairman said the man would have to do work of national importance on two days a week, which confirmed the local tribunal's decision. Mr Poole asked if the appeal would be allowed to the Central Tribunal. The Chairman; On a question of law? Mr Poole: Yes, he has nine children.

17 February 1917

BIRKETTS', The London Draper, Kendal. NOTICE. Having joined HM forces I have decided to leave the business in charge of my Wife, trusting you will give her the support you have favoured me with in the past. Thanking you in anticipation, Respectfully Yours, Wm. C Birkett.

18 February 1917

Englethwaite Auxiliary Military Hospital. There is nothing much to report during this last week. No patients have been admitted and none have been discharged. The usual outings have taken place, and Mr Dias kindly lent his car today to tale patients to church service in Carlisle.

19 February 1917

Today the Penrith bench had before them a whole family named Richardson - father, three sons, a grandson and son-in-law - hawkers living at Brampton near Appleby, on charges of deserting from the Army, and of concealing or assisting to conceal the deserters. On Monday afternoon Chief Superintendent Barron, finding the family were in three camps at Hesket, organised a 'round up', in which a large police force was employed. One of the men wanted was found concealed under a bed in a living van, and another, whose ASC uniform, was produced in a rotting state, was caught not far away. When the men were all captured, the police were attached by the women-folk with stones and sods. The father was fined £ 15 and costs and the others were ordered to be handed over to the military. The Bench made an order for special rewards to the police.

20 February 1917

This week two postcards were received by Mr M Sagar, Winton, Kirkby Stephen from his son Private William Sagar, Borders, saying that he is a prisoner of war at Gafangenenlager. The postcards were dated November 29th and January 5th; the former written four days after he fell into the hands of the Germans. Private Sagar wrote 'We made an advance about a fortnight ago, and a good many of us were taken prisoner. We stayed in a dug-out for over a week, with hardly anything to eat, and we had to give in on November 25th.  I was lucky to be captured as many were killed'.  The second card from Gafangenenlager contains a request for food parcels to be sent to him. He was a grocer's assistant in Kirkby Stephen before enlisting.

21 February 1917

Thursby Parish magazine commented; There will be no special preachers at our Friday week night services during this coming season of Lent, which we enter upon at the end of the month, on Ash Wednesday, February 21st. The war has reduced the number of the clergy in the towns, and in several ways made it difficult to obtain outside help. In the circumstances of these days, therefore, it seems better this year to hold our services quietly ourselves. They will largely take the form of an intercession service for our country and our men and at these services the Vicar will give a series of addresses upon the Gospel for each week.  We hope that those who have friends and relatives with either fighting or away will avail themselves of this opportunity to lay their prayers before God for their own and for their country's needs.

22 February 1917

Messrs Carr, White, and Co Ltd, Wigton, are at present experiencing an exceptionally busy period. They are engaged in supplying War Office contracts for upwards of one thousand tons of marmalade, jams and bottled fruits for troops both at home and with the Expeditionary Forces abroad. As it is improbable that Wigton can supply all the labour needed, it is the firm's intention to run a  motor service daily to Mealsgate and Ireby districts with a view to securing a supply of the very good 'material' which is to be found in that district. It is understood that very attractive wages are being paid.

23 February 1917

It was reported this week that Mrs Peart Robinson, Dallam Tower, honorary secretary of the Milnthorpe War Working Parties, had forwarded the following articles to the Red Cross Society, for the wounded in France;- 50 cushions, 24 shirts, 15 mufflers, 60 pair stockings, 2 flannel vests, 2 cardigan jackets, 2 ties, 127 comfort bags, 38 caps, 19 pairs mittens, 72 pairs socks and 1 pair cuffs.

24 February 1917

A Windermere girl of eighteen was before the Leeds magistrates this week on a charge of looting jewellery and money in a house at which she lodged. Her business in Leeds was supposed to be that of 'doing her bit' as a worker, during the war. She got into company with another girl, keener, more sophisticated, and with her own ideas as to what constitutes a 'spree'. The two went off to London with the loot, and when that was exhausted the Windermere maiden was left in the lurch. Fortunately the magistrates had compassion upon her; her father had faith in the efficiency of the lesson she had learnt and promised to indemnify the person whose property had been stolen; and the erring girl was set at liberty. War work for country lasses is a capital idea from a national point of view; but the risk it involves to their character is quite as real as the risk to their health, unless they are kept straight by instinct, experience or wise shepherding.

25 February 1917

After some months interval Thursby Church bells sounded once more for Evensong today. One of the memories of the Great War, which will remain long after peace has come, will be the precautions that we have had to take to guard our churches from destruction by German raiders.

26 February 1917

At Barrow, today, John Simpson, farmer, of Ormsgill, Barrow, was fined £ 10 for giving false information on the agricultural census as to cattle, and also the age of one of his sons. The police evidence was that Simpson had overstated the number of cattle, and that his son was 21 years of age and not 17, as on the census. He had produced to the police a birth certificate on which it was found the name had been altered, the certificate having reference to another son who had died.

27 February 1917

BARROW - There is a brisk all-round demand for iron, and makers are not able to fulfil all requirements with the existing rate of output. Local consumption alone takes up big proportions of the make. Prices steady at maximum rates, with mixed numbers of Bessemer iron 127s 6d, and special brands 140s; warrants, 115s per ton net cash. Steel makers very busy on steel for munitions.

28 February 1917

Her Majesty's Theatre, Carlisle. All this week Carlton Wallace, Evelyn Carlton and Company in THE ENEMY IN OUR MIDST; the story of the Great Zeppelin Raids. Thrilling incidents, showing how Alien Enemies work in Britain. The 'Naturalised' Englishman and German 'Kultur'. The Plot to Torpedo the Transport. The Telegram, 'Killed in Action'. The Wife's Prayer Answered'.

01 March 1917

The Bishop of Barrow paid a special visit to Penrith this afternoon for the purpose of holding a confirmation service, at which the candidates were three wounded soldiers, and two local ladies.  One soldier had lost his leg and was unable to leave his bed, another had had his leg amputated but was able to move on crutches, and the third is injured in the arm. The service, attended by the inmates, was held in the main ward of St Andrew's Hospital.

02 March 1917

LET US HELP YOU WITH YOUR SPRING CLEANING. With the ever-increasing demand for more Women in Munition Factories, and on the Land, many and many a well-ordered Household is servantless to-day. And Spring cleaning - not so thorough as usual, perhaps, but still Spring cleaning in some degree or other - is now waiting to be done. The Lady of the House will find our services more valuable than ever under existing conditions. Curtains, Carperts, Cretonnes, Loose-Covers, W.Wright and Son, Highmore House, Carlisle.

03 March 1917

A letter was recently received by Mr Charles Hawkins, the Hydro, Silloth, from his son, Charles, of the Motor Transport in German East Africa. He wrote "It is very hot here, but not yet so hot as I expected; even now it is 120 deg  F., and I can stand it alright, but our pace when walking is about two miles per hour, and our actions are likewise. We feel very lazy, and the perspiration streams off us. The mosquitoes bother us terribly. We sleep in tents and the ground is covered with ants, fleas, spiders, lizards and all sorts and sizes of creeping, crawling things, which make it very uncomfortable, especially at night.  There is nothing much is Dar-i-Salaam it is mostly occupied by British soldiers. Before the Germans evacuated the town they blew up all the landing stages and poisoned the water; we have to boil it before it is fit to drink. At mid-day the sun is directly over our heads, and our shadows are about the size of a petrol tin".

04 March 1917

Carlisle Citizens' League. At the weekly meeting of the League it was recalled that the League forwarded a consignment of Christmas puddings to the Border Battalions in India and Burmah. An intimation has now been received from Peshawar that the puddings had been received by the men there in good condition, and much appreciated.

05 March 1917

It was announced this week that the French Government had conferred the Croix de Guerre upon Mr JV Phelps, of Lazonby Hall, in recognition of his hard and meritorious work in the Ambulance Division during the fighting at Verdun last year.

06 March 1917

Definite news of the death of Private John Holmes, Border Regiment, has been received by his widow at Northside, Workington. A lady living in Sutton-in-Ashfield, Nottinghamshire, has forwarded his diary and testament, given to her by a friend over from France, who was near him when he was shot through the heart. Deceased worked at Clifton Colliery, and was in the Salvation Army. He leaves two children. His younger child was born the day before his mother received word that he was missing.

07 March 1917

Mr John Robinson Gunson of Ghyll Bank, Whitehaven, draper, applied for authority to place on the south wall of the nave of St James Parish Church, Whitehaven a brass bearing the inscription ' In loving memory of Leslie Robert Schrader Gunson, Lieutenant RGA, - Heavy Battery, aetat xxi, killed on the Somme, July 18th 1916, while searching for his missing men, and interred at the Quarry Cemetery, Montauban. 'Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends'. - The faculty was ordered to issue.

08 March 1917

This week Captain and Brevet-Major Hamlet Lewthwaite Riley, DSO, Rifle Brigade, only son of Mr Hamlet Riley, Ennim, Great Blencow, was gazetted as having been awarded the Order of Danilo, fourth class, by the King of Montenegro, for distinguished services during the campaign.

09 March 1917

This evening a dance was organised by the Canadian soldier lumber-men, who have recently been engaged in cutting down trees on the Netherby Estate near Riddings. The dance, in the Canonbie Public Hall, passed off very well. Sixty couples were present and Mr Thornton's  orchestra provided the music. A surplus of £ 3.7s was handed over to the Local Soldiers Comforts Fund.

10 March 1917

The Reverend WB Graham, Vicar of Askham, has offered his services to his farming parishioners, and is now actively engaged on the land six days a week, Mr Graham is following the threshing  machines around the various farms, and is doing his day's work on the thresher with other labourers.

11 March 1917

Seriously wounded  this day at Ancre, France,  Lance Corporal Shaw, grandson of Mr and Mrs Robert Woof, Leasgill, Milnthorpe. Admitted to hospital, where it was found necessary to amputate his right leg, he died on March 14th. Lance Corporal Shaw had emigrated to Australia in 1910. His death was reported in the Westmorland Gazette on March 24th.

12 March 1917

SUBSTITUTION SCHEME AT BARROW. A substitution scheme is about to come into operation at Barrow. The men to be taken from the works are those in semi-skilled type who have been classified  either A or B (i) and a considerable number will be released for the Army. Women workers are to be employed at Barrow Steelworks.

13 March 1917

Today the annual meeting of the Wigton Agricultural Society was held with Mr T Richardson of The Wreay in the chair. Mr Waugh, secretary, reported a profit of £ 4.0s 5d on the year. His report stated that for the third year no show was held on account of the war.

14 March 1917

Mrs Rhoda Bell, daughter of Mr James Bonson, Kirkby Stephen, has had the honour of being received by the King at Buckingham Palace, and of receiving the Victoria Cross won by her husband, Lieut  Donald S Bell, Yorkshire Regiment.

15 March 1917

At St John's Room, Windermere this week, Mr D Thomas Curtin lectured on his experiences and observations during three hundred days spent in Germany. His narration gripped the attention of his audience from start to finish, although he was on his feet, without interval, for nearly two hours. Mr Curtin passed to and fro in Germany, adroit yet persistent, closely observing all that was going forward. He told of the perils and difficulties which are besetting Germany; of her iron methods, her desperate energy, and her still powerful resources, and enabled his hearers to take adequate measure of the gigantic task to which the Allies have put their hands, and in which he believes they will prove victorious. His American accent made his words a little difficult to catch at times, especially towards the end of a sentence, and in addition he apologised for a cold.

16 March 1917

Englishwoman with excellent knowledge of Continental languages, seeks post where such could be utilised, either in school, hotel or as Interpreter on agricultural estate where prisoners of war are employed. Write SR, Gazette Office, Kendal.

17 March 1917

Advert from today's Westmorland Gazette THE WAR. THE WAR. E and C DAWSON. Owing to their manager, Mr A Beadle, being called up, leaving them without any male assistant, beg to state they purpose offering their entire Stock during March at such reductions in price as to effect a clearance, after which the balance of Stock will be sold in one lot to the trade and the Premises closed during the War. The Clearance includes all New Goods arriving daily, which they cannot cancel. Waterloo House, Kendal.

18 March 1917

This week it was reported that The Military Medal had been awarded to Private John Brown, aged 22, Border Regiment, a Workington man, nephew of  Mrs Robinson, Findlay Place. He formerly worked at Lowca and is now in hospital with a wounded thigh. Whilst fulfilling his duties in the trenches a live bomb from the enemy dropped in front of him and amongst his comrades. He instantly picked it up and threw it outside the trench, with the result that it exploded in the air. By this action he saved the lives of four of his comrades. It was some months later, on January 27th, that he received his present wound.

19 March 1917

The Workington Tribunal was held this week in the Council Chamber, Carnegie Hall, Finkle Street, Workington; the Mayor, Mr Fred Hall, presiding, to review 74 cases of men under 31 years of age holding certificates of exemption. With regard to a permanent way man on the Cleator and Workington Junction Railway, the Military Representative said the Tribunal could not touch the man. He was very valuable in keeping the line in order.

20 March 1917

The following appeal appeared in this week's Carlisle Journal :
Sir-Will you allow me to make an appeal, through your valuable paper, to Jerseymen who may be residing in Carlisle or neighbourhood, to communicate with me, as we have Jersey wounded soldiers in hospital in Carlisle who would be glad of visits by some of their compatriots. DJ Hamon

21 March 1917

The monthly meeting of the Carlisle Advisory  Committee of the Central Control Board took place today. Mr EC Sanders, General Manager of the Carlisle scheme, reported that, subject to formal contract, it had been agreed to purchase the whole undertaking of the Maryport Brewery with all its licensed premises, numbering 123.

22 March 1917

Cumberland Lassie At The Plough was the caption over a photograph in this week's Carlisle Journal. The photo showed Miss Mary Teasdale, aged 13, ploughing on her father's farm at High Side, Embleton.

23 March 1917

The East Westmorland Tribunal was held at Kirkby Stephen this week. Thomas Loveday, Kirkby Stephen, produced a copy of his birth certificate, which showed he was 42 years of age last January, and therefore exempt from military service.

24 March 1917

Cockermouth Castle Auxiliary Hospital (20 beds) and Bankfield Auxiliary Hospital, Workington (50 beds) open.

25 March 1917

Christened this day at Saint Mary's Church, Carlisle, Jane Somme Graves, daughter to Miss Graves, unmarried munitions worker of 2 Scotch Street, Carlisle.

26 March 1917

A Kendal greengrocer, Thomas Rigg, of Kirkland has been fined by the magistrates for charging more than the fixed minimum as the price of potatoes sold to his customers. The maximum is one and a half pence per pound or ten and a half pence per half stone. Rigg, under the pretence that he was selling seed potatoes, charged eleven and a half pence. It was a mean evasion, both in the motive and the resultant advantage to himself.

27 March 1917

This afternoon the annual meeting of the Penrith Agricultural Show was held at the George Hotel, Penrith, Mr EO Bolton, Leeming presided. Mr T Heskett said that this was no time for shows, and in his opinion they would be doing wrong even to think of it. Mr Toppin said it was absolutely unthinkable to discuss such an idea as that of holding a show under the circumstances, and every member of the committee was of the same opinion.

28 March 1917

Today Mr and Mrs Wilson Lamb, Biskey Howe Gardens, Windermere,  received news that Private Herbert Lamb, their youngest son, is missing in France. The Lieutenant in a letter states that that Private Lamb, along with some others, went on a patrol on the night of March 13th  and that it was feared that in the darkness they walked into the enemy's lines and were captured.

29 March 1917

Burgh-by-Sands Parish Council agreed that the state of the road at Thurstonfield would be referred for consideration to the Rural District Council at the termination of the war.

30 March 1917

The Carlisle Journal carried the following appeal Will Second Lieutenant G. Calvert, Machine Gun Corps, whose letter appealing for comforts for his Company was published in this column a few weeks ago, send his address, as a parcel sent to him has been returned as insufficiently addressed?

31 March 1917

The following telegram has been sent to the Admiralty representative at Barrow for publication in the district ;- 'The strike at Barrow is having a serious effect upon the output  of shells for the Navy. The Government have promised the men arbitration and a decision within a week if they return to work at once. The men of the Fleet rely upon their comrades in the workshops to stand by them against the common enemy'. Edward Carson, First Lord of the Admiralty. The cause of the trouble is the alleged cutting of time allowances for work done under the premium bonus system.

01 April 1917

The Barrow engineers who are on strike have decided on a ballot by 2,608 to 550, not to return to work pending the consideration of their grievances by a composite conference, as suggested by the Executive Council of the Amalgamated Society of Engineers. The Government announce that they are bound to regard the matter as one of grave consequences and will consider the steps necessary to deal with it.

02 April 1917

LOST AND FOUND. Leather Note Case, containing Notes. Lost  either at Penton or Carlisle: Driving Licence, Army Discharge Form etc - Finder rewarded on returning to B. Beeby, 8 Chapel Street, Carlisle.

03 April 1917

FOR WARTIME COOKERY; Flaked Maize for puddings and Blancmange, four and a half pence per pound. Turban Dates in Cartons, eight pence. MAUGHAM'S CASH GROCEY STORES, 93 Main Street, Cockermouth.

04 April 1917

ALLOTMENT Garden Holders are advised to make the best use of every foot of land for increasing the Food of the people. For reliable tested Seeds at keenest prices. - Fergus Lamb, Seed Expert, The Kendal Horticultural Stores, 2 Kent Street, Kendal.

05 April 1917

This week's Westmorland Gazette carried the following advert VAD Hospital. OUR Soldiers are without potatoes! May we beg some farmer to supply us at the maximum price of one and a half pence per pound. Please reply to the Quartermaster, VAD Hospital, Kendal.

06 April 1917

R W Pattinson, Butcher [Kendal], desires to thank his many Friends and Customers for past support. Having to join up in His Majesty's Forces the BUSINESS WILL BE CLOSED FOR THE DURATION OF THE WAR.

07 April 1917

The Right Hon JW Lowther, MP, writing from the Speaker's House to 'the men of Penrith' on behalf of the National Service movement, says -
We have now reached a moment of supreme importance in the world-wide struggle for national existence. Our armies are advancing on all fronts; our Navy is coping with the most serious menace which has threatened her food supply; our finances have been subjected to the greatest strain ever placed upon them; an appeal is made to all civilians to give a helping hand where it is most needed. A prompt and wide-spread response will hearten up our sailors and soldiers, will encourage our Allies and dismay our neighbours. Now is the time.
''Now set the teeth and stretch the nostrils wide,
Hold hard the breath and bend up every spirit
To his full height''
Yours sincerely
James W Lowther

08 April 1917

The memory of Private James Patterson Rankin, of Lamplugh Cottage, was honoured at a special service held in Lamplugh Church this evening. In spite of a heavy snow storm there was a very large attendance, many coming long distances to join in the tribute to a young soldier who had both in his life and in his death proved himself right worthy.

09 April 1917

Mrs Jas. George, Lawson Street, Maryport, has been informed by the owners that the steamer commanded by her husband has been torpedoed and sunk and that Captain George was taken prisoner on board the submarine. No word has yet been received from Captain George, but a letter from the wife of the Chief Officer shows that her husband and other members of the crew have been landed in an allied country.

10 April 1917

Royal Navy Submarine HMS K17 launched at Barrow. [Sunk 1918]

11 April 1917

The parish of Addingham has up to now contributed 9,647 eggs for soldiers, and at Cliburn two boys collected over 120 last week. At Crosby Ravensworth the school children have collected 981; and at Great Salkeld, in addition to Christmas gifts, each local soldier with the colours has had a parcel from the Soldiers and Sailors Fund.

12 April 1917

Independent Labour Party, Broughton branch. Look Out! Look Out! Special visit of W. L. Wallhead (prospective Labour candidate for Coventry) Come and hear "democracy and the future". Questions invited. The Endowed School at 7pm today.

13 April 1917

The editorial in today's Carlisle Journal commented The important changes which are contemplated in the treatment of war-wrecked soldiers were explained by Mr Barnes, the Pensions Minister, in Glasgow, on Tuesday. Even those discharged soldiers whose incapacity is not due to their military service are to meet with considerate treatment and receive a gratuity. Those who are victims of the war will not in future be left to the sympathy of charitable persons until such time as the slow-working pensions' machinery gets into motion. Particulars concerning every discharged soldier  will be forwarded to the local Pensions Committee immediately the man is fit to leave hospital, and the patient's final discharge will be delayed until he has had some preliminary training and is able to enter a course of curative and industrial training in the district in which he elects to reside.

14 April 1917

MILNTHORPE. Good-bye to Parish Magazines. The vicar announces that after a run of 20 years he is obliged to stop the magazine owing to the increased cost of paper, which is now four times a much as it was two years ago, and the distributors were afraid that there would be a falling off in the sales if the price were to be doubled.

15 April 1917

Mr Edward Thomas Baldwin, Gloucester Place, Portland Square, London, applied for a faculty to place on the South wall of the parish church of Dalton, on the east side of the door, leading to the lead roof in the side chapel, a copper repousse tablet bearing the inscription:
"In Loving memory of Anthony Edward Baldwin, a midshipman, R.N., H.M.S. 'Queen Mary', killed in action, battle of Jutland, May 31st, 1916, aged 16."
The faculty was granted.

16 April 1917

Great Clifton soldiers' comfort sewing class. The ladies held their weekly meeting this afternoon in the Co-operative Hall. Outfits of comforts were completed for nine parcels, which were dispatched to soldiers at the front, after cases of tobacco and chocolate had been enclosed from the Tommies cigarette fund. This week Mrs Mires and Miss M. A. Tinnion supplied the tea.

17 April 1917

The annual meeting of the Penrith Board of Guardians was held today. The Chairman, Mr RH Thompson, said the great matter they would have to deal with was the shortage of food. They would have to deal very carefully with the dietry of the institution. The clerk showed that in the September half of 1913 the cost of maintaining each inmate, including salaries and establishment charges, was 6s 10d per head. In the March half of 1917 it had risen to 10s 7d per head.

18 April 1917

The following letter appeared in today's West Cumberland Times. THE EDUCATION OF SAILOR'S CHILDREN. Proposed Flag Day or Subscription Day for Cumberland on Jutland Day May 31st. Sir - we write to ask the co-operation of the kindly hearts of Cumberland in a scheme organised by the Navy League to help the education of the children (boys and girls) of the brave men of the Navy and Mercantile Marine, who have laid down their lives and are laying down their lives for king and country.

19 April 1917

Since the war began a large number of shops have been closed in Kendal, In some instances this was probably due to trade and in others it was attributable to the tenants being called to the colours. The shops which have been closed include ;- Finkle Street - Mr T. Atkinson, bootmaker; Jepson's cycle shop; Mr P Hogarth, butcher; Messrs E and C Dawson, drapers. Stricklandgate - Messrs Redmayne, tailors. Allhallows Lane - Mr Armistead, butcher. Market Place - Mr Hutchinson, butcher; Mr F.R.Clegg, draper; Mr A Duncan, fruiterer, Stramongate - Mr Thornborrow, butcher. Kirkland - Mr R.W.Pattinson, butcher. Highgate - Mr W.C.Shaw, ironmonger. Mr Mooney, butcher.

20 April 1917

Twelve patients were admitted to the Englethwaite Auxiliary Hospital, Cotehill, arriving today at 5am. The men had crossed the Channel, and had come from Dover. Eleven were wounded, and one was sick. The total number of patients is now 23. The last arrivals have been in the heavy fighting of the last 10 days, and are glad to be once more in England. The long fell, with the hills behind of the Pennines Range (which face some of the wards) remind them of Vimy Ridge, and they have many experiences to relate of their time in France.

21 April 1917

Workington Munition Girls 4 Carlisle Munition Girls 1
The football game was played at Lonsdale Park, Workington, raising £ 110 15s 0d for the Prisoners of War Fund and the Workington Star 'Smokers' Fund.

22 April 1917

CLOSING DOWN owing to the War. The Kendal Optical House will shortly be closed for the duration of the war, owing to Mr Whitehead having to join up. Customers requiring Glasses should consult Mr Whitehead immediately, and so get the advice of the ONLY Optician in Kendal and District qualified for Sight Testing. 21a, Stramongate, Kendal.

23 April 1917

Private C Tennant, aged 21, Border Regiment, was killed in action today. His parents, Mr and Mrs Tennant of the Queen's Temperance Hotel, Wigton received the news in a letter from  Sergeant-Major R. Haysom  who wrote: It is with sad heart that I write to tell you of the death of your son and my devoted batman, who was killed in action at 7pm, 23rd. He was hit by shrapnel and died instantly, and is being buried near the place where he fell, side by side with his comrades who fought so bravely in the same action yesterday. This will be a great shock to you, Mrs Tennant and family, and I mourn with you in your great loss. May God give you strength to bear the sorrow!

24 April 1917

This week it was announced that Private Evan J Hughes, only son of Mrs Hughes, Ivy House, Little Langdale, was killed in action on 14th of April in France. He was 24 years of age. He joined the Borderers, and went out in December 1915. News of his death was sent through by his chum, Private William Tyson, of Elterwater, who was with him when he fell. Before the war he was employed at Hodge Close Slate Quarries.

25 April 1917

Father Maurus Kelly, formerly of Cleator Moor, is now in the Army as a Major. A Cleator Moor man who met him at the front in a letter home says Major Kelly was awarded the Military Cross for rescuing wounded men under shell fire.

26 April 1917

A meeting was held this evening in the Richmond Hall, Fisher Street, Carlisle, in support of electoral reform. The Mayor said that 'it would be a crying shame if the women who had made good so splendidly during the last few years were to be debarred from the selection of the men who would have to rule the State after the war.(Cheers) The suffrage of women must come.'

27 April 1917

Lance Corporal John Phinn, Bridge Lane, Willow Holme, Carlisle, died of wounds in France today. He served through the Dardanelles. Mrs Phinn, his mother, has five sons serving. The oldest Sergeant P. Phinn has been wounded twice - the first time in the retreat from Mons, and the second time in the 'push' on July 1st. The news of the death of Lance Corporal Phinn appeared in the Carlisle Journal of 29th May.

28 April 1917

The local newspaper reported this week the death of Private John Parker, Bowes Court, Whitehaven. Private Parker joined the Border Regiment but transferred to the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. He leaves a widow and five children.

29 April 1917

There was a crowded congregation at St Michael's Church, Arlecdon this evening, when a service was held in memory of Private Walter Blackburn, who died of wounds. The Rev H.Hunter Parker said that the roll of honour now contained the names of 105 brave men. Of these no fewer than 13 had passed from the land of battles to the land of rest and peace. At the close of the service Miss Ives, the organist, played the 'Death March'.

30 April 1917

PATTINSON: In Loving Memory of Gunner John Pattinson, who died on April 30th 1917
"Mixed pastures green he'll lead his flock
where living streams appear,
and God the Lord from every eye
shall wipe off every tear"
Ever remembered by Frank (Barrow News 27.04.1918)

01 May 1917

FISHERMEN! Angling is a pastime which has its joys and sorrows. It is now becoming an art of great value. The scarcity of food and the various food restrictions make fish now-a-days a valuable article of diet, and it becomes a necessity as well as a pleasure to catch as many fish as you can. Most of the joys of fishing come from using good tackle, whilst the sorrows mainly come through faulty materials and a short supply of fish. The latter we cannot remedy, but we can show you good value and supply you with the very best to be had in Fishing Rods, gut, dressed trout and salmon flies, nets, spoons, reels, lines, casts, and all kinds of tackle required to make a successful and happy fisherman. You would do well to examine our stock. You will be surprised and pleased Hobbies Stores, Kerr and Co, Workington.

02 May 1917

I, Private Joseph Miller of 22 St Helens Street, Cockermouth, give notice that I shall not be responsible for any DEBTS contracted by my wife after this date May 2nd 1917.

03 May 1917

The Cumberland News announced this week that it had many past and present members of its staff serving with the Colours, but the first amongst them to make the great sacrifice is Lance-Corporal WV Shields, of the Border Regiment. Lance-Corporal Shields, who was 22 years of age, joined the Cumberland News printing staff and concluded his apprenticeship a few months before enlisting. He was a bright and intelligent young fellow, and the news of his death has been received with great regret.

04 May 1917

This week's West Cumberland Times carried a letter from J Spedding, Red Beck Cottages, near Cleator Moor, offering his recipe for a tea substitute:
Dear Sir - The following is a good tea substitute - Agrimony, meadowsweet, raspberry leaves, great burnet, wood beltony, and wood avens. Method to use - equal parts (any quantity) cut up and well mixed, sweeten with sugar or lemon juice [sic], a continuance of the above will speak for itself.

05 May 1917

Red House Auxiliary Hospital, Appleby, opens.

06 May 1917

A real necessity for WOMEN-WAR WORKERS. Women war-workers find that the grit and grime of the munition factories, exacting hospital work, and exposure to sudden weather changes are injurious to the skin. Fortunately, they have in Ven-Yusa Cream a preparation which, by means of its special oxygen properties, revives the lustre of faded complexions and brings back the bloom of youth to pallid cheeks. Thousands of women know from personal experience that no other toilet cream can be so invigorating, so agreeable, or so beneficial. The regular use of Ven-Yusa will save you hours of discomfort, and banish forever the tired, irritable feeling after a hard day's work. [Advert in this week's Cumberland News]

07 May 1917

Lingholm Officers Hospital (28 beds) and Broad Leys Officers Hospital, Windermere (12 beds) open today.

08 May 1917

The housing problem in Barrow. The Barrow Town Council decided today to enter into an agreement with the Ministry of Munitions for the authority to build 250 houses for munition workers at Vickerstown, Walney Island. The property will be managed by the Corporation, who at the end of five years will take over the houses at a fair valuation.

09 May 1917

In the 'Pageant of a Fair Woman', organised by Madame Clara Butt, at the Queen's Hall, London, this week, in aid of the Three Arts Women's Employment Fund on 'Joan of Arc day', Mrs Christopher Lowther impersonated Alsace-Lorraine, who was dramatically represented crushing the German eagle with her heel.

10 May 1917

Royal Navy Submarine HMS L1 launched at Barrow. [Scrapped 1930].

11 May 1917

A Wigton soldier has sent home some interesting trophies of the landing of a 'Fokker' brought down by rifle fire between the lines. These include the pay book of a German soldier named Huther, who appears to have had a long period of typhus and cholera according to the hospital records in the book. Photographs showed a mother and child (the name Philip Huther being on the back), another full length soldier, and a family group of a mother and five young children.

12 May 1917

Formidable indeed is the bread question. Public journals teem with ideas, hints and advice and suggestions how to find the best substitute for wheaten bread. Recipes for bread made of maize, rye, rice, barley flour and other farina abound. Some prove satisfactory, others leave much to be desired. [Our Ladies Budget column in this week's Carlisle Journal].

13 May 1917

This afternoon there was held a service in memory of Private Joseph William Cavanagh, son of Mr and Mrs Cavanagh, Nook Cottage, Great Broughton, who was killed in action, in Christ Church, Great Broughton. Throughout, the service was of a most impressive character. At the close the organist played the 'Death March' as the congregation remained standing.

14 May 1917

Her Majesty's Theatre, Carlisle. Alfred Denville presents his Special Company in a new Production, entitled 'THE SPIRIT OF THE EMPIRE'. In three scenes and eleven episodes, depicting the evolution of a modern 'Scrooge' from a selfish pacifist to a patriot, the metamorphosis being achieved by the 'Spirit' of the Empire' showing him  - 'The Angel of Mons', Captain Fryatt, Munition Works, 'Napoleon and the Spy,' Nurse Cavell, No Man's Land, HMS Chester, Jack Cornwall.

15 May 1917

Private Joseph Falcon, who has been wounded for a second time, writes to his father, Mr William Falcon, Town Head, Dearham: - 'I was wounded in the thigh about 7:30am on April 9th by a sniper, with an explosive bullet, just as I had thrown a second bomb at five Germans in a shell hole twenty-seven yards away. The bomb had just left my hand when flop I went. The bullet went through my coat pocket, breaking my pipe mouthpiece on its course, taking them and a piece of cloth into my thigh. On coming out it had blown a piece out of the inside of my thigh about four inches long and three inches wide. It is doing alright, but there are still two pieces left in yet. I cannot make the least start to walk without crutches, but I hope I will soon be fit again.'

16 May 1917

Mr F. Scott, B.A., who was an assistant master at the Workington Secondary School was granted exemption as a conscientious objector, but whose exemption was successfully appealed against, has been court-marshalled and sentenced to 12 months hard labour.

17 May 1917

Their Majesties the King and Queen have devoted the whole of the present week to a tour of the North of England, inspecting munition factories, shipyards and other hives of industry. They spent this morning at Barrow in Furness before travelling north to visit Workington iron and steel works where a really Royal welcome awaited them.

18 May 1917

After yesterday's Royal visit to Barrow Mr Alfred Vickers, the Chairman of Messrs Vickers Ltd, forwarded the following message to the King:
"On behalf of my company I humbly desire to express to your Majesty and the Queen our great appreciation of the honour conferred upon all connected with the company by the visit of your Majesty to the Naval Construction works at Barrow, and to the munitions factories in Lancashire which we have the privilege of managing on behalf of your Government. A number of the workmen of all departments are with me now, and desire me to associate them in the expression of thanks to your Majesty for your visit, and the keen interest and great kindness shown by your Majesty. They feel with me that your presence among them will stimulate and encourage them in their efforts to continue in assisting our brave and gallant soldiers, who are given their all for freedom and honourable and permanent peace. As one of the workers said, your presence among your subjects as you came today must tend to deepen in all your people their determination to achieve a great victory".

19 May 1917

Carlisle 0 Workington 1. This ladies football game was played today at Brunton Park in aid of the Border Regiments' Prisoner of War Funds. A crowd of several thousand attended the game which the Mayor kicked off.

20 May 1917

FOOD BATTLE; Economy Campaign. A Mass Meeting under the auspices of the Carlisle Citizens' League and the National Union of Women Workers, will be held in Her Majesty's Theatre on Sunday 20th May at 8:15 pm. Speaker Mrs Pember Reeves, Director of Women's Service (Ministry of Food). Chairman His Worship the Mayor of Carlisle. Doors open 7:45pm

21 May 1917

Mr Henry Thompson, tenor in Mr Joseph O'Mara's Opera Company, and a native of Maryport, appeared at a tribunal in Manchester today. Mr Thompson sang leading roles in 'Carmen' 'Romeo and Juliet' and other operas during the Carlisle visit of the O'Mara Company.
Mr Thompson, who was described as a Class 'A' man, 28 years of age and married. His counsel said he was one of the four leading tenors in the country. He was also a skilled engineer, making tools for shell making. In dismissing the appeal, Judge Mellor said 'A' men were wanted in the Army, and one who had been on the stage would probably be a very good leader.

22 May 1917

A death caused by eating boiled rhubarb leaves was investigated at Wakefield recently. The deceased was Hannah Dixon Blaylock, aged 15, daughter of William Blaylock, joiner, Carlisle. The girl was attending school at Wakefield  and it appeared she had for dinner roast beef, potatoes and boiled rhubarb leaves. The next day she was taken ill, and afterwards removed to the Clayton Hospital where she died. Miss Maria Owen, matron of the Home, said she had seen it stated that boiled rhubarb leaves were a good substitute for cabbage. A trial of it was made by the staff, and beyond slight diarrhoea which attend the eating of any changed diet there were no ill effects, and it was decided to serve rhubarb leaves as a vegetable to the girls. All the girls, 22 in number, partook of the food and four others beside Blaylock were taken ill, but had recovered. The post mortem examination showed the death was due to oxalic acid poisoning. The coroner said that even with the present shortage of food there was very great danger in the use of rhubarb leaves.

23 May 1917

Demonstrations in Cookery and Rationing will be given at no 12 English Street, Carlisle.  Miss Fanny Smith, Northern Counties School of Domestic Science, will deal with the preparation of vegetable and savoury dishes, puddings, oatmeal bread, cakes and scones, fish and other food available under present conditions. The demonstrations will be given each day this week at 11:30am, 2:30 and 6:30pm.

24 May 1917

FARMERS - ARE YOU SHORT OF LABOUR? If you can do with an additional farm hand, apply at once to the Women's War Agricultural Committee, organising secretary Miss MF Hartley, 22 Lowther Street, Carlisle. The Committee are able to supply Women at once, highly-recommended, 6 months to 3 years' experience, in all kind of Farm Work. Also Girls for training. President; The Lady Mabel Howard, Greystoke Castle, Penrith

25 May 1917

Carlisle Journal columnist Muriel writes this week:
Fashion has been likened to a 'minotaur whose maw is insatiable'. It is quite true, Thrones may totter, war devastate, and famine threaten. No matter, the insatiable demands of fashion must be met. Now that the use of starch is prohibited in laundries, article of wear formerly stiffened may possibly become useless.

26 May 1917

Workington Munition Girls versus Whitehaven Ladies, Lonsdale Park, Workington. Kick off 3:30pm. Admission: Grandstand 1s 6d; Open Stand 1s; Ground 6d: Boys half price. COME IN CROWDS and help the Wounded Soldiers, Red Cross Clothing Fund, Prisoner of War Fund, and Star 'Smoke' Fund. [Score Workington 0 Whitehaven 1].

27 May 1917

Church Army Huts in France. Magazines, games, light literature for the Church army huts in France, will be gratefully received by Lady Gillford. Parcels to be addressed to her at the Bishop of Barrow's House, The Abbey, Carlisle.

28 May 1917

GIRLS FOOTBALL; Derwent Mills 1 Workington Combine 0. The game  between the girls' teams was played at Sandair, Cockermouth, today. The weather was very hot, and two half-hours were played. The gross proceeds amounted to £ 100 which was in aid of the Soldiers' Comforts Fund.

29 May 1917

An unusual War-Book. HANDED OVER. The prison experience of Mr J Scott Duckers, under the Military Service Act, written by himself. Of immediate human interest and permanent documentary value. One shilling and six pence net [Scott Duckers, a conscientious objector, went to Wandsworth prison for his refusal to join the army. The author's family lived in Wetheral and he was articled with a Carlisle solicitor before moving to London].

30 May 1917

Commendable efforts on behalf of local war funds are being made by the school children of the Lake District. Organised by the headmasters, the boys have collected during the past year 50 tons of waste paper, which has realised £ 302. The girls are engaged under the direction of the head mistresses in collecting tinfoil, leadfoil and aluminium. Grasmere, Ambleside, Troutbeck, Windermere, and Bowness are the principal villages concerned.

31 May 1917

The members and adherents of Silloth Primitive Methodist Church, joined in the resolution sent to the Prime Minister, condemning the use of grain and sugar in the manufacture of alcohol, and urging prohibition during the war and demobilisation.

01 June 1917

A sitting of the Appeal Tribunal was held today at Grecian Villa, Cockermouth. 48 cases were dealt with. Joseph Head, draper, Duke Street, Whitehaven, appealed on domestic grounds. He was willing to undertake non-combatant services, but as a Christian he could not take life. - He was ordered to go for non-combatant service.

02 June 1917

Sergeant R Walker, of Barrow in Furness, has been awarded the Military Medal for conspicuous bravery in the advance at Fampoux. He is 27 years of age, and has been in France since August 24th 1914. He has gone through much fighting without a scratch. In a letter to his parents at Barrow he says; - We are having a good time as the Germans run for their lives as soon as they see us on the scene. This the year of victory, and things have to be kept going. Not a minute's peace are we giving them. How they stand it I do not know, as our guns never cease, and the shells out here are awful. The Germans are beaten now if ever a nation was. The fighting is simply grand compared with trench warfare.

03 June 1917

War Bread Recipe in this week's Westmorland Gazette. 3lbs war flour, 1.5 oz yeast, 1 tablespoonful salt, 1.5 pints tepid water. Mix flour and salt. Warm them. Mix yeast smoothly with a little tepid water. Make up to a pint. Pour into flour. Leave in a warm place for 20 minutes. Knead, adding more water as necessary, until an elastic light dough is formed. Cover and let it rise 1.5 hours. Let them rise 10 minutes. Bake in moderate oven. Time according to size. 1oz lard may be rubbed into the flour if wished before mixing. Some milk may be added if liked.

04 June 1917

Carlisle Assizes. This week Arthur Dixon (27), a gunner in the Royal Field Artillery, was indicted for bigamy at Whitehaven on December 23rd, when he married one Jane Spiers, his wife Annie being then alive. The prisoner pleaded guilty. It was stated that the prisoner was stationed at Lowca in the early part of the last year and there became acquainted with Jane Spiers whom he married at Whitehaven on December 23rd. He told the girl's father that he was not married, although at the time he had a wife and three children living. Superintendent Hogg stated that the prisoner was a native of Barnsley, and had lived in that neighbourhood all his life and borne a good character. The Learned Judge, in passing sentence, said the prisoner had behaved very badly to the girl, having denied to her that he was a married man. Bigamies were becoming too common, and it was necessary that Judges should be more severe than they had been. Prisoner was sentenced to Nine months imprisonment with hard labour.

05 June 1917

At the Westward Tribunal today Mr Joseph Sarginson, contractor, Eamont Bridge, applied for his two sons. One of them, he said, was troubled with rheumatism :-  The Chairman: The Army is a good cure for rheumatism - Mr Sarginson: I wish they had a  good cure for the war (Laughter) - Both men given until November 11th.

06 June 1917

Appleby Court. Alleged  sugar hording. Richard Jackson Dawson, agricultural merchant, Aspland House, Appleby, a member of Westmorland County Council, was charged with acquiring 1 cwt of sugar, so that the quantity of such article in his possession or under his control at any one time exceeded the quantity required for ordinary use and consumption in his household.  Messrs J and H Charles, wholesale grocers, Barrow in Furness, was charged with aiding and abetting. Superintendent Dickinson said that on behalf of all the parties concerned he wished to ask for an adjournment of the case for a fortnight, and the magistrate granted the request.

07 June 1917

The Crow Pest. To the Editor of the Carlisle Journal. Sir:- While the destruction of young rooks has been called for by the War Agricultural Committee and various rookeries have been dealt with outside the city, I do not see that any attempt had been made to reduce the large rookery in Morton Park [Carlisle]. In view of the seriousness of the food question, perhaps Mr Chance would give this matter consideration, and incidentally help the neighbouring farmers, if he could spare a little time from his multifarious duties to organise a day's shooting. I am etc CROW PIE.

08 June 1917

Captain AL Butler is the twelfth 'old boy' of Seascale Preparatory School who has been killed during the war. His elder brother was also killed, the school list of fallen men being as follows: - DR Townshend and IUB Melthrush, former masters. WRL Calrow, GW Hodgson, JH Auld, WL Butler, H Stewart Wallace, MD Campbell, J Price, Arthur Jacques, HA Saportas and AL Butler, former pupils.

09 June 1917

Cockermouth Theatre and Cinema House presents this evening 'FOR FRANCE', an incident of the present war, depicting realistic battle scenes and life in the trenches which cannot fail to arouse interest and enthusiasm. Prices (including Tax) - Balcony, Reserved, 1s; Unreserved 7d; Centre Stalls 5d; Pit 4d.

10 June 1917

Labour meeting at Whitehaven today. A public meeting under the auspices of the Whitehaven Labour Party - which was billed as a demonstration of sympathy and congratulation in regard to the Russian Revolution - was held in the town hall Whitehaven this evening. The following resolution was submitted this meeting sends joyful congratulations to the democrats of Russia and calls upon the Governments of Great Britain and of every country, neutral and belligerent alike, to follow the Russian example by establishing industrial freedom, freedom of speech and the Press, the abolition of social, religious, and national distinctions, an immediate amnesty for political and religious offences and universal suffrage.

11 June 1917

Silverdale and District Art and Industrial Society. In view of the difficulties of Railway facilities and the Food Controller's regulations, the Committee has decided that ANNUAL EXHIBITION WILL NOT BE HELD THIS YEAR. Exhibits prepared for 1917 will  hold good for next Exhibition. EB Wren, Hon Sec.

12 June 1917

Andrew Lowther, Border Regiment, the famous Keswick wrestler and present holder of the 11 stone championship cup of the world, has been released from the Army, and is now working in a West Cumberland Pit.

13 June 1917

In connection with mobilisation of books for soldiers' use, mentioned in last week's issue [Westmorland Gazette], we are asked to state that at Windermere, Bowness, and Troutbeck, 8,023 books and 1,349 Magazines were collected, making a total of 9,372.

14 June 1917

Holme Cultram Urban District Council met this week and discussed the petrol restrictions. In Abbey Town there were two motor cars used for business purposes, and in Silloth five, but the whole of these were practically held up by the recent regulations. This pressed hard upon the people of Silloth and Abbey Town and the district, which was badly supplied with railways. Instances of illness were highlighted in which the use of cars was necessary, but could not be obtained.

15 June 1917

'I am sorry to notify that Rifleman Reginald John Atkinson, my late Pupil Teacher, was killed in action on the 3rd inst' [Burgh by Sands School Log Book, head Mr William H. Bell].

16 June 1917

Borough of Workington. PROPOSED WAR MUSEUM. The Library Committee have decided to appeal to the public at large and to the relatives of our local soldiers and sailors for WAR PICTURES and SOUVENIRS with a view to form a LOCAL WAR MUSEUM.

17 June 1917

Baptised this day at St Michael's, Workington, Edith Cavell daughter of Joseph and Mary Clark of 12 Warwick Place, Workington.

18 June 1917

Yesterday at Carlisle Castle the Military Cross won by the late Captain TL Jackson of the Cheshire Regiment was presented to his father, Mr T Jackson, of Greystoke, by Colonel Cooper.

19 June 1917

Private Stephen Caulfield, Seaforth Highlanders, Whitehaven, who was recorded by a comrade to have been killed, has written home saying that he 'is still in the land of the living'.

20 June 1917

The Penrith Urban Council agreed today that seats for wounded soldiers should be placed on the north-west side of the Monument and against the drinking fountain in the Corn Market. Mr Reed said he was strongly opposed to the erection of these seats in their present position, and moved that they be placed in Wordsworth Street and Beacon Street. This proposal was negatived.

21 June 1917

A meeting of the Keswick Tribunal was held today. Mr G Watson presiding. A hotel porter, aged 35, married, and C2, was appealed for by his employer, who said that he had been 13 years in his employment and was indispensable. As the man had been rejected three times for tuberculous glands, he considered that he would be more useful in his present work than in the Army, and that he would be able to devote more time to it. Temporary exemption till September 30th.

22 June 1917

By the arrival this week of a consignment of 43 wounded soldiers the Penrith and Greystoke Military Hospitals are again filled. In order to make room for the new arrivals about a dozen of the convalescent patients have been taken to Ennim, where Mr and Mrs H Riley offer their hospitality to convalescents.

23 June 1917

Whitehaven Auxiliary Hospital is open to visitors this afternoon from 3pm - 6pm admission 6d each I M Desborough Ward, commandant.

24 June 1917

National Federation of Discharged Soldiers and Sailors  A MEETING of the above will be held in a room kindly lent by Mr J Cusack, Solway Inn, Church Street, Workington at 7pm this evening. All Discharged men are invited to attend.

25 June 1917

Private T Walton, Border Regiment, has been missing since May 19th. His mother lives at High Loveday, Alston.

26 June 1917

This week the local press reported that the King had approved of the Duke of Teck becoming the Marquis of Cambridge; Prince Alexander of Teck, Earl of Athlone: Prince Louis of Battenberg, Marquis of  Milford Haven; and Prince Alexander of Battenburg, Marquis of Carisbrooke. Prince Louis's sons will take the title of Mountbatten. In 1917 the Chief Constable in Carlisle changed his name from EH de Schmid to EH Spence. He was a Devon man.

27 June 1917

SUCCESS to the BORDER REGIMENT. Every man can show his appreciation of our Boys of the Border by wearing the Border Colours - and to do that he only needs to buy one of the ties which are now being shown in our shops. Fitzsimmons, 77 Botchergate and 17 Lowther Street, Carlisle.

28 June 1917

Kirkby Stephen Brass Band has decided, owing to the shortage of players, to discontinue the band for the duration of the War. The accounts showed a deficit of £ 4 (subsequently reduced to three pounds by a special donation).

29 June 1917

INFORMATION respecting  Sgt T COYNE , no 18189, Border Regiment, reported MISSING 19th May 1917, will be greatly APPRECIATED by his Father, J.COYNE, 30 Anglesea Avenue, Harpurhey, Manchester (Carlisle Journal 29.05.1917).

30 June 1917

The Carlisle Journal reported that a Cumbrian recuperating in a French hospital after being severely wounded and having their leg amputated had been decorated with the Croix de Guerre with Silver Star by the French General Ditte. The citation said that for two years they had worked devotedly with the continual transportation of the wounded. Numerous allied officers were present. Amongst the usual war reports that filled the paper this one may have especially caught the attention as the recipient was a Miss Waddell of Warwick Bridge, outside Carlisle.

01 July 1917

A public service in connection with the dedication of the memorial Cross to the memory of the Fellside Fallen Soldiers will be held at Tea Well, Fellside today at 3:15pm. Dedication by the Right Rev The Bishop of Barrow. Admission by ticket only.

02 July 1917

Dominion Day, Canadian National Holiday. A great baseball match will be played at Brunton Park Football Ground at 3pm, between RIDDINGS JUNCTION and ORTON PARK CANADIAN CAMPS. Nine men aside. Noted players in both teams Admission - Gentlemen 1s, Ladies 6d ,Soldiers in Uniform 6d. Proceedings to Border Prisoners of War Fund.

03 July 1917

03.07.1917 LOST, between MARYPORT and Workington, PENDANT, containing Photo of Soldier killed in action, - Finder rewarded on returning to Police Station

04 July 1917

The Cumberland and Westmorland Appeal Tribunal sat in Carlisle this week.  The Military Representative appealed against the exemption of David Clark, employed as a carter by the Carlisle Corporation. Clark is thirty-six years of age, married and has six children, the eldest of whom is twelve. He is Class A, and his duties include the collection of household refuse. The Military Representative said this work was done at Whitehaven by men over military age. The Chairman commented - It is the sea air at Whitehaven. The Military Representative replied - No, common sense. Mr Hill, Chief Sanitary Inspector for Carlisle, said this man had been in employment for twenty years. He had thirty-four employed in his department and only four were of military age. The appeal was allowed.

05 July 1917

Cruiser HMS Curlew launched at Barrow.  [Scrapped 1940].

06 July 1917

Submarine HMS L2 launched launched at Barrow. [Scrapped 1930].

07 July 1917

Levens Gardens will be open to the public on Thursday and Saturday afternoons, between the hours of 1 and 5:30 pm. Admission Adults 6d, Children 3d. No charge will be made to Residents in Levens and Heversham, or to Soldiers in Uniform.

08 July 1917

This  evening at Tebay Church a stained glass window to the memory of Private J Thistlewood, Tebay, was dedicated by the Rev J Whitmore. The window, which has been erected at the west end of the church, has for its subject Christ blessing little children. A brass plaque bears the inscription 'This window is dedicated to the glory of God, and in loving memory of Private John Thistlelwood, Northumberland Fusiliers, who  died of wounds received in France, September 18th 1916, aged 22 years. Erected by his brother and sisters'.

09 July 1917

Submarine HMS M1 launched  at Barrow. [Rammed and sunk 1925].

10 July 1917

Westmorland Women's War Agricultural Committee have arranged for demonstrations of fruit and vegetable bottling and preservation to be given  today in Kendal Town Hall at 2:30pm.

 

11 July 1917

The Holme Cultram Tribunal was held today in Abbey Town. An application for exemption was made by Thomas Jackson, Forrester's Arms Inn, Causewayhead, described as an innkeeper and mole catcher who is 36 and married. He stated in support of his appeal that he had caught 2,000 moles this year. The application was disallowed, applicant not to be called up until August 31st.

12 July 1917

At the Grasmere Military Tribunal this week Miss F Kirkby applied for a recommendation for her nephew, John Kirkby, under gardener at Lancrigg, 21, to be examined by the Central Medical Board at Leeds on the ground that the decision of the Board at Carlisle was given without due examination. Dr Johnson certified that he had known and attended Kirkby all his life. He would be useless both mentally and physically under the strain of military life. He was rejected as unfit for military service at Ambleside on November 15th 1915. The military representative assented to his being examined by the Central Medical Board.

13 July 1917

Lance Corporal Jonathan Whitehead Mason of the 21st Division Cyclist Company, Army Cyclist Corps, who was declared  no longer physically fit for  war service on 19.06.1916, committed suicide this day at his home in Lonsdale Road, Millom. He was 22 years of age.

14 July 1917

Second Lieutenant Maurice Fairbairn, Royal Lancaster Regiment, and two other officers were killed by a shell whilst asleep in their dugout about 2am on Saturday July 7th. In a letter to his mother at Barrow his Commanding Officer says - 'Your son was a reliable and plucky lad and can be ill spared.' Before enlisting in January last year deceased was in the office of Messrs WB Peat and Co, chartered accountants, Barrow.

15 July 1917

Owing to the war the Keswick Convention is not being held this year.

16 July 1917

WANTED, for the duration of the war, or until the present holder returns, an Experienced CLERK, either ineligible male or lady, for General Office. Applications, stating age, salary required, experience, and references, will be received by first post on Friday 13th. - Committee, Co-Operative Society LTD, Egremont, Cumberland.

17 July 1917

Women Workers on the Land for Silloth and District. The Labour Department of the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries has now completed arrangements for supplying female labour on the land for Silloth and District. They have appointed Miss Barnes, Blitterlees, as village registrar, and Mrs Carter Wood, Skinburness Towers, as district representative. It is requested that all applications should be made to these ladies.

18 July 1917

Arrangements are being made by the Old Beghians Club to hold a meeting shortly for the purpose of considering the 'provision of a permanent war memorial of Old St Beghians who have fallen in the war.' A proposition will be submitted to the meeting by the President of the Club that a fund be raised, having for its objects (a) the erection of a permanent memorial and record at the School; (b) the provision of an endowment for the education at St Bees School of the sons or brothers of Old St Beghians who have fallen or been incapacitated in the war.

19 July 1917

Death of Private JW Pritt of Corney. Mr and Mrs Myles Pritt, Far Bank, Corney, have received word of the death of their second son, Private Joseph W Pritt, of the Lancashire Fusiliers, which took place on July 19th in France, from shrapnel wounds. He was educated at Waberthwaite and Millom Secondary Schools. After leaving School he was apprenticed to Mr E Woodall, grocer, Waberthwaite. When he joined his group he was just 18. [West Cumberland Times 4th August 1917].

20 July 1917

One hundred and twenty six casualties from the hospital ship Kalyan which had docked at Southampton arrived in Carlisle aboard a hospital train today. The casualties were forwarded to the following hospitals: Carlisle Chadwick, Carlisle Murrell Hill, Longtown, Brampton and Englethwaite.

21 July 1917

A novel football match was played on the Whitehaven Cricket Field this afternoon, the teams being Whitehaven Ladies and 'Handicapped' Welsh Fusiliers, the latter having been granted permission to play by Capt. Preston OC. The proceeds of the match were in aid of the Whitehaven District Branch Discharged Soldiers and Sailors. There was a large gathering of spectators. The soldiers eleven were handicapped by having their hands tied behind their backs, whilst the goalkeeper had the use of only one hand. There were many amusing incidents during the game which the ladies won by three goals to two.

22 July 1917

A mass meeting will be held in the Public Park, Carlisle, at 8pm this evening. Mr Charles Derry, DCM, National Organiser of the Federation of Discharged Sailors and Soldiers will address the public. Don't miss hearing this HERO OF MONS. Come in your thousands.

23 July 1917

A North Westmorland girl, whose home was at Warcop, has been sent to prison for four months because, as was explained by her advocate, 'she succumbed to the glitter and glamour of Carlisle'. She went to work at munitions and lodged amidst the glitter and glamour. She forgot her native modesty and respectability, was smitten with the vulgarest of all female vanities - a craving for costly finery- and, by pretending she was somebody else, got goods to the value of between £ 20 to £ 30. She is not the first woman with whose moral constitution the change to munition-making has not agreed.

24 July 1917

It is officially announced that the Minister of Munitions has definitely decided to take possession of Cumberland and Furness Iron Ores Mines immediately, and accordingly the mines will be under the control of the Government for the period of the war.

25 July 1917

Mr Smith Hill  has placed the Agricultural College, Aspatria, at the disposal of the National Services Department as a camp for public school boys doing harvest work. The War Office will provide equipment  for the six weeks the camp will last, and they asked that the Urban Council should charge no rates. At a meeting on Thursday the Council agreed to this.

26 July 1917

Two Military Medals awarded to stretcher bearers in the 5th (West Cumberland) Border Regiment were presented by Colonel HS Mayhew, Commanding the Border Depot, at the Castle, Carlisle, at noon today in the presence of the whole of the troops stationed there. The recipients were Private G Wilson (755),a discharged soldier, who lives at 48, Laconson Street, Workington, and Mr William D Ferguson, 171, Main Street, Parton, the father of the late Private J.Ferguson (240568).

27 July 1917

Whitehaven Women's Day. Patriotic Sale. Mrs Lowndes wishes to THANK all who so vey kindly lent War Relics and other Articles of interest  for Exhibition at the Town Hall, Whitehaven, on Friday July 27th on the occasion of the YMCA Patriotic Sale. The opportunity thus afforded to the Public to view such a unique and interesting Collection was greatly appreciated.

28 July 1917

The number of sand-bags made for use at the front by the boatmen of Bowness on Windermere has now reached between 17,000 and 18,000.

29 July 1917

Ernest Lamb, OUR BOYS' CLOTHIER, King Street, Whitehaven and at Workington.

30 July 1917

The shortage of houses at Barrow. Some idea of the lack of houses at Barrow can be gathered from the fact that last week, when the offices of the Labour Party were opened for the purposes of taking the names of those wanting houses, the place was besieged by women whose husbands were at work.

31 July 1917

A Whitehaven police-constable has just received a field card, which according to the date upon it, was posted at the end of August 1915, by his brother, who was then serving at the Dardanelles, and was killed in France twelve months ago.

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